Biographies

A Collection Of 232 Biographical Sketches of Early Dubois County Residents. Unless Otherwise Indicated, The Source is "Goodspeed's History of Pike and Dubois Counties", Published 1885.


NELSON HARRIS, a prominent citizen of Columbus Township,Dubois Co., Ind., and native of the same, was born September 5, 1848: he was the eldest child in a family of three—Nelson, America and Basil B.—born to William and Hester (Simmons) Harris, natives of Kentucky and Indiana. They were married in Dubois County, where they made their home and where the father died. The mother yet lives on the old place with our subject. The father served four terms as township trustee, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and a Republican in politics. Our subject received a limited education, and has always remained on the home farm. March 3, 1870, he was married to Charity Weaver, born May 12, 1855. daughter of Wesley and Elizabeth (Haymer) Weaver. To them were born five children: William N., Sarah E., Mary E., Solomon E. and Albert D. Mr. Harris owns 240 acres of land, well improved, and is an industrious farmer, well known, and respected by his neighbors. He is a Republican in politics.



GEORGE W. KESTERSON, a prominent young farmer of Columbia Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born August 0, 1861. He is the only child of Alfred and Martha E. (Beaty) Kesterson, who were born and married in Dubois County, where they remained until the Rebellion, when Mr. Kesterson enlisted in Company G., Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry; he was killed in battle, at Perryville, Ky., October 8, 1802; the mother married John W. Simmons, who is now deceased, and still resides in Columbia Township. Our subject, George W., made his home with his mother and step-father, and received a good common school education. He was married, March 9, 1881, to Miss Lucinda Nicholson, daughter of Joseph H. and Elizabeth (Coonrad) Nicholson. To them were born three children: Charles C. t William F. and Ida E. Mrs. Kesterson was born November 13, 1863. They own a good farm of eighty acres, and are energetic and enterprising young people, Mr. Kesterson is a Democrat in  politics.



DAVID C. LANE was born September 20, 1846, and was one of a family of three children—Jesse A., Henry and David C.—born to Mordica and Mary (Allen) Lane, natives, respectively  of North Carolina and Tennessee. They were married in Orange County, Ind., where they remained until 1879, when they moved to Dubois County, Ind., and lived there until their deaths. The mother was an earnest and useful member of the Christian Church. Our subject was reared and educated by his parents, and remained at home until his marriage, which occurred June 11, 1863; his wife was Miss Mary McGrew, daughter of Washington and Susan (Archer) McGrew, of Orange County, Ind. Eight children were born to this union: William M., Emma J., Lavina, Andrew, Zerilda, Martha, Sarah A. and Charley H. Mrs. Lane was born in 1845, and is a faithful member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Lane owns 340 acres of excellent land, well improved, and is a good farmer and stock raiser, and by energy and industry has acquired all his property since his marriage.



WILLIAM A. LINE, M. D., was born January 12, 1844, and is a son of John and Phoebe ( Pierson ) Line, who were natives of Tennessee and Indiana, respectively. The father's parents came from England and settled in Tennessee. Our subject's father made his home in Orange County, Ind., where he died in 1854. He was a colonel in the State militia, and county surveyor of Orange County, and filled several other minor offices. His wife still resides on the old farm in Orange County and is a member of the Baptist Church. Our subject was educated by his parents and remained with them until his marriage. At the age of eighteen he began the study of medicine with Drs. Schoonover and Ellis of Hardinsburg, Ind. About two years after he entered the medical college of Louisville, Ky., where he remained one term. Returning home he was united in marriage to Margaret Ellis, December, 1864. To them were born two children: John C. and  William M. For his second wife he took Mrs. Mary (Radcliffe) Young, and to their union three children were born : Mary, Francis and August. His wife dying January 1, 1881, he married Jennie Wininger, August 8, 1881. Dr. Line began practicing medicine in the town of Hillham in 1865, where he remained until 1883. Since then he has given up his profession to some extent and is now running a general store, and is doing a thriving  business. He owns 200 acres of land, well improved. The Doctor is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the central committee of Dubois County, and he is well and favorably known in his neighborhood. His present wife belongs to the Baptist Church.




THOMAS McCUNE, a native of Kentucky, born March 7, 1829, is the youngest in a family of twelve children born to James and Keziah McCune. The father came to Orange County, Ind., in 1832, and later came to Dubois County where he died. His wife was a member of the Baptist Church and died in Lawrence County. Our subject was left an orphan when about twelve years of age and made his way as best he could, working by the day and month until his marriage to Miss Lucinda Parsons, April 5, 1850. She is a daughter of Robert and Jane Parsons, and is the mother of nine children: Jane (deceased |. Mary, Elizabeth, Sarah A. (deceased). Lucinda. Missouri. Viola. Robert and James. Mr. McCune owns eighty acres of land, well improved, and is a good substantial citizen of Dubois County. In politics he is a warm Democrat, and his wife is a member of the Christian Church.


WILLIAM S. WINEINGER was born in Virginia, November 30, 1828, and was the eldest child of a family of fifteen children born to John A. and Catherine (Wineinger) Wineinger, who were natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. They were married in Virginia and came to Orange County, Ind., in 1837, and in 1855 located in Hillham, and some years later settled near Jasper, where he and wife remained till their deaths. He was a good and honest citizen, and he and wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject was educated by his parents and remained at home until he reached his majority. He was united in marriage with Miss Diana Roberts, December 6, 1849. To this union eleven children were born: John A. (deceased), Nancy J., George W., Lydia A. (deceased), Lucy E., Martin L., Sarah E., Charles W., Mary C., Stephen S. and William K. Mr. Wineinger is quite an extensive farmer and stock raiser, and is well and favorably known throughout the neighborhood. He has 440 acres of excellent land, partially improved with fair buildings. He is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Wineinger gave about $800 to the construction of the church, and has always taken a great interest in its welfare.


DAVID S. MORGAN was born August 5, 1834, in Orange County, Ind., and is the eldest son in a family of ten children born to Samuel G. and Mary (Taylor) Morgan, natives respectively of North Carolina and Indiana. They were married in Orange County, Ind., and resided there the rest of their lives. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which the father was a minister for about fifty years. Our subject received a liberal education and made his home with his parents until his marriage. October 19, 1853, he led to Hymen's altar Adaline McPheron, to whom one son was born, namely: William. Mrs. Morgan was born February 17, 1838, and died September 12, 1854. For his second wife Mr. Morgan took Rachel Horton, April 20, 1854, who  has presented him with eleven children: Alfred, Samuel, John J., FidelIa E., Mary E., Milly J., David G., Charles, Adaline I., Rachel M. and Pleasant. Mr. Morgan owns 245 acres of good land mostly under cultivation, and is a Republican in politics. In the late war he enlisted in Company G, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served his country for over three years. He is well and favorably known throughout the county, and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.



JOHN W. NICHOLSON, a native of Orange County, Ind., was born December 7, 1836. He is the eldest son in a family of eleven children born to Harvey and Maria (Connel) Nicholson, natives of North Carolina and Indiana, respectively. They settled in Orange County, and, about 1840, located in Dubois County, Columbia Township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father held the office of county commissioner two terms, and was township trustee under the old school law. The subject of our sketch received as fair an education as could be obtained in the schools of his boyhood, and January 31, 1861, he was united in marriage to Catherine McIver, born January 20, 1831, and daughter of Kenneth and Elizabeth (Cox) McIver. To this union seven children were born: Benjamin F., Attosey H., Thomas S., John W., Joseph S. and two children deceased. Mr. Nicholson owns forty acres of land, well improved. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as constable and notary public in his township, and is well respected by his neighbors. Mrs. Nicholson is a member of the Christian Church.



    BENJAMIN OWEN was born February 20, 1824, in Hawkins County, Tenn. He is a son of William and Phoebe (Luna) Owen, natives of Tennessee, who lived and died in their native State. Our subject received a limited education, and during the Mexican war he enlisted for five years, but served only one year. November 5, 1849, he was united in marriage to Miss Adaline Crowder, born July 19, 1828, daughter of Jacob and Susan  (Henley) Crowder. To this union were born eleven children - seven of whom are living: Susan J., Martha E., William P., Benjamin B., Thomas S., Commodore P., and Orlena A. Mr. Owen is an extensive farmer and stock raiser, and owns 503 acres of fertile land, well improved. Politically he is a Republican. August 31, 1861, he enlisted in Company P, Thirty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and was veteranized in January, 1864, at  Rossville, Ga. He was first lieutenant of his company, and a tried and true soldier; he and his wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is well and favorably known throughout the county.




JOHN L. BRETZ. prosecuting attorney for the Eleventh Judicial Circuit Court, is a native of Dubois County, Ind., and was born September 21, 1852, a son of Jacob and Eliza J. (Shively) Bretz, who were born in Germany and Kentucky, respectively, and came to this State at a very early day. John L. assisted his parents on the farm until twenty-two years old, and then began working for himself. In 1878 he commenced reading law with William A. Traylor, and the following winter and spring took a course of lectures in the Cincinnati Law College. In 1880 he took another course and graduated from the above named institution in June 1880. The same month he established his office in Jasper. He has attained a lucrative practice and is quite successful in his profession. In July. 1881, he was united in marriage with Miss Daniel, by whom he is the father of two children: Waverly and Ross. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and also belongs to the Masonic fraternity; he is a Democrat and is at present holding the office of prosecuting attorney.

 



JOSEPH BUCHART, merchant, of Jasper. Ind., was born June 20, 1841, being the sixth in a family of eight children born to Charles and Agnes Buchart, who were born in Germany and came here when the country was almost an entire wilderness. Joseph's education is limited, owing to the undeveloped school systems of his day. He was raised on a farm, and on attaining his majority he purchased a farm and launched out in life as a  farmer. About 1808 he married Barbara Hope, but their union was of short duration. Her death occurred about a year later. Three months after this he led to Hymen's altar Catherine Marks, and to them were born the following children: Frank. Henry, Michael, Julia, Mary. Conrad. Felix. William and Elizabeth. In 1872 he established himself in the retail liquor business, and continued that until 1870, when he disposed of his goods and started a general merchandise store ; he is a successful business man and an influential citizen: in politics a Democrat, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.



JOHN T. CORN, a prominent citizen and native of the county, was born February 18, 1849, and is the sixth in a family of nine children born to Jesse and Margery (Harris) Corn, natives of Crab Orchard, Ky., and Dubois County, Ind., respectively. The former came to this county with his parents in 1819, and here he afterward lived and made his home. John T. remained at home and assisted his parents on the farm until he attained his majority when he married Margery Ellen Wineinger and to their union four onildren have been born: Maggie E., born October 11, 1871; Laura Belle, December 11, 1874; Oliver Edmund Porter, August 12, 1880, and Effie, December 14, 1882. Our subject has always been a farmer and now owns 300 acres of fertile land. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the A. O. U. W. In politics he is a stanch Republican and has held the offices of constable and justice of the peace in Boone Township.



CLEMENT DOANE, editor and proprietor of the Jasper Courier, was born in Circleville, Ohio, November 11, 1832, and is one of a large family of children born to Guy W. and Charlotte (Thrall) Doane, natives of Connecticut and Vermont, respectively. 
The father was born August 7, 1788 and was an attorney at law. He came to Circleville, where he married and practiced his profession. Clement was raised in his native town, getting a fair English education and learned the printer's trade. When eighteen years old he left home and began working at his trade, in Portsmouth, Ohio, Louisville, Ky., and Rockport, Ind., until 1858, when he came to Jasper and started the Courier in company with John Mehringer and Rudolphus Smith, continuing with these gentlemen until 1859. He then assumed complete control of the paper and has conducted it successfully ever since, having the leading and only English Democratic paper in the county. March 27, 1859, he married Rachel H. Edmonston, a native of the county and daughter of Benjamin Edmonston. She died March 8, 1874, having borne six children, three now living: Benjamin E., present clerk of a public land committee at Washington, D. G, Charlotte and George P. In 1874 (December 31 ), Mr. Doane married Mary A. Crooks, a native of Spencer County, and daughter of Dr. Crooks of Rockport, Ind. She died March 18, 1883, leaving two children: Clement E. and Archibald C. Mr. Doane has taken a leading part in political affairs, and is an unswerving Democrat, and has been chairman of the County Democratic Central Committee for over twenty years, and is a member of the A. O. U. W. and belongs to the Methodist Church. He studied law and was admitted to practice in the county in 1860, but in later years he has given the most of his attention to his paper, with which he has had the best of success.



JOSEPH ECKSTEIN,  of the firm of Kunkel & Eckstein, was born in Ripley County. Ind., March 9, 1856, and is the next oldest in a family of nine children born to Theodore and Louisa (Renner) Eckstein, natives of Germany, who came to this country when quite young, and settled on a farm near Jasper, in 1864.  Joseph obtained a very good education and remained at home until he was twenty-five years old. February 14. 1882, his union with Theresa Haller was celebrated. They are the parents of one child. Louis. Soon after marriage Mr. Eckstein moved to Jasper, where he has ever since resided. He first engaged in teaming, which he followed about three months, and then purchased a one-half interest in a threshing machine, which business he follows every season. In 1883 he became a partner in the livery business, and has been very successful. He and family are Catholics, and he is a Democrat.



JOSEPH FRIEDMAN, senior member of the firm of Friedman. Scheirich & Co., of the Eclipse Planing and Saw-mill is a native of Pennsylvania, where he was born March 19, 1831, son of Joseph and Mary Friedman, who were natives of Germany. Before our subject was three years old his parents removed from Pennsylvania to this State of which they have since been residents. Joseph Jr., assisted his parents until lie attained his  majority, when lie married Apalonia Eckenfells; ten children were born to them, only eight of whom are living: Mary, Clarissa, Josephine, Elizabeth. Joseph and Anna (twins), William and Helena. In 1S."34 our subject engaged in the mercantile trade at Jasper, at  which he continued until 1874. Some time prior to this he had embarked in the saw and planing-mill business and in connection bought and shipped tobacco. In 1874 he disposed of his store, and since that time has devoted his time almost exclusively to his mill, and dealing in lumber of all kinds. February 26, 1878, Mr. Friedman's wife was called from among the living, and about April 11. 1880 he married Anna Habberly. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat and a very successful business man.


TOBlAS HERBIG. retail liquor dealer of Jasper, Ind., was born in Germany, April 12, 1832; son of John and Kathrina I Schneider) Herbig; in 1835 they started for the United States, and landed at New York, and came to this State after a three months' stay in Wheeling, W. Va. Six weeks after their arrival, Mr. Herbig was killed by a falling tree, which left the family without a protector. Tobias remained at home until he was eighteen years old; in his boyhood days schoolhouses were few and far between and the roads leading to them were through a wilderness of woods. Notwithstanding these drawbacks he received a fair education; he learned the wagon-maker's trade with Sebastian Kueble, and then established a shop for himself which he continued until 1868. February 14, 1854, he married Mary Lampert. They became the parents of eleven children, only two now living: Elizabeth and Joseph. In 1861 Mr. Herbig engaged in his present business. He owns the property on which the Pike White Sulphur Springs are situated, ten miles southwest of Jasper, on which he is building a large hotel, and intends making everything pleasant for invalids visiting the springs. The waters are strongly impregnated with mineral properties and are said to have effected some wonderful cures. Mr. Herbig is a member of the Catholic Church, is a Democrat, and has held a number of  county offices.


MICHAEL HOCHGESANG was born in Bavaria September 26, 1832, and is the youngest of eight children born to Andrew and Matilda (Benkert) Hochgesang. In 1848 they started for the United States, and on the voyage the mother was taken ill and died and was buried in the ocean while en route. The father came with his children to Indiana and located a few miles from Jasper, where he lived six years and then lived with his son-in-law, Adam Smith, until he died in 1870. Michael remained hard at work on the farm until he was twenty years old, when he went to Louisville, Ky.. and learned the bricklayer's trade. A year later he returned to this county and worked at his trade, and also contracting and building. After some time he began farming and continued it to the present time. In 1SN0 he established a brickyard near Jasper, and has made money in that business. He manufactures about 500,000 brick of superior quality per annum. As a Democrat, Mr. Hochgesang was coroner of the county five years, and filled the office creditably. In 1852 he married Otilda Habig, who bore him ten children: Mary, Joseph (deceased), Andrew, Albert, John, Rosa, Amelia. Dominic. Lawrence and Leo.

 


EDWARD J. KEMPF, M. D., of Jasper, Ind., was born in the town of Ferdinand. September 30, 1858, son of Matthew and Catherine (Jeglie) Kempf, who were natives of Baden and Switzerland, respectively. The father came to the United States and located in Louisville, Ky., where he studied medicine and practiced that profession until 1857, when he came to Dubois County and continued practicing until his death. He was a verysuccessful physician and surgeon, and was professor of surgery in the Kentucky School of Medicine at Louisville at the time of his death in 1880. He was a Democrat and a member of the State Legislature in 1859. The mother died in 1877. Our subject was raised in Ferdinand, receiving a good education, and attended St. Meinrad College four years. He began studying medicine when seventeen years old, and attended the University of Louisville during 1876, 1877 and 1878, graduating from that college in 1878. He then returned home and began practicing with his father. He practiced his profession in Ferdinand until 1885, when he came to Jasper. In 1884 he married Carrie Judy. He is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.

 


SEBASTIAN KUEBLER, merchant of Jasper, Ind., was horn in Baden, Germany, January l6, 1829, son of John and Magdalena (Gutzwiler) Kuebler, natives also of Baden. The father came to this country about 1832-33 and located in Ohio, where he farmed a number of years and in 1840 he removed to Dubois County, and still continued farming until he retired from work. He and wife resided with our subject until their deaths. Sebastian was raised in this county and learned the wagon maker's trade and followed this and blacksmithing in Jasper for over twenty years with good success. In 1875 he engaged in the leaf tobacco business, continuing in this three years. In 1878 he started his present business there and to the present time has met with fair success. He has a large and select stock of general merchandise and has a good trade. In 1853 he married  Stephana Lampert, a native of Germany. To them were born ten children—three sons and seven daughters. Mr. Kuebler is a Democrat and has held the office of township trustee,  for four years. He was one of the first members of the town council and secured the incorporation of Jasper. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church and he is one of the solid business men of the county.


NICHOLAS J. OBERST is a member of the firm of Friedman, Scheirich & Co., who established their business in 1884, with a capital stock of $50,000. He is a native of Dubois County, born February 24, 1850, and is the third in a family of eleven  
children born to John N. and Elizabeth (Schmidt) Oberst, who were natives of Germany, the former coming to this State and county about 1832. Our immediate subject was raised in this and Martin Counties, and received a good common school education. In 1874, he entered into partnership with P. Scheirich and Paul Egg, under the firm name of P. Egg & Co. Two years later Mr. Egg retired from the saw-mill business, and the remaining partners purchased his interest and established a planer in connection with their sawing department. They continued in the business under the name of P. Scheirich & Co., until 1884 where the firms were united as above. They deal in all kinds of lumber, lath and shingles, sashes and blinds, and, in connection with their mill, operate a retail hardware store, and deal in all kinds of goods pertaining to that line of business. They employ  about thirty-five men and are doing one of the most extensive trades of any firm in southern Indiana. Mr. Oberst's marriage with Miss Davis was solemnized in 1872. They are the parents of four children, and he and his family are members of the Catholic Church.



CHRIST. SCHENK, native of Prussia, was born March 10. 1843, son of Christ and Dorothea (Jacobs) Schenk. Our subject remained in his native land until he was twenty-four years old and received a good common school education. Meanwhile he learned the cabinet-maker's trade and in 1867 took passage for the United States, and first settled in Indianapolis, Ind.. where he remained for one year and then moved to Tell City. In 1879  he came to Jasper, Ind. August 1,1870, his marriage with Augusta Steiner was solemnized. To their union two children were born: Fritz and Oscar. In the fall of 1883, he became one of the partners of the firm. Benkert & Co.. manufacturers of oak and hickory spokes. They have a capital of $3,500 and are doing an, extensive business in their line, and have a fair outlook for the future. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church and he is an ardent Democrat and an excellent citizen.



ISIDOR SCHUHMACHER, auditor of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, November 10, 1841, son of _______ and Magdalena Schuhmacher, both natives of Germany where 1 the father died in 1847. Isidor was raised in his native country and received a fair education for the time and advantages he had for securing it. At the age of ten years he immigrated to the United States with his mother and located on a farm near Ferdinand where he lived three years, and then came to Jasper and learned the wagon-maker's trade, following this and carpentering until the war broke out. when he enlisted in the Twenty-fifth Indiana Infantry, and served his country faithfully and well for over a year. He then returned home and continued at his trade over two years, and then took the position as United States mail carrier from Jasper to Loogootee, continuing four years. He then returned to his old occupation and in 1876 engaged in selling furniture and agricultural implements. In 1878 he was elected county auditor, and four years later was re-elected. Caroline Vollmer became his wife in 1861. She died seven years later, leaving him one child, Joseph I., who is deputy auditor. November  17, 1868, Isidor took for his second wife Mary Egg, who has borne him seven children, six now living. He has been very successful in business affairs, and is considered an excellent citizen. He and wife are Catholics.




JACOB WILHOIT, a prominent citizen of Bainbridge Township, Dubois County. Ind., was born in Woodford County, Ky., May 29, 1834, and is the fourth in a family of six children born to Abram and Frances (Mosby) Wilhoit, who were born in Kentucky and Virginia, respectively. They came to this State and county in 1838, and settled on the farm where our subject now lives. At that time the country was a complete wilderness  of woods. Jacob's father preceded them here, and made arrangements for their removal. He then returned to Kentucky for them, but sickened and died there a short time afterward. Jacob always lived at home with his mother, assisting her all he could. He received a very limited education, owing to the poor facilities of that day. His mother died September 10, 1883. April 29, L863, he married Amelia A. Thomas, and they became the parents of one child. John L., who died September 11, 1872. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a Democrat, He has succeeded well as a farmer, and now owns 176 acres of excellent land.

 


 

CHARLES D. WINEINGER, an energetic farmer of Madison Township. Dubois Co., Ind., born September 17, 1853, is a son of John A. and Catharine (Wineinger) Wineinger, natives of Tennessee. They were married in their native State, and after a few years came to Dubois County and bought 480 acres of land in Bainbridge and Harbison Townships, and began tilling the soil. His death occurred September 19, 1882, and the mother's  February 1, 1870. Our subject received a common school education and remained at home until he was about twenty-five years of age. March 30. 1880, he married Cordelia Lemond, daughter of Joseph and Charlotte Lemond. She was born December 5. 1856. They are the parents of two children, named Ray F. and Havilla. After marriage he purchased 220 acres of land in Madison Township, where he located and now lives. Mr. Wineinger is an industrious and worthy man. By industry he now has a good comfortable home, with many modern improvements. He is a Democrat in politics, casting his first vote for Samuel J. Tilden. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

C. W. ELLIS is the son of Marvin and Permelia J. Ellis, who were born and resided in the United States. March 23. 1873, the father died, and on the 22nd of June of the same year the mother followed him. C. W. Ellis, our subject, was born March 17, 1845, in Dubois County, Ind. He began teaching at the early age of seventeen and followed the profession until the age of twenty-one. His marriage occurred April 29, 1866, the result being eight children: Ida, Permelia K., Mary A., Marvin W. (deceased), Charley, Heber, Herl and Helen. Soon after marriage Mr. Ellis engaged in the saw and grist-milling business and in 1880 he erected a large two-story frame house, where he is at present carrying on an extensive trade in merchandise. His enterprises have been so successful that his mill, formerly run by water-power, is now run by steam. He has good farming land near Knoxville, and is carrying on his different enterprises successfully. He is well educated, having spent two terms of school at the Indiana State University. He and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Republican, and a very enterprising and successful business man.


SAMUEL W. WINEINGER is a son of John A. and Catherine Wineinger. The father, a native of Tennessee, was born in 1808. In 1835 he and his family moved to Orange County, Ind.. where they lived about twenty-one years, and then came to this county. Samuel was born November 18, 1832, in Tennessee. He was poorly educated, the sum total of his schooling being about three months. In 1870 he came in possession of 160 acres  of land, mostly timbered. He now has ninety acres cleared and under cultivation. He married Nancy A. Harris March 21, 1865. To them were born five children: Albert (deceased), Olga, Marshal (deceased), Homer, Delle and one unnamed. At the end of eight years his wife died, and January 6, 1879, he married Malissa Anderson, born August 14, 1852. They are the parents of four children: three unnamed and Dora. During the war Mr. Wineinger was mail carrier from Jasper to Albany. He is aDemocrat, and cast his first vote for Douglas. He and wife are church members.

 


JOHN P. WINEINGER, son of John A. and Catharine (Wineinger ) Wineinger, was born February 28, 1840, in Orange County, Ind. He had poor advantages for education, but now is a good business man. At twenty-two years of age he began working for himself on his father's farm. He now owns 200 acres of land, 100 under cultivation. About 1861 he married Rachel Corn, who lived only two years. A year later he took for his second wife, Maria White, who bore him four children : IrvieW., Belle, Stella and Charles. After a few years she was called from among the living, and in 1877 he married again—Caroline Walters became his wife, born June 23, 1856. The family born to this union are Nancy A., Andrew, Harvey L. and Cora V. Mr.
Wineinger is a warm Democrat, never having voted any other ticket. As a farmer he has been fairly successful, and he is much respected by his neighbors
.


GEORGE W. ABEL is the son of John and Sarah Abel. The father, a native of Virginia, was born in 1807, and the 
mother in Pennsylvania in 1825. John served as general of the Home Guards in Ohio, and subsequently engaged in 
surveying in Ohio and Indiana. After he had located in Dubois County he was elected assessor for many terms, and
between the years 1854 and 1860 he represented Martin and Dubois Counties in the Indiana State Legislature. His 
death occurred September 2, 1875. The subject of our sketch was born November 14, 1854. December 29, 1881, 
he married Margaret Walts of Haysville, Ind. He received a common school education, and in 1882 he was elected
justice of the peace, which office he has held ever since. He is a successful farmer, an unprejudiced office holder,
and an honest citizen.


MARTIN L. ANDERSON, son of James and Isabella (Mosby) Anderson, natives of Kentucky, was born December 15, 1830, in Dubois County, Ind. The father, who was of Irish descent, was a blacksmith by trade, and in connection, carried on farming. In 1830 he came to Dubois County, and purchased 440 acres of land in Madison Township, on which he located and remained until his death, which occurred April 15, 1879. His wife died September 24, 1869. Our subject was educated in the district schools near his home. September 1, 1859, he married Judy F. Lemmons, daughter of Abraham and Margaret Lemmons. She was born March 17, 1839, and is a native of Dubois County. They are the parents of these children: William E., Lola B. (wife of C. J. Mosby), Achsa (wife of Lewis Horton), Annie and Effie Jane. Mr. Anderson settled on the old place where he now lives. He is industrious, and now owns 299 acres of land. He is one of the old settlers of the county, and has lived to see it transformed from a wilderness into well cultivated farms. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for Filmore. He is a Mason, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.


 

JOHN H. ANDERSON, farmer, of Madison Township, Dubois Co., Ind., born in Indiana, May 28, 1832, is a son of William and Elizabeth (Harris) Anderson, who removed to this county in 1810  and settled on 160 acres of land which they began to clear and on which they built a good home ; they suffered many of the privations  incident to those early times, but by indomitable courage they overcame many of them. The father died June IB, 1843. The mother was of Welsh  descent, born May 17, 1800, and died February 18, 1877. John H, our subject, passed his early life on his parents' farm, and, when twentysix years old, married Aurelia Traylor, daughter of Spartan and Mary Traylor, born July 1, 1838, in Indiana. They are the parents of five children: Laura, Cordelia (deceased), Elmer (deceased), Oscar (deceased) and Mary. Mr. Anderson purchased eighty acres of land which, by industry, he has increased to 177acres, having inherited twenty-five acres. He has good buildings on his farm and in all respects is doing well. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for Fillmore. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.


HENRY BREIDENBAUGH, son of Nicholas and Margaret (Lotz) Breidenbaugh, was born in Germany, July 7, 1809, and at the age of fifteen, learned the paper-maker's trade, at which he worked thirteen years. In 1837 he left his native land and came to the United States, landing at Baltimore. Soon after he went to Springfield, Ohio, and worked on the turnpike and helped build the canal running through Dayton. He then came to Orange County, Ind., and farmed ten years. In 1849 he settled on a ninety acre farm in Dubois County, where he yet lives. September 1. 1839, he returned to Ohio, and married Mary Frankenberg, born February 7, 1820, and then returned to Indiana. To them were born these children; Caroline, George, John, Henry, William, Joseph, Margaret, Mary A., Julia and Lizzie. Mr. Breidenbaugh is an old time Democrat, casting his first vote for Polk. In 1850 he was elected trustee of Harbison Township, and filled the office satisfactorily. July 14. 1883, his wife died, and he now lives with his children.

 


GEORGE BREIDENBAUGH is a son of John and Dorothea (Lintner) Breidenbaugh. Both parents were born in Germany, and in 1837 the father came to America and settled on the farm where his son Adam now lives. Our subject was born February 6, 1857, in Dubois County. Ind., and at the age of eighteen began farming for himself on the home place. In 1884 he bought the farm of 102 acres, seventy-five acres of which are under good cultivation. August 21, 1884, he married Susan Hoffman, born September 30, 1860, native of Dubois County, and daughter of John and Catharine Hoffman, natives of Germany. Mr. Breidenbaugh is
a warm Democrat, casting his first vote for Hancock ; he is an energetic young business man of Dubois County, and will make life a success.

 


ADAM BREIDENBAUGH, brother of George Breidenbaugh (see sketch), was born July 16, 1849, and at the age of twenty-four he began working 'on the farm of 160 acres where he now lives. By hard work and good management he now has 100 acres under good cultivation, with excellent buildings. In 1874 he married Miss Nancy Able, and by her has one child, a daughter, Nancy. His wife died April 25, 1875, and four years later Mr. Breidenbaugh married Lena Huffman, born October 20, 1860. The fruits of this union are three children—two daughters and one son: Louella. Anna D. and Walter A. In politics he is a Leading Democrat of Boone Township, casting his first vote for Horace Greeley.


WILLIAM L. BRITTAIN. born November 25. 1826, is a brother of John C. Brittain (elsewhere written). He received but little education in boyhood, but has since educated himself in the practical affairs of life. At the age of twenty he began working for himself and soon after rented a farm where he continued for about four years. In 1853 he bought eighty acres of timber land, part of the farm on which he now lives. By hard work and good management he has increased his farm from eighty to 270 acres. 180 acres of which are cultivated. .January 18, 1849, he married Martha Norton, born August 9, 1828 in Kentucky.  She is a daughter of Drury and Nancy (Johnson) Norton. Mr. and Mrs. Brittain are the parents of five children : Sarah E., Mary E.. Nancy I.. John A. and Oliver P. Both husband and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Mr. Brittain is a leading Republican, and an example of what a young man of energy and brains may do. He began life with no capital but his two hands, but is now a successful and influential farmer.


 

JOHN C. BRITTAIN. farmer, was born in Dubois County, Ind., May 1, 1831, son of John G. and Sarah (Lindsey) Brittain. The father was born in South Carolina in 1790, and the mother born in Tennessee in 1808. John was a farmer and carpenter and came to this State about 1823, locating near Haysville, where he died in August, 1853. The mother is still living, aged seventy-seven years. Our subject received but little education, but by taking an active part in business life he acquired a good practical education. At the age of twenty he began working for himself and soon saved enough to purchase forty acres of timber land. This he cleared and then erected a log house. He now owns 214 acres of land, 150 acres being under cultivation. 
October 20, 1854. he married Rachel Cooper, born in 1837, daughter of William B. and Mary (Ferre) Cooper. They are the parents of twelve children: Marv J.. Elbridge E.. Abraham L., Rachel L., Ulysses H., George R„ Clara V.. Estella B., John O, James A. and two unnamed. Mrs. Brittain is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Brittain is a Republican and a good example of a self-made man. Starting from a hired laborer, he has risen step by step until he has acquired a comfortable competency.


LEMUEL L. COOPER, son of William B. and America (Brittain) Cooper, was born October 17, 1851, in Dubois County Ind. The parents were natives of Virginia and Indiana respectively. The father's death occurred July 15, 1865. Lemuel attended the common schools and afterward spent two years in the high school of Huntingburg, after which he taught school for five years, meeting with excellent success. In 1877 he purchased the farm of 160 acres on which he now lives and which affords him a good home. Josephine Green became his wife September 15, 1877. She was born January 26, 1858, daughter of Nenian and Charlotte (Dillen) Green. The father was a victim of yellow fever at Corinth, Miss., while he was there serving his country in the Fifty-eighth Regiment Indiana Infantry. Mr. and Mrs. Cooper are the parents of five children : Belle, Edna. Lilian, Kate and Alexander B. For two years Mr. Cooper has filled the office of township trustee and is now township assessor. He is a leading Republican and cast his first vote for Grant. He is an honest and reliable citizen and much respected. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.


JAMES P. HARBISON is the son of James P. and Elizabeth Harbison. The father was born in Kentucky February 12, 1803, and the mother was born March 18,1808. They married in Kentucky, and in 1827, removed to Dubois County, Ind., where the father followed farming as an occupation. His death occurred August 18, 1841, and the mother died October 11, 1885. Our subject was born in Harbison Township, February 14, 1830, and lived with his parents until his marriage, which took place December 19, 1851. His wife, Allatha Miller, was born born May 13, 1834. This union was blessed with four children: Eva, Emma, Lota B. and one not named. His wife died October 24, 1880, and about a year later he married Mary J. Miller, his present wife. They belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Harbison is a Republican, and has held the office of justice of the peace for twelve years. He is one of the old pioneer settlers of Harbison Township—a successful farmer and an honest and respected man.


 

JOHN C. HARDER was born in Germany, October 30, 1843, son of Fred and Margaretha Harder, who were also natives of Germany. The father was born in 1808, and came to this country in 1840, and settled in Dubois County, Ind. At the age of twenty-two John C. married Barbara Angerer of Dubois County. To them were born ten children—six sons and four daughters: John L., George, Fred, Peter, Henry E., John D., Eva (deceased), Maggie, Anna and Kathrina. Mr. Harder is quite well educated, having received a good German education. He is an ardent Democrat, and a successful farmer and prominent man of Harbison Township. He and family are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is one of the old settlers of the county and has seen the country transformed from a wilderness inhabited by numerous wild animals, to well cultivated fields and comfortable


JACOB G. CATO, one of the oldest native pioneers of the county, was born March 2, 1838 ; his parents were Green Cato and Rhoda Alley, natives of the "Old Dominion" and Tennessee, respectively. The father grew to manhood in his native State, and removed to Tennessee, where he was married and where his wife died; he was married again in that State and moved to Indiana, and located on a farm near Huntingburg He lived in various places in the county until 1800, when he removed to Pike County, where he died November 31, 1877. The mother died on the same day, three years later. Jacob received his education from the primitive log schoolhouse of early times; he remained at home until attaining his majority, with the exception of three ears, when he lived with Dr. Hughes. July 4, 1859, he married Lauretha Shively ; after marriage he moved to Spencer County, where he lived four years. In 1864 he returned to this county and located on the farm where he has since resided; he has 125 acres of good land. They have seven children : Anna, Mary E., Jacob B., Emma J., William W., Benjamin F. and Lulu B. Mr. Cato and wife are members of the Christian Church, and he is a Democrat, having held the office of assessor five years.


HERMAN DIECKMANN, undertaker and carpenter, of Huntingburgh, Ind., began working at the undertaking business about 1873; he has a fine line of goods and everything necessary for carrying on a successful business; his native country is Germany, where he was born December, 1834; he is a son of Henry Dieckmann (see sketch of Gerhard Dieckmann) ; he remained in the old country until seventeen years old, and then removed with his parents to the United States, when he learned the carpenter's trade and worked in Louisville, Ky., until 1854, when he came to Huntingburgh ; he has since worked at his trade with the exception of the time spent in the army. September 26, 1864, he was drafted for service and was enrolled in Company K., Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteers; he was with Sherman on his famous march to the sea, and through the Carolinas. November 13, 1856, he was married to Josepha Neumann, who died in 1874, having borne him eight children, six now living: Matilda, Amelia, John, Earnest, Elnora and Amelia. In 1877 he married Hannah Anthony, by whom he is the father of four children: Rosa, Wilhelmina, Frank and Theodore; he is a Democrat and member of the Lutheran Church. His wife is a Catholic.


 

 
GERHARDT DIECKMANN
, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes, Huntingburgh, Ind., began business in July, 1855, in a frame building on First Street, where he remained about one year; he then built a brick building on Third Street, where he conducted his business until about 1804, when he bought a two story brick building adjacent to his present location. This was the first brick building erected in the town. In 1870 he tore it down and erected the large two-story building where he is now doing business ; he carries a good stock of ready-made goods in addition to those manufactured by himself. Mr. Dieckmann was born in Oldenburg, Germany, in May, 1830, being the eldest of a family of two sons and two daughters, born to the marriage of Henry Dieckmann and Kate Stumberg, also natives of Germany. The father, who was a carpenter, followed his trade in his native country until 1851, when he came to the United States with his family and located in Louisville, where he remained only a short time; he then came to Huntingburgh, where he has since resided; he is now in his eighty-second year. Gerhardt was reared at home receiving a good education in his native country. At the age of fifteen he began to learn the shoe-maker's trade, serving  an apprenticeship of six years ; he then came to the United States with his parents, and engaged in business as before stated. In March, 1855, he was united in marriage with Alvina Spitzer, who died in December of the next year. He was again married, in June, 1857, to Margaret Bormann, by whom he is the father of ten children, of whom Charles, Henry, John, William, Eena Wilhelmina, Amelia and Sophia are living.


CHRISTOPHER W. DUFENDACH, merchant, of Hunting burgh, Ind., was born November 23, 1S45. son of Christopher H. and Catharine E. Dufendach ( see sketch of Henry Dufendach ). Our subject was raised on a farm in this county and received a fair German and English education. At the age of nineteen he  enlisted as a private in the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth  Indiana Volunteers, from Evansville, Ind.. where he was clerking in a store. He served his time of enlistment, 100 days, and again clerked in Evansville until 1867, when he came to Huntingburgh and engaged in the general merchandise business with his brother Henry. At the end of four years they began working at photography, continuing two or three years. He then bought out H. Bemer's merchandise store and ran it until 1870, when he and Jonas Killian built their present large brick block, and continued in the same business. In 1881 lie bought Mr. Ivillian's interest, and has conducted the business alone ever since, meeting with the best of success. In 1869 he married Sarah A. Fisher. They are the parents of five children: Edward H. David C, Nellie A.. Alfred Bismark and Charles L. He is a Republican, and has been town clerk a number of times.


 

HENRY DUFENDACH, a prominent merchant of Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of Dubois County, born October 22, 1841, is one of eight children born to Christopher and Mary Elizabeth (Wessler) Dufendach, natives of Germany. They married in the old country, and came to the United States, settling in Dubois County, Ind., where the father followed the life of a farmer. At the breaking out of the war, he bought the Union Grist-mill, in company with another man, and operated it successfully for two or three years, and then sold his interest. The mother died in May, 1872. Henry, our subject, was raised on a farm, receiving little or no education in his boyhood, but has since acquired a good, practical education by his attendance at Sunday-school, and by his own untiring efforts. At the age of fifteen he began learning the cabinet-maker's trade in Huntingburgh, but after working at it nearly three years, abandoned that business and clerked for some time in a store, and afterward worked in his father's mill about three years. He then engaged in the general merchandise business with Ernst Pickhardt, and continued in this about three years, when he sold out to his partner and engaged in the same occupation for himself on a small scale. His business increased so rapidly that he built a large brick warehouse, and the following year built his present dwelling house. In 1883 he erected his commodious brick block, and has since carried on his business with marked success. In 1873 he bought a warehouse and began buying and selling leaf tobacco, and now handles nearly 500,000 pounds annually. His tobacco house is a two-story frame building, 35x85 feet in dimensions, with a large shed addition. Since 1870, he has engaged quite extensively in pork-packing, handling from 500 to 1.200 hogs per year. February 23, 1802, he married Johanna Boehmer, who died June 20, 1872, leaving three children, two now living: Ernst 0. and Franklin H. April 20, 1873, he married Mary Schroeder, a native of Ohio. To them were born four children, three now living: Norman C. W., Cora V., and Cornelia A. Mr. Dufendach and family are members of the Evangelical Association, and he is recognized as a successful and enterprising business man and a worthy citizen.


THOMAS R. GREEN, postmaster and railroad agent at Duff, Ind., is a native of Dubois County, born May 6, 1845. He is the eldest of nine children in the family of Robert and Melissa A. (Miller) Green, also natives of the county, The paternal grandfather came to Indiana from New York at a very early day, and located near Ireland, in this county. He later removed to Jasper, where Robert Green was born and lived until seven
years old. The family then returned to the home farm and Robert, after his marriage, lived on a farm in the south part of Madison Township until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in Company E,  Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in September, 1861, and the following May died in a hospital boat on the Ohio River. The widow is still living at Ireland. She was born November 7, 1825, and is a daughter of Adam Miller, one of the first settlers of the county. Thomas R. was reared at home, receiving a common school education. He remained at home until February 7, 1864, when he was enrolled for service in Company G, Forty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served until June 11, 1865. He participated in the battles of Resaca, Kenesaw Mountain, the battles before Atlanta and the siege of that city. After his return from the war he was engaged in teaching school for eight years. He then removed to Illinois, where he remained for one year, after which he returned to this county and was engaged in farming for a few years. In September, 1881, he came to Duff and opened a general merchandise store, which he conducted until the spring of 1885. In October, 1881, he was commissioned as postmaster, and the next year was appointed agent for the L. E. & St. L. R.R. at Duff, both of which positions he still holds. October 14, 1871, he was joined in marriage with Anna Hill, who died March 26, 1878, leaving two children: Alvah E. and Nellie. He chose for his second wife, M. M. Miller, to whom he was married October 10, 1883. Mr. Green is a member of the Methodist Church, and for many years was a local preacher.

 


M. D. LEMOND. a prominent farmer and stock dealer of Dubois County was born in the county, January 28, 1842, being the oldest of eleven children born to the marriage of John B. Lemond and Abselah Miller, natives of North Carolina and Dubois County, Ind., respectively. The father, when a youth, came to the county with his parents and located on the farm where our subject now lives. After his marriage he lived on the home farm for one year, and then moved on a tract of land which he entered about three-fourths of a mile east. He lived there several years, but finally returned to the home farm, where he died September 1, 1862. The mother died in April, 1878. They were among the earliest pioneers of the county, and to such as they is due the credit of the development of the county. M. D. Lemond was reared at home receiving a common school education. He worked on the home farm until the death of his father, when he assumed  control, and has since continued to own and work it. He is now the owner of 700 acres of good land, and is probably the largest farmer in the county. He makes a specialty of stock raising, chiefly cattle. October 10, 1883, he was united in marriage with Sallie J. Harris, a native of Spencer County, and to them has been born one child, Charles B., born July 3 1884. Mr. Lemond resided at Duff Station on the Lake Erie & St. Louis Railway five miles west of Huntingburgh.

 


 

JACOB H. LEMMON, representative of one of the pioneer families of the county, was born . February 8, 1840, son of John and Elizabeth (Cimmerl) Lemmon. The father, a native of Kentucky, came to Dubois County, Ind., with his father in; 1802, and located on a tract of land near where Portersville now stands.  John was raised amid the wilderness, undergoing all the hardships of pioneer life. After marriage he followed farming, sending his products by boats down the White, Wabash, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans. His death, which occurred in 1872, was a severe loss to his many friends. He was a Republican and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Our subject received a very limited education and passed his boyhood on the farm. July 6, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He remained in the field until January, 1865, then returned home and in November, 1866, he 
married Martha Jane McMahan, who has borne him two children: McMahan and Louise. He is a stanch Republican in politics, and a member of the G. A. R. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. After marriage, Mr. Lemmon lived on the old homestead until 1872, and then purchased the McMahan farm near Duff Station, where he resided until 1883, when he removed to Huntingburgh where he has since resided. He still controls his farms and is engaged in stock raising.


CLAY LEMMON, farmer, was born December 20, 1842, in Dubois County, Ind. His parents were Elijah and Isabella ( Summerville ) Lemmon. The father was born near Portersville, Ind., in 1815, and in early life followed flat-boating on the White River, and in 1830 he entered 160 acres of land. Before dividing his land among his children, he possessed about 880 acres, and received a large income from the loan of money. July 15, 1870, he was taken from among the living, his wife having passed away in 1800. Clay was educated in the primitive schools of his day and at the breaking out of the Rebellion, he shouldered his musket with the other brave boys of Indiana, and enlisted in Company E, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, the sieges of Vicksburg and Jackson, and many others, fighting bravely for his country for over four years. After coming home, he worked on the farm until his marriage to Lucy Anderson, which occurred September 3, 1872. They are the parents of four children: Isaac B., Charles O., Earl S. and Jessie I. At his father's death, Mr. Lemmon became the possessor of the 230 acres of land, which he afterward increased to 390 acres. Both husband and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and Mr. Lemmon is a leading. Republican, having cast his first vote for Grant.

 


 

W. S. LEMMON, brother of Clay Lemmon (above written), was born March 19, 1847. in Dubois County, Ind. At the age of sixteen he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and served his country faithfully nearly two years. In March, 1804, he returned to home and friends, and he and his brother worked on the home farm until 1867, when he bought a farm of 120 acres in Pike County, which he sold fifteen years later. In 1877 he purchased the farm of 230 acres, and which he has since increased to 270 acres, 110 acres being under cultivation. November 29, 1808, he married Emma McDonald, born July 27, 1849, daughter of John and Margaret (Bacon) McDonald. They are the parents of four children: Clara I., Ira G, Eliza M. and Harley S. Mr. Lemmon and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and he is a warm Republican, who cast his first vote for Grant. He is a successful farmer, and is now the possessor of 377 acres of good land.

 


 

CAPT. JOHN M. LEMMON, one of the prominent farmers of Dubois County, was born November 22, 1837, and is a son of John and Elizabeth (Simmons) Lemmon, natives of Kentucky. The father was born in 1802, and came to this county in his youth, where he married and bought 230 acres of land and began his career as a farmer. He was among the first settlers of the county, there being only two or three families preceding him. He died in 1872, and the mother in 1841. Our subject was raised at home, but without a mother's care, she having died when be was a child of four years of age. His education was acquired in the district school near his home. He remained at home working for his father until the war broke out, when he enlisted in Company E, Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, July 6, 181)1, serving for three years. He took an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Fort Donelson, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, siege of Vicksburg and many others. He enlisted as a private, but was soon promoted to first sergeant, then was commissioned second lieutenant by O. P. Morton. He proved to be an efficient officer, and was raised to the rank of first lieutenant and then to captain, December 29, 1863, which office he retained until the close of the war. He married Vinna Parker, and bought a farm of 120 acres in Dubois County, and commenced farming. In 1881 he bought a home in Ireland. Ind.. where he has since lived. He now owns 220 acres of land, and is a successful
farmer. He is a strong Republican, and belongs to the Masonic fraternity. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.

 


 

CHARLES C McCOWN, M. D., of Ireland, Ind., was born August 23, 1856, in Harrison County, Ind., and is a son of John  N. and Ruth (Miller) McCown, who were also natives of Indiana. The father was born in 1813, and is a farmer by occupation. In 1861 he moved to Crawford County and bought 200 acres of land where he has since lived. His wife died March 19, 1883, at the age of sixty-five years. Our subject received his education in the district schools near his home, and began teaching school in 1870, and continued at that work for three years. At the age of twenty-two he commenced the study of medicine, and in 1880 entered Louisville Medical College, and graduated from that institution as. an M. D. in February, 1882. He located in Denning, Hamilton Co., Ind., and began practicing his profession. He remained there one year and then came to Dubois County, locating in Ireland. March 8, 1883, he married Lizzie Harris, daughter of John A., and Martha Harris. She was born August 28, 1861. They have one child, a daughter, named Ruth. Dr. McCown is a young man just starting in life, but he is building up a good practice. He is a Republican, casting is first vote for James G. Blaine; he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.


David Milburn

The following was written by George W. Milburn (1855-1934)

In Columbia Township live several families by the name of Milburn and annual family reunions are held. Richard  Milburn, of Boone Township, and of Jasper, who was born in Kentucky, October 24, 1832, and who was the father of former Attorney General Richard M. Milburn of Indiana, used to claim the first Milburns came to America in the good ship Mayflower. We have no evidence to cofirm this statement and none to refute it. Be that as it may, the Milburn clan of Dubois County, came this way through Virginia, Tennessee and Kentucky, and they were pioneers wherever they went. They were leading civilization in four states, and thus did their part in the development of our country.

In regard to David Milburn's ancestors it may be said, Richard Milburn, of Virginia, migrated to Kentucky in the early settlement of that state. There he reared a large family of children-- fourteen sons and  ten daughters--twenty-four in all. Just where he lived in Virginia or where he settled in Kentucky is not known to the writer. I have no data as to his birth or his death. Some of his sons' names are as follows: Jonathan, Robert, Frank, George and Thomas. I do not know any of his daughter’s names. One of them married a man by the name of Stump (John or Tom Stump).

It is Jonathan Milburn whose history we aim to follow. He was born February 3, 1792. As he grew to manhood he learned the carpenter and millwright trade. He would build and repair mills, houses, barns, etc. He was married at the age of twenty-one years to Miss Sarey Casey a daughter of George Casey. He lived in Ken­tucky for several years; lived in Louisville at one time and built the first frame house there. He moved to Indiana in the early thirties, stopping in Washington County at the town of Livonia. He lived in that county for several years. He came to Dubois County later and built a horse or tread mill west of Haysville and north of the  Haysville and Portersville road. He bought a tract of land west of Haysville and north of the James Harbison farm. He died October 26, 1853. His Wife, Sarah Casey Milburn, died January 12, 1863. They were laid to rest in the Cooper Cemetery one mile south and west of Haysville. To them were born twelve children, five sons and seven daughters, as follows: Martha, Mary Ann, Sarey, David, Israel, Margrit, Ewan, Lewisea, Elizabeth, Jonathan Jr., Nancy and John.


David Milburn the eldest son and fourth child of Jonathan and Sarey Milburn, was born February 15, 1823, in Hardin County, Kentucky, David's childhood days were spent in Kentucky, some of them in Louisville, where he would go with his mother to the market to buy groceries. He always wanted her to buy tomatoes.

While yet living in Kentucky, Jonathan Milburn took his family and went back to visit his parents in their very old Kentucky home. They made the trip on horse back. David at that time was a small boy perhaps three or four years old, just old enough to remember the going. He rode behind his sister Martha. She was carrying her little sister Nancy in her arms. Their horse fell and bumped Nancy's nose and caused it to bleed and young David thought she was about ruined.

When they arrived at the old home they found several of the other children there. It was then that Richard Milburn sent for the rest of his children to come home. He prepared for them a big family dinner saying "perhaps it would be the last time all of them would be together." They numbered one hundred at that time. The exact date of that reunion is not known, but more than a century has passed since that time, so we have an account of a Milburn reunion more than one hundred years ago. As David Milburn grew to manhood, he worked with his father and helped him build houses, barns, mills and to dig wells.

In passing from their home in Washington County to Haysville, they stopped at the home of George W. Wineinger, Sr., to stay over­night or to get meals. Miss Julia Ann Wineinger caught young David's eye. They formed a friendship which later grew into a love affair and in due time they were married at Hillham (Davis Creek) on June 14,1844.  At the same time George W. Wineinger, Jr., and Miss Nancy Milburn, (David's sister) were married. David with his young bride lived at Haysville a while, later he returned to Hillham and settled one-half mile northeast of the Dr. Line's home. Here they lived a few years; later they moved to a farm one- and one-half miles south of Hillham, where they spent the remainder of their lives, except while David was in the army.

To them were born nine children, four sons and five daughtersFive of them are living; four have passed to the Great Beyond. David Milburn lived on a farm and operated it for a liveli­hood. Occasionally he would work at carpentering. At one time he helped build a horse or treadmill for John A. Wineinger, one mile southeast of Norton, in Orange County. He helped to build the Cane Creek church house in Orange County.

 

When there were house raisings, log rollings, or sickness in the neighborhood he was ready to lend a helping hand. He also would make caskets (then called coffins) for people when one of their family would die. He used native black walnut or wild cherry lumber unless otherwise  ordered. Later he helped Alex­ander Simmons make coffins. Mr. Simmons kept a few coffins on hand so he could fill orders. David Milburn also helped Allen H. Young make coffins. He also worked at repairing wagons for his neighbors. He could make the woodwork of a wagon. He also helped to float rafts of logs and flat boats down Patoka River to market. He built sorghum mills for people. When the people of Columbia Township began to raise cane (I mean sorghum) they needed mills to crush or grind the stalks to extract the juice. One fall he built four of these mills. In later years he built other mills of this kind. He also made shoes for his family and for some of his neighbors.

 

In September, 1864, David Milburn was called to the colors of his country. He was with General Sherman's army on his memorable march to the sea and at the capture of Savannah, Georgia. He was in Company B,  25th Ind. After that the army moved north and David Milburn fell sick, and was put aboard a ship and sent to New York. He was in a hospital for a while. Later he was sent to Madison, Indiana, and put in a hospital there. When later he was discharged he had to go to  Indianapolis to get his pay. He had drawn no pay up to that time. That was in June, 1865.

 

From Indianapolis he came home arriving late in the evening. It. was getting dusk when he arrived home. The last few years of his life he was able to work but little. He drew a small pension of $14.00 per month.

The end came quietly; his mind was clear and good to the lastHe died June 4, 1894, aged 71 years, 3 months and 20 days. His remains were laid to rest in the Pace Cemetery one mile north of his home. After his death, his wife, Julia Ann Milburn, lived with her son, William Sherman Milburn on the old farm  until her death. She reached a ripe old age being at the time of her death, April 12, 1923, 96 years, 7 months and 26 days of age. She was tholdest person in Dubois County. She was laid to rest beside her husband. A beautiful blue marble stone marks their last resting place in the Pace Cemetery.  

 At this time (October 12, 1932) the descendants of David and Julia Ann Milburn number 141, as follows: 2 sons, 3 daughters, 26 grandchildren, 80  great grandchildren and 30 great-great­ grandchildren. All were living, October 12, 1932.



The following is taken from "History of Dubois County From It's Primitive Days To 1910", by George R. Wilson, published 1910.

Thomas Sherritt, a British soldier, landed in America during the American  Revolutionary War. In the course of time he became an American soldier and remained in \^Virginia at the close of the war. His son John was born in Virginia, March 27, 1785, and came to Dubois county, in 1815.

He entered land in 1S17. It is about a half mile south of the "Mud Holes." John Sherritt came to Dubois county from Louisville, with one horse loaded with merchandise. At that time William McDonald had a cabin on the "Buffalo Trace." It was about sun down when John Sherritt rode up to the McDonald cabin. There were several Indians in the cabin, and Sherritt looked upon them with some degree of fear. After McDonald assured him that they would not harm him he entered the cabin and remained over night. 

The next morning he opened up his pack of goods and traded the entire stock to the Indians for fur. He then returned to Louisville and secured another supply. Two horses were required to transport his new stock.  He entered land and upon it built the first store house in Dubois county, in 1817. On December 31, 1818, John Sherritt married Jane Brown, who was born June 2, 1800. She was the daughter of Pioneer Samuel Brown, who came to Dubois county from Virginia, in 1818, and died here the same year, of "milk sickness." John Sherritt and Jane Brown were the first couple to be married in Dubois county. Their children were, Eliza, William B., Samuel B., James W., Thomas F., Sarah Jane, Margaret Ann, and John.  

Pioneer John Sherritt was commissioned captain in the state militia June 20, 1823. Capt. Sherritt died April 1, 1849, and his remains were put to rest in the graveyard that bears his name. This graveyard is mentioned  so often that it may be well to remember that it contains about one acre of  ground, and is not under the supervision of any church. In 1909, its trustees were Henry Breidenbaugh, Lieut.Hiram McDonald and Hiram Horton.


John Pruitt, of Mentor, Ind., was born December 24, 1844, in Orange County, Ind. He is a son of John and Nancy (Grimes) Pruitt, natives of Kentucky, who came to Birdseye, Ind., about 1840, and still live there where they own eighty acres of land. Our subject's educational advantages were limited, as the schools at that time were very imperfect. His boyhood was spent on a farm, and at the age of twenty he began working on a farm of his own, where part of Mentor now stands. He continued farming until 1880, on eighty acres of land and made a success, financially. He then began the general merchandise business in Mentor, is connection with farming. He carries a capital line of goods, and is doing well. He was married in March, 1864, to Malinda A. Blunk, the result of this union being eight children, five now living: William L., Nancy M., Joseph, Charlotte and Matilda. Mr. Pruitt is a Democrat, and was township trustee for three terms, the first being in 1874 and closing in 1880. He is a leading politician and a worthy citizen.


JOHN RUCKRIEGEL, only son of George and Margaretha Ruckriegel, was born  February 2, 1841, in Dubois County, Ind. The parents were natives of Germany, and shortly after coming to this country the father died. John staid with his parents until 1864, when he enlisted in Company D, Seventy-fourth Indiana Volunteers. He fought bravely in many bloody battles, and at the close of the war returned to his native home. In 1866 he married Lizzie Brietboch, of Boone Township. To them were born these children: Maggie (deceased), Henry. Maggie. Marv, Eva, Frederick and Adam. Mr. Ruckriegel has a fair German education. In politics he is a Democrat, but liberal in his views. He and family belong to the Lutheran Church. As a business man he is very successful. He is one of the old pioneers, and a veteran soldier of Harbison Township.


  

JAMES E. SANDERS was born January 7, 1820, in Spencer County, Ind. His parents were Thomas and-Frances (Kason) Sanders. The father was a native of Tennessee and came to Indiana a short time after he was married, and was among the early settlers; he was a cripple and was obliged to rely upon James E. for the family support. James remained with his father until after he was married. His education is quite limited, his boyhood having been spent hard at work on the farm. December 17, 1844, he married Martha Heinlein, the result of their union being ten children, eight now living. For his second wife he married Sarah Messer, who bore him four children, only one now living. Our subject lived for some time on a farm west of Schnellville, Ind. He sold this and bought a farm of 160 acres two miles east of that place and commenced farming. He began life a poor boy, but by industry he became the possessor of 242 acres of good land. He has divided it among his sons and now has about thirty-five acres of his own. In politics he was a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has been one of its supporters. During the war he enlisted in Company I. Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, but served only about nine months, owing t0 sickness. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.


GEORGE COX, sheriff of Dubois County, Ind., was born August 28, 1842, and is a son of Robert and Nancy (Maxedon) Cox. (See sketch of Robert Cox of Jackson Township.) George was raised on the farm and received a fair education in the common branches. When he had attained his majority he began farming for himself in Jackson Township, where he remained about ten years and then engaged in the manufacture of shingles until 1876, when he was elected sheriff of Dubois County, and served until 1880. He next worked at the flour milling business in Portersville until the mill caught fire and was consumed in 1885. In 1884, he was elected the third time to the sheriff's office and is now acting in that capacity and giving excellent satisfaction. In 1861, he married Martha Main, who has borne him three children: Cyrenus W., Robert V. and Mary Jane. Mr. Cox is a warm Democrat, a Mason, a member of the I. O. O. F. and in all respects a good and useful citizen.


THOMAS H. DILLON, attorney at law of Jasper, Ind., was born in Pike County, Ind., June 22, 1857, and is one of six children born to James and Catharine (Haynes) Dillon, natives of Nova Scotia and Posey County, Ind., respectively. The subject of our sketch was reared with his parents in Pike County and was a farmer and miller by occupation. He received a fair education. principally by his own efforts. He prepared himself for teaching and followed that occupation four years in Pike County, meeting with good success. In 1883 he began the study of law, with a view to making it a profession. He studied for some time in Petersburg, Ind., under Posey & Wilson, and in March, 1885, he was admitted to practice in Pike County. In June of the same year he came to Jasper, where he has since lived and practiced his profession. September 5, 1877, he took for his life companion Mary Green, a native of Dubois County, Ind. They became the parents of three children: Daisy M., Bessie E. and Mabel E. (deceased). His political views are independent, and he and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Dillon 
has been fairly successful in business affairs from a financial standpoint, and is recognized in the community as one of the enterprising, successful young members of the legal profession, and an upright moral citizen.

 


 
EDWARD ERNY was born in Pittsburgh, Penn., July 17, 1840, and is the eldest in a family of eight children born to Dominic and Johanna (Kaiser) Erny, who were born in Switzerland and came to this State in 1842, and settled on a farm in Dubois County, near Jasper. One year later they moved to Jasper and the father began working at the tailor's trade. Edward was raised in Jasper, where he received a good common school education, but he passed much of his time at the old homestead. His father died in 1864 and his mother in 1880. June 22, 1869, he married Katharine Goetz and to their union eight children have been born, of which these five are now living: Albert, William, Mary, Helen, and Emma. Edward has always been a farmer and quite a successful one financially. He owns 120 acres of excellent and well cultivated land. He and family are members of the Catholic Church and in politics he is a Democrat.

 


 
MRS. T. ERNY, proprietress of the only hardware store in Jasper, Ind., succeeded to the business on the death of her husband, Wendolin Erny, who was a native of Switzerland, where he was born April 6, 1820. His parents were Benedict and Regina Erny. In 1832, Wendolin, who was about twelve years old, immigrated to the United States, and  remained for some time in Pittsburgh where he learned the tinner's trade. In 1847 he came to Dubois County and settled in Jasper where he immediately established a tinner's shop, and succeeded so well that he soon after added a hardware stock. June 13, 1848, he married Theresa Oberst, who bore him five children: Mary Ann, Theresa, Louisa, Louis and Rosa, the last four being deceased. Mr. Erny was very successful in all his business undertakings, and at his death, which occurred April 6, 1879, the community lost an honored and respected citizen whose memory will be cherished for years to come. He died in the Catholic faith. He was elected to the office of town treasurer, and in politics was a Democrat.


JACOB BURGER, Jr., trustee of Bainbridge Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born in Tuscarawas County, Ohio, April 3, 1853, son of George and Agatha Burger, who came from Germany to this country about 1859. Our subject's mother died in Ohio, when he was about two years old, and he remained with his father until he was over twenty years old. September 23, 1873, he married Caroline Regel, by whom he is the father of these six children: Edward C. J., Helen A., Matilda, Clara, Minnie and Agatha. March 3, 1883, Mr. Burger's wife was called to her long home, and April 21, 1885, his marriage with Barbara Regel was solemnized. Mr. Burger has a good, thorough education in the common branches, and in business affairs he has been very successful; he has been a farmer all his life, and owns 160 acres of well-improved land; he and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat and is filling his present office very satisfactorily.

 


 
HENRY CASSIDY
, proprietor of the Daniels House at Jasper, Ind., took charge of that hotel in April, 1885, coming from Otwell, Pike Co., Ind., where he had been engaged in the same business.  He was born in Perry County, Ind., March 11, 1848, and is a son of Thomas and Easter (Jackson) Cassidy, who were born in Kentucky, and Perry County, Ind., respectively. Henry obtained a good, common school education, and at the age of twenty years moved to Pike County, where he lived until 1884 with the exception of one year spent in Kansas. For eight years after moving to Pike County he taught school, and in the intervals between terms farmed. In 1882 he began selling agricultural implements, at which he has since continued; he has a good trade and is doing well. In September, 1870, he married Elizabeth F. Brown, by whom he is the father of these children: Robert P., Victor V. and Emma. Mr. Cassidy has the only American hotel in Jasper, and controls the patronage of almost the entire traveling public. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is in sympathy with the Greenback party.

 



BENJAMIN F. HARNED
was born in Orange County, Ind., October 9, 1844. His parents, Charles and Lucinda (Stallcup) Harned, were natives of Virginia and Indiana, respectively. They removed from Orange to Dubois County in 1847, and settled on a farm. Benjamin F. passed his boyhood days on the farm, living with his parents until his mother's death, which occurred in 1854. He then worked for different parties until 1852, when he enlisted in his country's cause as volunteer private in Company K, Sixty-fifth  Indiana Regiment, and served faithfully for three years. He fought bravely in the following important engagements: Siege of Knoxville, Tenn., Resaca and Dalton, Ga. and Cedar Creek, and was with Sherman, on his famous march to the sea. September 2, 1866, Polly, daughter of Thomas Hopkins, became his wife, and to them seven children have been born: Thomas, Emory, Flora, Dora, Belle, Gracie L. and Mirnena. In politics, Mr. Harried is a warm adherent of the Republican party, and has taken an active interest in the political affairs of the day. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Ireland Lodge No. 388, and is a highly successful farmer, owning 100 acres of good land.

 


 
NENIAN HASKINS
, recorder of Dubois County, Ind., and native of the county, was born February 5, 1844, is one of a family of eleven children born to William and Mary (Russell) Haskins, natives of Kentucky and North Carolina respectively. William came to Indiana with his father about 1812; they settled in Crawford County, where the father died. William was raised and married in that county, in 1831 or 1832 came to Dubois County, and settled on a farm near Knoxville, where he farmed ten years; he afterward located on a farm in Bainbridge Township, where he remained twenty-six years; he now resides on a farm in Jefferson Township. Our subject passed his boyhood on the farm and received a limited education in the primitive schools of his boyhood days; at the age of nineteen years he began farming and made that his exclusive occupation  until 1872, when he engaged in the cattle and butchering business, continuing in that capacity four years: he was United States mail carrier between Jasper and  Petersburg for four years, and then engaged in buying cattle and wool; he is an unswerving Democrat, in politics, and in 1882 was elected to the office of recorder, which he is filling ably and well; lie was justice of the peace from INTO to 1878, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. and A. O. U. W., and he and wife belong to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. October 12, 1803, he married Sarah Hopkins, a native of the county. They are the parents of six children: Florence. Frances, Sarah A., Felix, Edgar and Ida. Mr. Haskins is an example of the self-made man; he started in life with little or no capital, but by untiring energy and economy has succeeded in obtaining a good competency.

 


 
GEORGE FUHRMAN, a prominent citizen and Democrat of Dubois County, Ind, was born December 20, 1818. His parents, Simon and Elizabeth (Mather) Fuhrman, were born in Germany, and immigrated to the United States at an early day, settling among the dense timber land of Dubois County. The father died when George was a small lad, and owing to the necessity of working for his mother, he received a limited education. He was married, April 13, 1873, to Margaret Sendelweck, and to  their union four children were born, these three of whom are living: Maggie, John and Henry. Mr. Fuhrman is a  Democrat in politics, an intelligent and enterprising citizen, and has always followed the life of a farmer, with good success, and now owns 260 acres of good land. He and wife are worthy members of the Presbyterian Church, and have liberally contributed from their means in the support of all laudable enterprises.  



JOHN GIESLER, a well to do young farmer of Bainbridge Township, was born in this county July 27, 1855, and is the youngest child of Lorenz and Barbara (Franz) Giesler). John enjoyed the free and happy life of a farmer's boy and attended the district schools, alternating with work 01) tin' farm. At the age of seventeen years he left the •parental roof 1 and worked two years as a farm hand and then in a brewery in Jasper, until he was twenty-five years old. when he purchased his present farm and began tilling the soil, meeting with good success, financially. He has ninety acres of Land, forty three of which are under good cultivation. November PJ. 187.S, he welded Katherine Hochgesang, by whom he is the father of three children: William E., Tillie (deceased) and Leander. The family are Catholics, and lie is a Democrat and bears the reputation of being an industrious and enterprising young farmer.


 
JACOB GOSMANN, dealer in books, stationery, wall-paper, pictures, etc., established his business in September, 1880, and carries a stock valued at §2,000 and does an annual business of 1.800. Mr. Gossman is a native of York. Penn., horn February 16, 1834 and is the sixth in a family of fifteen children, born to Frederick and Mary A. ( Friedel ) Gossman. Oar subject received a common school education, mostly  obtained by close application, without the aid of a teacher. He was encaged as a country merchant on the State road between Gettysburg and Hanover, and during tin' war both rebel and Union forces passed his place of business, taking almost his entire stock. In 1864 he started for Indiana, and reached Dubois County April 15, of the same year. The following fall he began teaching and followed that occupation nine years, and saved enough money, meanwhile, to again embark in the mercantile business, at which he has had the best of success. May 13, 1830, he married Susan Neuhausel. who bore him six children, only one of whom is living. Francis Xavier. February 1L. 1879, his wife died, and October 14, 1880, he married Caroline Seger. They are the parents of two children: Annie Mary, born July 28, 1881, and Helen Marie, born August 1. 1883. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat and served three years as deputy county clerk, and is treasurer of the Building Loan Fund and Saving Association.


JACOB RAUSCHER was born in Germany, January 5, 1820, son of Daniel and Mary Rauscher, who came to this country when Jacob was a lad about ten years of age. The mother died on the voyage to this country. The father located in Stark County, Ohio, where he remained five or six years, after which he came to Dubois County and entered a tract of land near Huntingburgh, where he remained until his death. He was twice married. Jacob received little or no education. When he was about fifteen years old his father died, and he remained with his step-mother about a year, and then worked out by the month, remaining with one man three successive years, and receiving $8 per month. In payment he took eighty acres of land where he yet resides; by industry and good management, he now owns between 500 and 600 acres. In 1865, he sold his farm and moved to Huntingburgh and engaged in the milling business,  but at the end of five years, he purchased his old farm. He also owned an interest in the Star Mills of Huntingburgh, but has lately given all his attention to stock-raising. He chose for his wife, Anna M. Schavley. To them were born ten children, five now living: Isaac, William. Mary, Emma and Eva. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Lutheran Church.

 


DANIEL REUTEPOHLER, cashier of the Huntingburgh Bank, was born December 17, 1850, and is one of seven children born to Herman and Catherine ( Solman) | Reutepohler, natives of Prussia. The father a cooper by trade, came to America in 1836, locating first in Kentucky, and finally came to Dubois  County, Ind., where he has since lived, coopering and farming being his occupations. He has been very successful from a financial standpoint, and has lived in this county thirty-four years. He married our subject's mother in Ohio, in 1842 or 1843, and her death occurred in August 1855. Later, he married Margaret Mann, his present wife. Our subject passed his boyhood on the farm with his parents. He secured a fair English education, and by his own efforts is a good German scholar. At the age of twenty, he hired out as teamster to Henry Kunz, of Holland, this county, with whom he remained one year. He then worked at the same business in different parts of the county. He attended college at Berea, Ohio, one year, then returned home and sold books in the county in order to secure money to finish his education, and soon after, attended the Evansville Business College, from which he graduated in 1874. He married Margaret Kunz, and worked with his father-in-law in the  store until 1881, when he began selling drugs on hiĞ own responsibility. In 1883, he came to Huntingburgh and assumed his present position, which he has filled faithfully and well ever since. In 1876, his wife died, leaving one child, Ella Nora. He married Carrie Huenefeld in 1882. They have one child, Cora Ella. Mr. Reutepohler is a Republican, and a man who takes an interest in all private and public enterprises. He is secretary of the Huntingburgh Building and Loan Association. He and wife are members of the German Methodist Church, and he is a prominent and successful business men of Dubois County.


C. C. SCHREEDER, manager of the Huntingburgh Argus, was born January 19, 1847, in Berlin, Germany, being the only son of Charles Frederick and Mary (Arensmann)  Schreeder. His father dying, his mother, with the subject of this sketch, then a mere lad, sailed for the United States soon after, and arrived at Huntingburgh, Ind., in the autumn of 1852, where they took up their residence. About a year afterward his mother married the Rev. Frederick Wiethaup, a minister of the German Evangelical Association, and the family moved to Evansville, Ind., where Rev. Wiethaup was in charge of a congregation. From Evansville the family moved to the northeastern part of Indiana, where several years were spent in different localities. On account of the then meager school facilities of that part of the State, the opportunities of young Charles for acquiring an education were limited. In the fall of 1861 his step-father was appointed to the pastorship of a church in Dayton, Ohio, and during the family's stay in that city he attended the public schools. In the early part of the year 1863. when but sixteen years of age, he enlisted in the Rebellion, joining Company D, Second Ohio Infantry, which company was at once ordered to active duty. He served in the above company as sergeant until the following winter, when he was discharged on account of physical disabilities. During the same winter he went to Evansville, Ind., where he set in to learn the saddler*s trade, but was prevented from so doing by a continuance of ill health. In the meantime his step-father had been stationed at Huntingburgh, Ind., and his health continuing to fail, he joined his parents at that place. In January, 1865, he again enlisted in the war, this time joining .Company E, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, going from  Huntingburgh.. While in the service he at different times performed various officers 1 duties, and at Tullahoma, Term., he was detached from his company, and upon the special  election of Gen. Dudley,  placed on his body-guard in the capacity of orderly, a position which he occupied until the regiment reached Clarksville, Tenn., where the company was mounted, and engaged in scouting and ridding that section of guerrillas. While thus engaged on the 17th of August he was severely wounded, disabling him for life. He remained with his regiment, however, and did train guard duty between Clarksville and Bowling Green. The company was discharged on the 26th of October, 1865, when he returned to Huntingburgh, and spent the following winter in recuperating his broken health. He was married, April 12, 1868, to Miss Louisa C. Behrens, daughter of Herman Behrens, the first merchant of Huntingburgh. Two children—a daughter and a son—were born to them. He was then living in Evansville, where, in the year of 1868, a battalion of veterans was organized, of which he was elected lieutenant-colonel, which was quite an honor, he being only twenty-one years of age,- In April, 1870, he received the Republican nomination for city assessor of Evansville. and was elected by a large majority. In October of the same year he was elected assessor of Pigeon Township, Vanderburgh County, and held that office until 1872, when he was nominated and elected city clerk of Evansville, and was the youngest man ever elected to that responsible  position, being only twenty-five years of age. On account of his aged parents he returned to Huntingburgh in the fall of 1876. He is an ardent Republican, and takes a prominent part in the politics of the county and State, exerting much influence. In 1878 he was elected chairman of the Republican County Committee, reelected to the same position in 1880, and again in 1884. For the past fifteen years he has attended every Republican district and State convention, and in 1884 was appointed an alternate delegate from the Second Congressional District to the Republican National Convention, at Chicago. In May, 1877, he was commissioned postmaster at Huntingburgh, in which capacity he served eight years, making one of the most efficient officers in the State, the office being conducted in the most thorough business-like manner. Upon retiring from the post office he assumed entire control of the Argus, the only Republican newspaper in Dubois County, making that paper the organ of the Republicans, and also one of the best country papers in the State. He is an enthusiastic member of the G. A. R. He joined the order at Evansville, but soon organized a post at Huntingburgh, of which he was elected its first commander, and was re-elected to that position again. He now occupies the position of aid-de-camp on the staff of the department commander, with the rank of colonel.


REV. JOHN LAUTENSCHLAGER, pastor of the Lutheran Church at Haysville, was born in Wurtemburg, Germany, and came to America in 1854, residing first in Dayton, Ohio, where he remained two years. He then studied theology at the Capital University in Columbus, Ohio, four years and graduated in 1860. He began his pastoral duties in Greenville, Ohio, where he remained nine years, and then went to Irontown, Ohio, remaining there three years also, thence to Ashland, Ky., remaining six years. In 1884 he was called to Haysville where he is serving in his ministerial capacity at the present time. The constitution of the church at Haysville was framed by John Hermann, and adopted March 3, 1849 ; Christian Nix succeeded him and served twenty-nine years. He was succeeded by Bev. Bauer, who remained two years. The corner-stone of the church was laid December 15, 1867, and dedicated September 13, 1868. There are about 140 voting members, and the church and property are
valued at $3,000.


  
JACOB LEISTNER, was born on the 9th of June, 1824, in Baiern, Germany. In 1841 he left his native land and immigrated to the New World. He landed at Baltimore, Md., and finally settled in Dubois County, Ind. February 9, 1846, he was married to Elizabeth B. Heebner, a native of Baiern, Germany, and to them were born ten children—four sons and six daughters: John G., George, Adam (deceased), Conrad (deceased), Barbara A. (wife of Phillip Dilly), Margaretha (wife of Jacob Nigg),Kathrina, Mary (wife of Daniel Neukam), Elizabeth B. and Anna M. January 28, 1884, the mother departed this life. Mr. Leistner received a fair German education, and in politics he is a Democrat, and [is one of Dubois County's most successful farmers. He and family are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is an honest and respected man.

 


 

JOHN G. LEISTNER, of the firm of Dilly & Leistner, is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth Leistner (elsewhere written), he was born January 19, 1849, in Harbison Township, Dubois County, Ind., and remained with his parents on the farm until thirty-two years old. December, 1883, he married Lizzie Lottes of Harbison Township. He and wife belong to the Lutheran Church. Owing to the undeveloped schools of early times he received a limited education. In politics he is a Democrat. September, 1881, he purchased a one-half interest in a general merchandise store at Kellerville, and has worked at the business ever since. The firm is doing a paying business, and he is a good business man and excellent citizen.


CONRAD LEITZ was born December 19, 1849, in Harbison Township. At the age of twenty-one years he left home, and began working for himself. In July, 1874, he married Anna K. Grossman, a native of Harbison Township, and they became the parents of six children—three sons and three daughters: Conrad, George, Frederick, Kundel (deceased), Margaretha (deceased), and Eva. He and family are members of the Lutheran Church, and in politics he is a Republican. He is engaged in farming, and is also one of six men who have leased several farms for the purpose of mining. He has fine prospects for ore on his own farm in Harbison Township. Mr. Leitz is a farmer, but at times engages in the mason trade and carpentering. He is a member of the A. 0. U. W., and is much respected for his many good qualities.


GEORGE LEITZ was born January 14, 1851, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-five years old, assisting them on the farm. On the 30th of November, 1875, he married Margaretha Hoffmann, of Harbison Township. To them were born five  children—three sons and two daughters: Joseph P., John A., John E., Margaretha and Barbara Emeline (deceased). Mr. Leitz and family are members of the Lutheran Church, and in politics he is a Democrat of long standing. He has a good farm in Harbison Township, furnished with fair buildings. He is quite successful in business, and is much respected by all who know him.


 
 
JACOB JOCHEM, one of the enterprising young farmers of Ferdinand Township, was born February 15, 1848, in Dubois County, Ind., and is one of a family of ten children born to Nicholas And Maggie (Luer) Jochem. His father was born November 2, 1815, in Hanover, Germany, and was a farmer by occupation. He immigrated to the United States in 1847 and settled in Dubois County, where he bought 105 acres of land and where he yet lives. Our subject was reared at home, attending school for four years. He made his home with his people until he was twenty-three years old. January 31, 1872, he married Mary Stroumeyer. a native of Indiana. They have had born to them five children: Maggie, Barbara, Katie, John (deceased), and Mary (deceased). After marriage he located on eighty acres in Ferdinand Township which was given him by his father and which has since been his home. In politics he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Horace Greeley. His wife died February 28, 1882. He and family belong to the Catholic Church.



CHARLES KNAPP, wagon and carriage manufacturer, was born September 26, 1835, in Germany, and is a son of Frank and Anna M. Knapp, both of whom were also natives of Germany. His father carried on farming as an occupation, and in connection with this worked at blacksmithing. He is yet living at the age of eighty-one. His mother died in 1867. Our subject after receiving a common school education, worked in his father's shop and on the farm. At the age of eighteen he came to the United States, locating in Louisville, Ky., where he remained upward of four years, working as a blacksmith. In 1854 he removed to Spencer County, Ind., and worked in Fulda and Rockport for one year, at the end of which he came to Dubois County and settled in Ferdinand. In 1857 he bought eighty acres of land, and a year later he bought two lots in the village. September 8, 1868, he married Jacobin Hees, born May, 1838, in Spencer County, Ind., to whom were born twelve children: Martin, Mary, Lizzie, Lena, John, Theresa, Bertha, Frankie, August (deceased), Harmon (deceased), Johanna (deceased) and Rosa (deceased). By good management Mr. Knapp now owns eighty acres of land and nine lots, and five acres of land in Ferdinand. In politics lie is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Stephen A. Douglas. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church.



ANTHONY KELLER, one of the prominent farmers of Dubois County, Ind., was born January 11, 1847, in the county where he now lives. He is a son of Polycarp and Margaret  (Spann) Keller, both of whom were natives of Germany. His father followed farming as an occupation and came to this country about 1837, and lived in the State of New York a few years, when he came to Dubois County and bought 120 acres of land three miles east of Jasper where he now lives at the good old age of seventy-eight years. His wife died December 27, 1877, in her fifty-eighth year. The subject of our biography received a common school education, and worked for his parents until he was twenty-five years of age. February 8, 1870, he married Mary Rice, a native of Jasper, Dubois Co., Ind., to whom seven children were born: Mary, Frances, Katie, Anthony, Susan, Theresa and Leo Joseph. After marriage, Mr. Keller bought 239 acres of land in Ferdinand Township, where he moved and has since lived. He is a skillful and industrious farmer, and deserves his good fortune. He is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Horace Greeley. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church.


 RILEY BURTON was born in Lawrence County, Ind., March 1, 1838, he being the second son of Younger and Mary
(Higginbotham) Burton, who were natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. They were married in Louisville, Ky., and
soon after settled in Lawrence County, Ind., about 1834, where they remained until 1856, and then moved to Dubois County arid
located in Columbia Township, where they now reside. Our subject was reared and educated by his parents and remained at
home until his marriage, which occurred September 14, 1884. He married Bell Pullom, daughter of Horner and Martha Pullom,
of Orange County, Ind. Mr. Burton is an enterprising farmer and stock raiser and owns 426 acres of good land, mostly well improved with good substantial buildings. In politics he is a: warm Democrat and was elected township trustee in the spring of 1884, on the Democratic ticket, which office he still holds to the satisfaction of the people. His wife is a member of the
Methodist Episcopal Church.


 JACKSON BRIDGES, a prominent citizen of Columbia Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born January 31, 1849, and is the eldest son of Edmond and Alsada (.Pulse) Bridges, who were born in the South. About the year 1883 they located in Columbia Township, where the mother died March 28, 1883, after spending a useful life. Our subject received a good common school education and lived  with his parents, on the farm, until his marriage to Miss Sylvina M. Putnam, September 12, 1866. Mrs. Bridges is a daughter of Sylvester and Elizabeth (Pixley) Putnam, of Lawrence County, III, and was born February 1, 1848. She has presented Mr. Bridges with seven children: Sylvester (deceased), William E., Charley E., Mary (deceased), Nellie, Elizabeth E. and Sadie Florence. Mr. Bridges is a leading and active farmer, and owns 160 acres of well improved land.He is a warm Republican, and he and wife are members of the Christian Church and worthv citizens.



WILLIAM COLLINS, who was born February 8, 1829, is a son of William and Elizabeth (Wineinger) Collins, who were natives of Tennessee, where they were also married. They immigrated to Indiana in early times, and settled in Columbia Township, Dubois County, in 1826, where they afterward lived. The father was an earnest member of the Regular Baptist Church, and an excellent citizen. Our subject received such education as could be obtained in the schools of his boyhood, and remained at home aiding his father on the farm until his marriage with Christina Wineinger, June 3, 1849. To them were born these children: Mary M , Felix, John. Timanza (wife of Nicholas Howe), Sarah and Betsey. Mr. Collins, by good management and industry, owns a good property of 160 acres of excellent land with good buildings and improvements. He is a staunch Democrat and a prominent and useful citizen.



JOHN PENDLAY, a native of Lincoln County Ky„ was born June 1, 1831, and is the second son of Joshua and Jane A. (Darter) Pendlay, natives of Virginia, where they were married. They soon after settled in Kentucky, where the father died. Some years later the mother came to Indiana and died in Lawrence County of that State. Our subject received a limited education, and followed farming as an occupation. February 2, 1854. he wedded Matilda J., daughter of Stephen and Susan ( Higgenbotham) Owens of Wayne County, Ky. This lady has presented her husband with ten children, namely: Giles (deceased). Andrew J., Nancy D., Samuel W. L., Lemuel R., Martin S., Theodore, Alonzo. Malinda F. and Nora B. Mr. Pendlay is a wide-awake farmer and owns 279 acres of first-class land. During the Rebellion his patriotic feelings were aroused, and he enlisted in Company B, One Hundred and Forty-Fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, January 20, 1864. February 1, 1855, he was discharged, owing to expiration of service. Mr. Pendlay is a Democrat in politics and an esteemed citizen.


 BENJAMIN A. SIMMONS was born in Columbia Township. Dubois Co., Ind., March 11. 1845. He was one of five children born to Benjamin and Hester Simmons, natives of Washington County, Ind. Soon after marriage they settled in Columbia Township, Dubois County, where the father died in 1844. The mother is still living and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She was married twice. Her last husband being William Harris. Our subject was raised by his mother and step-father and remained with them until the breaking out of the Rebellion, when be enlisted in his country's cause November 14, 1864, in Company E, Twenty-fourth Regular Indiana Volunteer Infantry. He was discharged at Galveston, November 17, 1865. Returning home he married Elizabeth Harmon, born December 25, 1843, and daughter of Asa and Nancy ( Sullivan ) Harmon, of Orange County, Ind. Their nuptials were celebrated February 11, 1866. Six children were born to this union: America T., William G., Charles N., Henry S. John W. and Porter A. Mr. Simmons is a farmer and stock raiser, and owns 280 acres of land with good buildings and improvements. He is a Republican and has served the township six years as assessor. He is a well known and respected citizen, and he and wife are  members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


DAVID G. ABELL (deceased), was a native of Crawford County, Ind., born December 10, 1829. He was one of thirteen children born to Francis and Elizabeth Abell. When he was six years old his father died, and he came with his mother to Dubois County. They located near Ferdinand where they lived about eight years after which they removed to Jackson Township and bought the farm upon which he resided until his death, April 28, 1881. He was a very successful farmer, and at his death, he owned 220 acres of land which is now managed by his son Jasper N. In 1851 he married Jane Dameron, who died two years later. He chose for his second wife Katharine Bretz, a native of Germany, whom he married in October, 1855. To their union were born ten children, Jasper N., born September 10, 1856; Maggie, born August 16, 1858; Mary E., deceased; David, born January 29, 1862; Anna, born June 6, 1864; William T., born December 10, 1865; Sarah, deceased; Jacob, born June 30, 1869; George E., born March 5, 1871, and Peter S., born November 23, 1873. Mrs. Abell is a member of the Christian Church, and the family is universally respected and esteemed by the community in which they live.


 
GEORGE BRENNER, a native of this county, was born in Jackson Township, July 8, 1845. He is one of two surviving children born to John and Anna (Miller) Brenner, both natives of Germany. The father, who had been previously married, came to America in 1840, and located in Harrisburg, Penn., where he worked at his trade of shoe-making for about three years. His wife died in that city, and he married the mother of our subject. After working one year in Pittsburgh he came to Dubois County, and located on a farm in Jackson Township, where he died in 1863. George was reared at home, receiving only a limited amount of instruction in the schools. In 1864 he went to Tell City, Ind., and w worked at brick-molding the greater part of the time for several years. In 1869 he opened a brickyard at Ferdinand, this county, which he operated for a short time. He was also a resident for a short time of Owensboro, Ky. In 1872 he came to St. Anthony, where he was engaged for three years in the retail liquor business. He has since been engaged in operating a saw-mill. In connection with his other business, he has had considerable experience as a solicitor, selling papers, sewing machines, fruit trees, etc. November 17, 1868, Mr. Brenner was united in marriage with Eva Gilles, by whom he is the father of six children, only three of whom are now living. They are William, Theodore and Frederick N. Mr. Brenner is a Democrat in politics, and is one of the well informed men of the township.


PHILIP BRETZ, a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, was born July 13, 1836, being the third of ten children born to the marriage of Philip J. Bretz and Ann M. E. M. Frick, also natives of Germany, from which country they came to the United States in 1840, and located on a farm in Jackson Township, Dubois Co., Ind., where the father died in 1884, at the age of eighty years. The mother is still living. Philip remained at home until attaining his majority, receiving but little instruction in school. He has, however, obtained a fair education through his own efforts. For many years he spent the greater part of his time in hunting. January 4, 1879, he was united in marriage with Margaret Bretz, a  daughter of William Bretz. He has since been engaged in the retail liquor business at Bretzville. He has three children: Charles W.. P. J. Edward and Gertrude. Both he and wife are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and is one of the well informed men of the township.



JOSEPH FRITZ
, one of the enterprising farmers of Dubois County, was born in the county, February 14, 1843, being one of a family of four sons and three daughters born to the marriage of John Fritz and Mary TJ. Block, natives of Alsace, Germany. The father, when a young man, came to the United States, and located at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he worked at various kinds of work until about 1840. In that year he came to Dubois County, and bought the farm where he resided until his death, which occurred November 9, 1879. The mother died June 28, 1871. Joseph was reared at home, receiving a good education, obtained mainly through his own efforts. September 26, 1864, he entered the service of his country, and was enrolled in Company K, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which regiment he served until June 4, 1865. He was with Sherman on his famous march to the sea and through the Carolinas. After his return from the war he began farming on the home farm. He was married, January 8, 1867, to Josephine Kessler, a native of the county, and to them have been born eight children. Those living are Joseph J., Susanna C, Anna M., George, Adam, Frank J., Michael and Katharine. Both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church. Politically Mr. Fritz is a Democrat, and has been trustee of the township for two terms.



JAMES M. BARTON, cashier of the Dubois County Bank, at Jasper. Ind.. was born in Madison County. Ind., October 29, 1859. being one of a family of eight children born to William Barton and Sinai Harmon, who were natives of Virginia and Indiana. Our subject was raised in his native county, and received a very good education. He learned the banking business in his father's bank at Ellwood, and held the position of teller and book-keeper there until his father's death in 1876. He was then book-keeper in Fremont, Ohio, for about eighteen months, when he returned to his native county and completed his schooling, and in 1882, engaged in the grain business in Anderson, Ind., until 1883, when he came to Jasper, and accepted his present position in the banking house of that place, which position he fills admirably. He is an enterprising business man, and is sure to succeed.


 
JOHN BETZ, proprietor of the Union Hotel, in Jasper, Ind., was born in Kentucky, August 26, 1846. His parents were John and Elizabeth (Mehringer ) Betz, who were natives of Prussia, Germany, and came to this State and county at a very early date.They moved to Kentucky, and remained there about twelve years. Our immediate subject was raised principally in this county, on a farm, where he remained until eighteen years old. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, but was not called into active service owing to the close of the war. He afterward worked in a brewery, and April 27, 1869, he married Mary Schiffhauer, They became the parents of eight children, five of whom are living: Frank, Charles J.. Mary E.. Pretonilla F. and one unnamed. The year following his marriage, he embarked in his present business, at which he has since continued, with the exception of about six  months. He is a Democrat, and he and his family are members of the Catholic Church. Mr. Betz is a live business man, and takes an active interest in political affairs.



JOHN GRAMELSPACHER & CO., proprietors of the Jasper Planing-mills, and wholesale and retail dealers in rough and dressed lumber, established their business in 1871 on a much smaller scale, having invested about $5,000, and doing an annual 
business of about $8,000. They now have about $25,000 invested, and will do this year (1885) about $60,000. John Gramelspacher, senior member of the firm, and native of Jasper, Ind., was born December 15, 1845, son of Joseph and Sophia (Freidman) Gramelspacher, natives of Germany, who came to this State in 1837, where the father died October 17, 1853. When John was twelve years of age, he went to Owensboro, Ky., where he remained until the breaking out of the war, and then enlisted in the Confederate army, remaining with them sixteen months, when he deserted, and joined the Union forces, enlisting in Company E, Second Battalion, Fifteenth United States Infantry. He served three years, and was in the battles of Bridgeport, Ala., Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Buzzard's Roost, Kenesaw Mountain, and numerous others. After his final discharge he engaged in the retail drug business in Jasper, Ind., which he continued two years. Until 1871 he was engaged in diverse occupations, when he embarked in his present business. September 11, 1866, he married Franziska Dupps, who bore him four children, three of whom are living: George, Anna and Gustave A. Mr. Gramelspacher is a member of the Masonic Lodge of Ireland, Ind. He is a Democrat, but very liberal in his views. He is very successful in business undertakings, and is much respected throughout the community.



 PETER J. GOSMANN, clerk of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Pennsylvania. July 27, 1843, son of Frederick and Mary Ann (Friesdl), natives of Germany. They came to the United States about 1835, and located in Pennsylvania, where the father practiced medicine until 1804, when he came to Dubois County, Ind.. and practiced his profession until his death, in 1870. Peter was raised in Germany, and at the age of fifteen, learned the cigar-maker's trade, which he followed four years. Eater, he followed these various occupations: clerking, teamster and suttler's clerk in the army, farming, and later, obtained a position in the commissary department of the Government. He lived for some time in Philadelphia, and, in 1866, came to Dubois County, and worked at teaming and merchandising with a brother for four years. He taught school three winters, and, in 1871, engaged in merchandising for himself, in Marion Township. In 1873, he engaged in the same business in Celestine, remaining there until 1877, when he came to Jasper, and entered upon his duties as clerk. He served four years, and was re-elected in 1880. May 23, 1871, he married Anna M. Segers. They are the parents of seven children, one son deceased. He and family are members of the Catholic Church.



CLEMENS HENKEY is a native of Dubois County, Ind., born September 20, 1847, and is a son of Bernhard and Agnes (Bulles ) Henkey. The father came from Germany  to the United States about 1840 and settled near Dayton, Ohio, where he followed the watch-maker's trade; later he came to this county and  purchased a farm in Marion Township, where he remained until 1880, when he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he now resides, in his eighty-fifth year; he is living with his fourth wife, the first three having died, and has been the father of twenty-six children by the four wives. Clement was raised a farmer, secured a fair education in youth, and when twenty-seven years old married Margaret Guender, and settled on his present farm of seventy acres; he is the father of four children: Elizabeth, John, Mary and Theresa; he is a Democrat in politics, and an upright, industrious citizen, whom to know is to respect and esteem.


  

FRANK HOPKINS, farmer, was born February 25, 1853 and is the youngest of six children born to Thomas and Rachel (Harris) Hopkins. Thomas came to this State from Tennessee about half a century ago, and was among the earliest settlers of the county. He chose for his home a farm about three miles from Jasper. Here he died when our subject was but two years of age. Frank remained at home and helped his mother on the farm, and owing to this and the poor facilities of the day he received a limited education. In 1870 they removed to the farm now occupied by him, and August 3, 1879, Alice Mathews became his wife. They became the parents of two children, only one now  living, Porter. Mr. Hopkins has always made farming his occupation and has succeeded well in that pursuit. He now owns 120 acres of good land, and is on the road to wealth. He is a Republican and always manifests a lively interest in the political affairs of the county and community in which he lives, where he is considered an enterprising and rising farmer.


 

W. S. HUNTER, attorney, of the firm of Traylor & Hunter, of Jasper, Ind., was born in Pennsylvania, December 22, 1848, son of Robert and Emily (Callen) Hunter, natives also of Pennsylvania. The father who was of Scotch-Irish descent came to Indiana in 1858 and settled in Perry County where he farmed and taught school. Winfield S., our subject, received a good education, and at the age of fifteen enlisted as a private in Company L, Thirteenth Indiana Cavalry, serving in the Army of the Cumberland over two years. At the close of the war he returned home and taught school until about 1874, meanwhile studying law with the view to making it a profession. In 1875 he was admitted to the Perry County bar, and graduated from the law department of the State University of Bloomington, Ind. In 1876 he came to Jasper, and practiced his profession two years, and   later entered into partnership with Mr. Traylor. They are doing the leading legal business of the county. September 22, 1875, he married Isabel Gladish, a native of Pike County, Ind. They have four children—two sons and two daughters. He is a Republican and a member of the Masonic fraternity.


MATHIAS KLINGEL was born in Dubois County, Ind., February 23, 1845, and is the third in a family of ten children born to John P. and Theresa (Reiling) Klingel, who came from Germany to this State in 1841. Our subject remained at home, working on the farm, until he was twenty-two years old. He received a fair education in the common schools of his native State, and February 26, 1807, his marriage with Mary A. Sander was solemnized. To their union one child has been born, Theodore, born September 15, 1869. After his marriage, he, in partnership with his brother, established a saw and grist-mill about five miles east of Jasper, continuing there seven years. In the spring of 1885  he removed to Jasper and purchased an interest with Mr. Seibert in the shingle and barrel manufacturing business, at which he has since continued. They have been very successful in their business ventures, and, being of an enterprising spirit, have every indication of being one of the best firms in the vicinity. In politics Mr. Klingel is a Democrat, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 
ANDREW KREMPP, son of Andrew and Mary (Straus) Krempp, was born in Baden, Germany, January 9, 1836. He received a good education in the schools of his native land, also a good schooling in France in the English language. He learned the baker and confectionery trade. In 1864 he came to the United States, landing at New York, where he remained about five months, and then went to St. Louis and remained there about  the same length of time, when he volunteered his services as baker for the Government for six months, but, on account of the war closing, he did not remain that long. He staid for some time in St. Louis, and from there moved to Tell City, Ind., thence to Troy, thence back to Tell City, and then came to Jasper in 1876, where lie has since resided. Louisa Ledig became his wife October 26, 1866. They are the parents of seven children: Lena, Charles, Andrew, Conrad, George, Carrie and Alfonso. In 1880 he established a pop manufactory. He has been very successful in his enterprises, and is now running a fancy grocery store, in connection with his manufactory. He owns 22 acres of good land, partly within the town corporation. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is an A. O. U. W. and a Democrat.


 
FELIX LAMPERT, blacksmith and manufacturer of wagons, carriages and plows, of Jasper, Ind., was born in Baden, Germany, March 1834 and is the younger of a family of two children who were brought by their parents to the United States when our subject was but three years of age. They settled immediately in this county and State and began farming. At the age of nineteen Felix came to Jasper and learned the blacksmith's  trade and for some time worked in St. Louis and at other points. He settled permanently in Jasper in 1856 and worked the first five years as journeyman, with Sebastian Kuebler. He began business for himself in 1861. May 30, 1859, he married Helena Bretz and they became the parents of twelve children, eight of whom are living: William J.. Edward, Isabella. Caroline, George, Charles, Frank and Otho. Our subject started in business  on a small scale, but now has the best manufactory in town. He is a Democrat and he and wife belong to the Catholic Church.


 
FRANK LECHNER
. a son of Frank and Mary (Fritsch) Lechner. and one of three children, was born in Baden, Germany, October 5, 1823. The father, who was a native of France, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war in that country, being a member
of Napoleon's army. He was afterward engaged as stage driver, and had the honor of having the Emperor ride with him when he was on a trip to Prussia. March 31, 1837, the family took passage for America, landing at New Orleans. They came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and later came to Jasper, via Troy. Here they settled on the farm where our subject now lives. Seven years after their arrival the mother died, and about five years later the father's death occurred. Frank was raised on a farm, but received no English education. February 7. 1848, Mary Wagner became his wife, and to them ten children have been  born; only Frank, Conrad, Peter, Joseph, Felix, Mary, Maggie, Alice and Adam now living. Frank has been a farmer all his life, and by good management now owns a farm of 500 acres of good land. He is identified with the Democratic party, and he and wife are members of the Catholic church.


ANDREW MEHRINGER was born in Bavaria, Germany, November 20, 1829, and is the next eldest in a family of seven children born to Andrew and Margaret (Dearhoff) Mehringer. In 1834 they learned of the advantages to be gained by coming to the new world, and accordingly they and a family by the name of Spindler came here to seek their fortunes, and were the first families known to have left that province for America. They  landed at Baltimore, and came as far as Cincinnati, Ohio, where Andrew Mehringer, Sr„ left his family and came on to Dubois County, Ind., and purchased land, making the entire trip there and back on foot. Our immediate subject made his home with his parents until he was seventeen years old; he then went to work as a gardener at Louisville, where  he lived until 1854, when he returned to Dubois County, and has ever since resided. In September, 1853, he married Mary Schwerer, and to them one child was born—John F. In October, 1855, Mrs. Mehringer died, and September 30, 1856, he took for his second wife Kathrina Brosemer, by whom he is the father of eleven children, ten of whom are living Joseph A., Henry S., Lawrence L., Josephine, Lizzie, Katherine, Antony, Mary, Rosa, and Lucy. Mr. Mehringer has succeeded well as a farmer, and now owns 128 acres of well improved land. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat, and haft been appointed sheriff twice, and acted as deputy sheriff for about twenty-four years.


 
JOHN F. MEHRINGER, brother of Joseph A., was born March 30, 1855. He was reared on a farm in this county, with his parents, and obtained a fair education in the common schools near his home. He remained at home, following a farmer's life, until August 30, 1881, when he married Elizabeth Bretz, native of Dubois County. In February, 1882, he engaged in the drug business with his brother, Joseph A., whose sketch follows this. Mr.  Mehringer is a Democrat in politics, and was town treasurer two years. He is the father of two children: Frank J. and Ernest H. He and wife are members of the Catholic faith, and he is esteemed by the community for his many excellent business and social qualities.


 
JOSEPH A. MEHRINGER
, druggist, of Jasper, Ind., was born July 19, 1857, son of Andrew and Kathrina (Brosemer) Mehringer. ( See sketch of Andrew Mehringer. ) Joseph A. was raised in this county, and received a fair German and English education. At the age of fourteen, he engaged in the drug business as clerk for Martin Friedman, at Jasper, and remained with him three years. He then attended the Louisville College  of Pharmacy, and received a diploma from there in 1881. He afterward clerked in various places until 1882, when he engaged in the drug business in partnership with his brother John. They have a well-stocked store, and are doing a thriving business in Jasper. In 1882 he was elected a member of the American Pharmaceutical Association, of which he is still a member. June 19, 1883, he married Rosa E. Friedman, a native of Jasper. He is a Democrat, and he and his wife are members of the Catholic Church.



GEBHARD F. REYLING was born in Dubois County, Ind., May 24, 1850, and is one of two surviving children born to George A. and Monica (Oberst) Reyling, who were born in Germany, and came to this country at a very early day. They were among the first settlers of the county, and first located about four miles east of Jasper, where the father established a mill on the Patoka River, and operated it until 1875, when he sold out and removed to Jasper. Here our subject was raised and educated, and at the age of seventeen years, he began learning the cabinet-maker's trade, at which he continued until he had attained the age of twenty-three years. June 15, 1876  his marriage with Lucy Eckstein was celebrated. They became the parents of four children: George J.. Mary. Theodore and Helena. Since his marriage he has followed the occupation of farming, and has been quite successful. He now owns 234 acres of well improved laud. He is a Democrat, and the family belong to the Catholic Church.


 
 ANDREW SCHULER, member of the firm of M. Scheirich, Schuler & Co., is a native of Dubois County, Ind., and was born September 21. 1851, and is the younger of two children born to Joseph and Elizabeth (Schitter) Schuler, who were natives of Pennsylvania and France, respectively. They were among the first settlers of the county. Our subject's mother died when he was but eighteen months old and his father soon remarried. Andrew remained at home until he was twenty-six years old and assisted his parents. He received a good common school education. February 18, 1879, his marriage with Mary T. Reyling was solemnized. To their union were born three sons: Theodore, Albert, and Emil. Mr. Schuler’s  present occupation is merchant milling at which he is very successful. He and family are members of the Catholic church and he is a Democrat.


 
JOSEPH SCHULER
a prominent citizen of Dubois County Ind., was born in Pennsylvania, February 14, 1821, and is a son of Ptolemy and Rosa Schuler who were natives of Austria and Switzerland, respectively. They came to the United States in 1816 with the understanding that they were to come over free, but were to work their passage after their arrival in this country. The father was sold to work for three years to pay the debt, but at the end of two years his purchaser died and he was then liberated. He located  in Pennsylvania where he remained over ten years and then came to this State and county in the fall of 1837, and located on a farm near Jasper. Joseph remained on the farm until he was twenty-seven years old, and August 10, 1849, he married Elizabeth Schitter, by whom he is the father of these two children : James and Andrew. March 16, 1853, Mrs. Schuler died, and July 18, 1853, he led to Hymen's altar Mary E. Bowshert. They are the parents of seven living children: Joseph, Helena, William, Rosa, Henry, Mary and Frank. Mr. Schuler is a Democrat and has held the office of county commissioner. He and family are Catholics and he is a well to do farmer and owns 400 acres of well improved land.



JOSEPH F. SERMERSHEIM, jeweler, of Jasper, Ind., was born February 1, 1852, and was raised at home, where he remained until he was eighteen years old, when he went to Evansville, Ind., and learned the jeweler's trade. He remained there two and a half years, and then went to Louisville, Ky., where he remained over a year, and then returned to Jasper and embarked in his present business for himself. He carries a $2,000 stock, and does an annual business of about $1,000. He has a first-class line of goods, and is doing a good trade. June 27, 1876, he married Miss P. Burger. They are the parents of two children: Joseph J. and Charles. Himself and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat. He was postmaster for two years under Hayes' administration, and has been a member of the town council five years.


 

LOUIS SENG, Jr., is proprietor of the Depot Hotel, Jasper, Ind. The business was originally established by J. B. Kessner, and was subsequently owned by diverse parties until the year 1882, when it was purchased by its present proprietor, who was born in Dubois County, Ind., October 3, 1855, and is the fourth in a family of twelve children born to Louis and Elizabeth (Hoffman) Seng, who were natives of Germany and came to this country at a very early period. Louis worked on the farm until he was twenty-one years old and then worked at teaming one year, and then clerked for three years, and in 1880 entered into partnership with J. Lehrburger & Co., continuing with them until 1882 when he commenced his present business. He has been very successful and has a good trade. April 13, 1883, his marriage with Annie Bacher was solemnized They became the parents of one child, Joseph L. Mr. Seng is a Catholic and his wife is a member of the Lutheran Church. He is a Democrat and is well educated in the common school branches.


 

AUGUST SONDERMANN, of the firm of Sermersheim & Co., dealers in general merchandise at Jasper, Ind., was born March 19, 1836, and is one of four children born to Anton and Josepha Sondermann, natives of Germany, where the father died in 1839. The mother married again and came to the United States, locating in Ferdinand, Dubois Co., Ind., about 1875, where she died in 1880. August was raised in Germany and farmed there until 1854 when he came to the United States, and farmed with an uncle two years and then began clerking in a store in Ferdinand, where he remained six years.  1863 he came to Jasper and engaged in the brewery business with his father-in-law, and three years later he began clerking for him in the general merchandise business. Since the death of his father-in-law in 1876, he has conducted the business in connection with his mother-in-law. They have an excellent stock of goods and are doing a thriving business. In 1863 he married Maria Sermersheim, who died in 1873, leaving two children: Albert and Josephine. Mr. Sondermann is a Democrat and a member of the Catholic Church.


 

EDWARD STEPHENSON, a prominent citizen of Jasper, Ind., was born January 7, 1823, and is the eldest of seven children born to David and Catherine ( Dickerson ) Stephenson, who were natives of Maryland and Alabama, respectively. Edward  remained at home with his parents until he attained the age of twenty years. He was educated in the common schools of the county, and also attended the Corydon Seminary for some time. In 1841 he began studying medicine with A. M. Jones, of Corydon, Ind., with whom he remained until 1843, when he removed to Crawford County and embarked in the practice of medicine for himself. In 1845 he came to Dubois County, of which he has been a resident ever since. In 1847 he gave up practicing his profession on account of poor health, and entered the county clerk's office as deputy, serving there until January, 1850. April 18, 1850, his marriage with Missouri Edmonston was solemnized; to them were born ten children, only three of whom survive: Theodore, Edward E. and Solon. After marriage he again resumed his profession, but in 1800 he again abandoned it and removed to a farm northeast of Jasper where he remained until 1873, and then returned to Jasper where he has since resided. His wife died December 14, 1872. In politics he has always been an uncompromising Democrat; he was honored by an election to the office of county treasurer five terms. His name was very prominently mentioned in the papers throughout the State at one time as State treasurer. In 1853 he was  commissioned treasurer of the Indiana Swamp Land Fund, by Gov. Joseph A. Wright.


 

JOHN STOUT, junior member of the firm of Joh$ Gramelspacher & Co., was born in Harrison County, Ind., April 11, 1851, son of Jacob and Louisa (Helman) Stout. At the age of seventeen he left his home and went to Louisville, Ky., to learn the carpentering trade. He remained there two years, having masteredthe trade in that time. He started South and located first in Nashville, Term., where he remained nine months, and then returned to Louisville for one year, going thence to his native county, and afterward lived three years in Indianapolis, Ind., thence to Louisville; thence to Cloverport, and finally settled in Jasper where he has since lived. In 1881 he entered into partnership with Mr. Gramelspacher, and since that time has continued in the lumber trade. June 23, 1885, he married Elizabeth Sang. They are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat, but votes for the best man irrespective of party.


 
ANDREW M. SWEENEY
, superintendent of schools of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, November 26, 1853, being one of a family of nine children born to Michael and Harriet (Reade) Sweeney, natives of Ireland. In 1850 the father came to the United States and located in Cincinnati where he was employed as railroad contractor, and where he still resides. He has been engaged in the same business in Indiana, Illinois, Kentucky and Ohio, ever since coming to America. Andrew M. was raised in Cincinnati, and when ten years old began working for his father on the railroad, continuing with him until fifteen years old when he began attending school in Teutopolis Ill., then attended St. Meinrad's College in Spencer County, Ind. When about nineteen years old he began teaching the "young idea" in Dubois County, and the following year accepted a position as principal of the Jasper schools, working in this capacity for about eight years. August 5, 1878, he married Helen Kuebler a native of Jasper, the result of this union being four children, two now living: Robert K. and Clarence C. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.  Since April 4, 1883, Mr. Sweeney has been president of the Southern Indiana Teachers Association.


 
WILLIAM A. TRAYLOR, attorney at law, of Jasper, Ind., was born February 5, 1843, son of Jesse Traylor and Jane Mc- Donald, natives of Pike and Dubois Counties. The father who was of English descent, came to this county about 1844, and settled near Portersville, on a farm, where he has since resided.  William A. was raised on a farm in this county, and received a fair education in his boyhood. He prepared himself for a teacher under a private tutor, and followed this profession for six years. He studied law meanwhile under Adams & Buettner, and Maj. Carr, of Jasper, for a number of years, and then attended the law school of the State University, at Bloomington, from 1867 to 1868, graduating from there the latter year. March, 1867, he opened a law office in Jasper, where he practiced, and then entered into partnership with W. S. Hunter. They are among the leading practitioners of the county. From 1878 to 1882 he was a member of the State Senate, and was elected without an opposing candidate. He is a Democrat, and a member of the I. O. O. F. May 7, 1873, he married Flora E. Hobbs, native of Indiana, the result of this union being six children—two sons and four daughters.


 
TOLIVER WERTZ
, M. D., of Jasper, Ind., was born in Pennsylvania, April 11, 1838, being the youngest of seven children born to Henry Wertz and Sarah Ann Abrahams, natives of Pennsylvania and England, respectively. They made their home in Pennsylvania, where they passed their lives. Our subject was raised on a farm in his native State, receiving a good literary education, completing an academic course. He followed the occupation of farming until he was twenty-five years old, and taught
school one year, when he began the study of medicine, attending Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, in 1864 65. He then came to Warrick County, Ind., where he practiced at Boonville, until 1871, and then came to Jasper, where he has been engaged in attending to a reasonably large and remunerative practice. In 1878 he returned to the above named medical college, and received a diploma from there in 1879. He is a Mason, and, although not a member of any church, was raised in the Protestant faith.


 
MICHAEL WILSON, a prominent and well-known citizen of Jasper, Ind.. is a native of Northumberland, England, born October 3, 1834, and is the elder of two children born to Anthony and Ann ( Pratt) Wilson. Our subject lived in England until he was sixteen years old, and received a limited education. His mother died when he was three years old, and, in 1850, he came with his father and family to the United States, landing at New York, and soon after went to Hawesville, Ky., where they remained six years. During this time he made a prospecting trip with his uncle to the Cumberland Mountains, and afterward moved across the Ohio Eiver, to Cannelton, Ind., where he lived until I860, when he came to this county, where he has ever since lived. He immediately opened a coal mine, the first in the county, and has been engaged in that business ever since. November 1, 1862, he married Elizabeth Chilton, by whom he is the father of four children: George R, William A., Margaret A., and Thomas B. Success has attended his efforts in the development of the coal industries of the county. He recently disposed of his mine, and is now drilling for another. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are members of the Episcopal Church, and he is a Democrat, and was elected to the office of county surveyor.


 
FREDERICK ARENSMANN, one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Planing-mill, was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1818, and came to the United States in 1842, and located in Huntingburgh, Ind., where he worked for Col. Jacob Geiger, on the farm and in the mill, three or four years. He then purchased a farm near Huntingburgh, where he lived about fifteen years. At the breaking out of the war he bought a grist-mill, which he operated nearly three years, then engaged in general merchandise, and also ran the Huntingburgh woolen-mills a year or two. He then retired from active work until about 1870, when he bought an interest in his present business, in which he has remained eversince. He has been very successful in business affairs, and now has a comfortable competency. Just before leaving his native country, he married Mary Engel. They are the parents of seven children: Mary, Anna, Henry, Elizabeth, Caroline, Matilda, and Daniel. Mr. Arensmann is a Republican in politics, and he and family are members of the Evangelical Association.


 
VALENTINE BAMBERGER, manufacturer and dealer in boots and shoes at Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Dubois County, January 22, 1850, son of Peter and Catherine (Frick) Bamberger, natives of Germany. The father came to the United States about 18.30, and located on a farm in Dubois County, where he lived until 1881, when he retired from business, and now resides in Huntingburgh. The mother died in 1863. Our subject received a good German and English education, and lived on the farm until he was fifteen years old, when he began learning the shoe-maker's trade of Frederick Hildebrand, staying with him about four years. He then worked at his trade in various places, and in 1872 engaged in his present business for himself. He carries a fine line of goods, and has met with the best of success. In 1872 he married Wilhelmina Hildebrand. They have five children living: John Louis, Anna Johanna, Clara Kathrina, Philip Leo, and Emma Amelia. Mr. Bamberger is a Democrat, and a member of the town council. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


 
PHILIP BAMBERGER, dealer in stoves and tinware at Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of the county, was born March 4. 1855, and is a son of Peter and Catherine (Frick) Bamberger. (See sketch of Val. Bamberger.) His boyhood was passed on the farm, and while there he received but a limited education, but by contact with business life he has overcome this deficiency. At the age of fifteen years he began learning the tinner's trade at Rockport, Ind., remaining there nearly three years. He returned home in 1874 and worked at his trade in Huntingburgh until 1881, and then worked in Boonville one year, and in 1882 returned to Huntingburgh, where he has remained ever since, and doing well financially. August 13, 1876, he married Joanna Hildebrand, daughter of Fred  Hildebrand, whose sketch appears in this work. They have three children: Edward T., Emma W. and Charles P. He is a Democrat in politics and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


 
LOUIS BEHRENS, son of Herman Behrens and Phillipina Lieber, both natives of Germany, was born February 24, 1853, in Huntingburgh, Ind. The father came here when a young man, about 1828 or 1830. He was engaged for some time in the merchandise business, together with pork-packing, cattle trading and farming. He was noted for his generosity throughout the county. He died in 1862. Louis worked on his father's farm until he was eighteen, when he learned the wagon-maker's trade, and in 1874 began manufacturing wagons and buggies in Huntingburgh, in connection with his brother Jacob. In 1877 Jacob died, and between 1876 and 1881 his brothers Frank and Frederick were with him as partners. In 1882 they commenced selling agricultural implements and are now meeting with the best of success. Louis married Eliza Miller in 1877. They have had four children: Nora P., Sophia Kate, John H. (deceased) and Walter John. Mr. Behrens is a faithful Democrat and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


ERNST JACOB BLEMKER, Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Prussia, July 4, 1829, and is an only child of Jacob W. Blemker, a native of Germany. The mother died in 1830 and the father immigrated to the United States in 1836, locating in Lexington, Ky, and in 1848 came to Dubois County, Ind., where he resided a number of years. He now resides near Huntingburgh, having married Mary Ann (Geiger) Dunn. After his mother's death, our subject was raised by an uncle and received a fair education in German. At the age of fifteen he came to the United States and lived on a farm near Lexington, Ky., until he was eighteen years old when he came to Dubois County and learned grist milling at which he worked four years. He then learned the tanner's trade of Andrew Kaiser and has followed that business ever since. He owns a good farm of 200 acres near town and is doing well financially. In 1853 he married Sophia Bremer. They have four children living: Henry J., Ernst W., Daniel G. and Lydia K. Mr. Blemker is a stanch Republican and has served three terms as township trustee. He has been a member of the town council five or six years. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church.


 
ISAAC BEELER, M. D. (deceased), one of the early physicians of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born near Dayton, Ohio, October 14,1828, and was raised on a farm in his native State, receiving a good education. Early in life he began the study of medicine, and later graduated from the medical institution of Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1851 he came to Huntingburgh, and soon acquired the leading practice in the county, and was well and favorably known as a competent physician and excellent citizen. He was a member of the Christian Church and a Republican in politics and an active worker for his party. December 3, 1846, he married a Miss Hughes, who died leaving one child, a daughter ; January 4, 1863, he married Mary Robertson, a native of Spencer County, who still survives him. They were the parents of five children : Elmer E., who is a young man preparing for the medical profession, Alvin, George, Sarah E., and Nancy.


 

JOHN HERMAN HENRY BORMANN, farmer of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, April 10, 1822, a son of Henry and Margaret A. (Rathje) Bormann, who remained in their native country until our subject was thirteen years old, when they immigrated to the United States and located in Pittsburgh where the father worked for a few years. They then came to Dubois County, Ind., and located on a farm where they passed the remainder of their lives. The father died October 24, 1847, and the mother August 20, 1847. Henry remained at home until twenty-four years of age, when he worked at teaming and gardening for about two years. In 1848 he bought the farm of eighty acres where he now lives, and which he has since increased to 120 acres. November 22, 1849, he married Katharine Beamer, native of Hanover, Germany, born 1832. They have two children: William and Mary. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church and he is a Democrat in politics.


  

LEONARD BRETZ, a prominent early settler of Dubois County, was born February 28, 1829, in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, and is one of six children born to Jacob and Barbara (Bausman) Bretz. The father, a. farmer in the old country, immigrated to the United States with his family in 1837 and engaged in like pursuits five miles east of the present town of Huntingburgh, Ind. He remained there until his death in 1878 followed by his widow two years later, both having been members of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. Leonard passed his youth and early manhood at the old home farm, securing only such education as the limited facilities of that day afforded. When seventeen years old he went to Louisville, Ky., where he clerked four years in a hardware store. In 1851 he embarked in general merchandising in Huntingburgh, and has since continued here with more than ordinary success. Mr. Bretz, besides having made life a financial success, has justly won what is far better— an honored name and a record untarnished by dishonesty or otherwise. The same year of his embarking in business in Huntingburgh, 
Barbara Gerhard, a native of Bavaria, became his wife, and they are the parents of eight living children: Anna B., Wilhelmina F., Emeline, William L., Gustav C, Walter F., Matilda S. and John Henry. Mr. Bretz is a Democrat, and although by no means an office seeker he takes an active interest in public affairs and is jury commissioner for Dubois County. He and family belong to the Lutheran Reformed Church.


 
BENEDICT DUPPS. a stanch Democrat of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Baden, Germany, March 3, 1833, and is the only child born to Christian and Otillia (Barger) Dupps. Our subject was reared in his native country, where he remained until he was twenty-two years old. He receiv ed a good education in the schools of that country, and in 1855 he and his people took passage for the United States, landing first at New Orleans, from whence they came immediately to Dubois County, Ind., where they have since remained. In April. 1857, Helena Lampert became his wife, and to them eleven children have been born, of whom these ten are now living: John, Benedict T., Henry, Joseph, Theresa, Rosa, Elizabeth. Frank, Edward and Emma. Mr. Dupps is a successful farmer and now owns 216 acres of well improved land. He and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 MARTIN ECKSTEIN is a native of Ripley County, Ind., and was born November 9, 1857. He is the third in a family of nine children bom to Theodore and Louisa (Renner) Eckstein, who were natives of Germany, and came to the United States in 1864. Martin passed his boyhood on a farm, where he received a fair education in the common schools. His father died in 1870, and he was compelled to assist in the maintenance of the family. May 1, 1884, he embarked in the brewery business, at which he has been very successful. May 8, 1883, his marriage with Josephine Schilter was celebrated. They are the parents of one child. Hermann. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.


 
JOSEPH EGG, citizen of Jasper, Ind., was born in France, September 13. 1882, and is the only living child born to Henry and Ursula (Jemean) Egg. Our subject was reared in his native country, where he received a good education, and remained until thirty years of age. At the age of thirteen, in accordance with the customs of his native land, he learned the stone-cutter's trade. He was married to Mary Ruh, May 19, 1844, and they became the parents of five children: Emma, Rosa, Pauline, Charles and Mary. Mr. Egg and family immigrated to the United States in 1852, and landed at New Orleans with but $35 to meet their expenses. They came directly to this State and county, and settled at Jasper, where they have ever since lived. In 1854 his wife was called from among the living. He worked at his trade three years, and then purchased what is now known as the Daniel House, and began keeping hotel and saloon, continuing in this till 1864, when he began keeping a general merchandise store, and in connection was appointed postmaster of Jasper by President Lincoln, and held the office almost without an interval of rest until 1877. In 1854 he married Rosa Miller, and by her he became the father of three children: Elizabeth, John and Theresa. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat, and has been town councilman for five years.



 GEORGE FRIEDMAN, a member of the firm of Friedman, Scheirich & Co., is a native of Jasper, Ind., and was born April 23, 1838, the youngest in a family of nine children, born to Joseph and Mary A. Friedman, who came from Germany, and were among the first settlers of the community. George was reared on the farm and in the store until he attained his majority. His education is limited, owing to the undeveloped school systems of that day. In 1858 he married Rosa Reolle, and they became the parents of nine children: Mary, Joseph, Martin, John, Josephine, Andrew, August, Louis, and Henry. Our subject made his first start in life as a farmer, in which business he continued until 1801, when he realized the necessity of quelling the rebellion, and accordingly volunteered his services as a musician. A short time afterward bands were done away with, and in 1865 he re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers. After his return he engaged in the planing-mill business, at which he continued until 1871, when he and his brother engaged in saw-milling and lumbering. In 1884, they and Peter Scheirich became partners, and have since been very successful in their business ventures. Mr. Friedman and family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat.


 
MARTIN FRITCH, is a native of Germany, born November 11, 1833, and is the elder of two children born to Charles and Mary A. (Hurst) Fritch. Our subject remained in his native country until he was nine years of age, when he and his people embarked for the United States, and came to Cincinnati, Ohio, where they remained six weeks, and then came to this county and State, and settled a short distance from our subject's present place of abode. A few years subsequent to their coming here, the father died, and Martin took charge of the farm, where he has always remained. His English education is very limited, owing to the hard work he was obliged to do on the farm, and to the poor school advantages of his day. November 14, 1854, he was married, and became the father of nine children, eight now living: Andrew, Theresa, William, Henry, Mary, August, Joseph and Frank. They have been quite successful, and own 280 acres of well improved land. They are Catholics, and Mr. Fritch is a warm Democrat.


 
ANDREW GIESLER was born February 5, 1848, and is the eldest of four children born to Lorenz and Barbara Giesler, natives of Germany. The father came to the United States as early as 1845, and soon after located in this county and farmed until his death in 1871. The mother died in 1857. Andrew was raised on the farm and secured a fair English and German education. At the age of twenty-three he and Theresa Oestrich were joined in the holy bonds of matrimony. She died in 1881 and left four children: Mary C, Elizabeth C, John W. and Joseph J. In 1881 he married Theresa Goetz, his present wife. Mr. Giesler is a Democrat and he and wife are Catholics. He is considered an honest and successful farmer and esteemed by all as an excellent citizen and neighbor.


 
BAZIL L. GREENE, clerk of Dubois County, Ind., was born October 1, 1851, son of James and Nancy (Edmonston) Greene, natives of Indiana. The father was a farmer by occupation. His death occurred in 1853. The mother afterward married Henry Weathers, by whom she bore three children, one now living. Bazil L, was raised by his grandsire, Bazil B. Edmonston, receiving a fair literary education, and attended the State University at Bloomington, Ind., two years. At the age of seventeen he began teaching the "young idea;" continuing at this four years. When twenty-two, he accepted the position as deputy clerk, under his grandfather Edmonston, remaining with him five or six years—and some time after was deputy clerk under Gossman. In 1882 he was elected to the lower house of the State Legislature, from Dubois and Martin Counties. Since that time he has been engaged in general insurance in Jasper, until 1884, when he was elected to his present office, which he is filling very creditably, He has served as town clerk from 1874 to 1883. August 6, 1876, he married Theresa H. Pfaff. They have two children living: Jesse B. and Bessie. Mr. Greene is a Democrat in politics, and a Mason. His wife is a member of the Catholic Church.


 
ADAM SCHMITT, farmer, was born in Germany, May 27, 1823, and the oldest living child born to Jacob and Margaret (Lang) Schmitt. Adam remained in his native land until he was seventeen years old. He received a good education, and in May, 1840, he and his parents immigrated to the United States, landing at Baltimore, Md, in August of that year. They came to Dubois County, Ind., soon after, where they have made their home. Adam remained at home and aided his parents until their deaths, and April 16, 1849  his marriage with Magdalena Hochgesang was solemnized, and to their union nine children have been born, six of whom are living : Apalona, Mandana, Andrew, Magdalena, John and Joseph. Our subject has always been a farmer, and a successful one. He owns 300 acres of land, mostly improved. In politics he is a Democrat, and has never aspired to office. As a member of the Catholic Church he is ever ready to aid the benevolent causes in his community, with both influence and money.


 FRANK SEIBERT, senior member of the firm of Seibert & Klingel, of Jasper, Ind., is a native of Germany, where he was born August 15, 1843. He came with his parents to the United States when but a few months old. They first settled in Cincinnati, Ohio, and when Frank was but six months old, his father died. They lived for ten or twelve -years in Cincinnati, when his mother remarried and moved to Newport, Ky., from whence they moved to Troy, Perry Co., Ind. Our subject lived there until 1879, when he came to Tell City. In 1883 he moved to Jasper and purchased an interest in his present business, at which he has succeeded beyond his expectations. In May, 1873, he was married to Miss Louisa Knibel, by whom he is the father of three children: John W., Frank J. and Oscar E. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.



GARRETT B. BLACKWELL, M. D., of Huntingburgh, Ind., born August 23, 1855, is a son of Joshua D. and Samantha Jane (Helton) Blackwell, natives of Indiana. The family have resided in Monroe County, Ind., for over thirty years. Our subject received an ordinary literary education in his boyhood days, and at the age of seventeen years was apprenticed to a carpenter in the neighborhood, but discontinued the work after one year and began the study of medicine at home, which he continued till twenty-one years old and then began studying under a preceptor, continuing about two years. He then removed to Arkansas, and in a short time after to Illinois, where he practiced six months. In 1880 he returned to Indiana and located in' Gibson County, where he practiced two years, attending lectures at the Medical Institute at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1881. In 1882 he came to Huntingburgh, where he has since resided. In 1884 he returned to the Medical Institute at Cincinnati, from which he received a diploma June 2, 1885. January 25, 1881, he was united in marriage to Flora B. Martin, and by her has two children: Edith Beatrice and Garrett Eugene. In politics the Doctor is a Democrat, and a member of the Indiana Eclectic Medical Association, and an able and successful physician.


  

CAPT. MORMAN FISHER, Huntingburgh, s efficient postmaster, was born in Dubois County, Ind., on Christmas day, 1833. William Fisher, his father, was born in Ohio Aug. 9, 1791, and when a youth moved with his parents to Kentucky. He participated in the Indian war of 1812. In 1817 he settled on a farm five miles southeast of the present site of Huntingburgh. but five years later moved to Vermillion County, this State, where he resided a year. From that time until his death his home was in Patoka Township, this county. He was very fond of hunting, and many deer, bear and other wild game were killed by him in this county. He was twice married; first to Sarah Goodall, who died in 1825 after bearing a large family of children, four of whom yet live. In 1832 he wedded Mary Whitten, our subject's mother, who, with five children, yet survive him. Morman Fisher, the immediate subject of this sketch, secured a limited education in youth from the primitive schools of his boyhood days. He was engaged in farming until 1860, and from that time to 1863 was engaged in photography at Huntingburgh, looking after his farm and filling the office of justice of the peace. In the latter year he organized Company M, Tenth Indiana Cavalry, of which he served as captain until the close of the war.  Returning home he resumed the management of his farm, although living at Huntingburgh, and being admitted to the bar of Dubois County, has turned considerable of his attention to the legal profession. Since the war he has served twelve years as trustee of Patoka Township and two terms in the lower house of the State Legislature. In politics he is Democratic and is a member of the Masonic and G. A. R. fraternities. In 1856 he married Mary A. Wade, who bore him two children, only one—James Lewis—now living. The wife died June 27, 1859, and December 14, 1865, Capt. Fisher wedded Wilhelmina Helfrich, granddaughter of Jacob Geiger, the founder of Huntingburgh. To this marriage four sons and one daughter, all living, have been born. Capt. Fisher is one of the county's most honored and respected citizens. In 1885 he was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland.


 JOSEPH HEITZ, county commissioner of Dubois County, was born in Germany July 14, 1824, son of Lawrence and Katharine (Keen) Heitz. They came to America, landing at New Orleans in 1832. The mother died of that terrible disease, cholera, and a short time after the father died of the same disease. The eldest of the children was only eleven years old. The two youngest were placed in the orphan asylum at Cincinnati, Ohio, and the eldest, a girl, went to work for a family in that city. Our subject was cared for by a cousin, with whom he lived about seven years. At the age of fifteen he went to live with his eldest sister, who had married and was living in Kentucky. He remained there about a year, working in a printing office ; later he clerked in a drug store and then came to Dubois County, Ind., with his brother-in-law, with whom he stayed until of age. He then bought a farm in Patoka Township. At the end of four years he sold out and bought the farm where he now lives. He owns 280 acres of good land, well improved. In 1850 he married Katherine Rouscher. To them were born twelve children, seven now living: Lawrence, Kate, Daniel, George, Louis, Tracy and Mary. Both husband and wife are members of St. Mary's Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a highly respected and influential citizen.


 JOHN HERMAN HEITMANN, farmer, was born in Hanover, Germany, October 18, 1834, son of Henry Heitmann and Mary A. Kuhlhoff, natives of the same place. The parents immigrated to this country in 1846, locating in Dubois County, Ind., on the farm where our subject now lives. The father died in January, 1863. The mother still lives with her son at the advanced age of eighty-three years. John H. received his education in his native country and attended school here about three months. He has since obtained a good education in the English language by his own efforts. He has had control of his father's farm since quite a small boy, and has now 320 acres of good land, well improved and with good buildings. He gives especial attention to stock raising, and is doing well financially. In November, 1862, he married Katharine Behrens. To them have been born nine children. These are living: Anna, Mary, Elizabeth, Louis, Herman and Frank. Both husband and wife are members of the Lutheran Church, and he is a Democrat.


 JOHN F. HEMMER was born August 20, 1847, son of John F. and Fredrica Hemmer, natives of Germany, from which country they came to the United States in 1842, and located in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought them a farm. The father's death occurred in 1860 and the mother's in 1882. John F. received a fair education in his boyhood and remained at home with his mother working on the farm until he attained his majority. He learned the carpenter's trade and worked at it eleven years, having built during that time 322 barns and numerous smaller buildings. In 1879 he purchased the farm of 160 acres where he now lives. He was married, in 1874, to Mary Katterjohn, born January 28, 1848. Four children have been born to their union : Anna Matilda, Benjamin, William K. and Frederick J. Mr. Hemmer is a member of the Methodist Church and a warm Republican.


 FREDERICK HILDEBRAND, dealer in and manufacturer of boots and shoes, was born in Hanover, Germany, May 19, 1823. The parents, Charles and Wilhelmina (Strohrman) Hildebrand, were natives of the same country and came to America in 1854 and located first in Louisville, Ky., and afterward came to Huntingburgh, Ind., and worked at the shoe-maker's trade until he became disabled by sickness and old age, and died at the home of our subject in 1872. The mother died in 1870. Frederick was
raised in Hanover, where he received a good German education. At the age of fifteen he began learning his father's trade and worked at it until 1851, when he came to the United States and worked two years in Louisville, Ky., and then came to Huntingburgh, where he has lived ever since, engaged in his present business, and meeting with good success. In 1853 he married Mary Borman, a native of Hanover, who died in 1878, leaving eight children: Wilhelmina, Joanna, Louis, Emma, Henry, Gustav, Leonard and George. For his second wife he married Wilhelmina Kruse, in March, 1883. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Mr. Hildebrand is one of the old pioneers of Dubois County, and bears the reputation of being an honest and industrious citizen.


 BERNARD HOFFHAUS, son of John T. and Katharine (Sloeter) Hoffhaus, born January 28, 1826, is a native of Germany, from whence his parents immigrated in 1848. They located in Dubois County, where Bernard bought a farm and where the father and mother died. In 1858 our subject purchased a farm of 240 acres upon which he has since resided. It has good buildings and is well improved. In 1868 he built a saw-mill, in partnership with Conrad Hoeuner, which they ran with good success until 1884. He was married to Mary Meyers, June, 1848. To this union were born eleven children—seven of whom are living: John, Fred, Eliza, William, Conrad, Matilda and Herman. Mr. Hoffhaus is a Democrat, and he and wife are members of the Lutheran Church. He has been quite successful in business affairs. Starting with little or no capital, he has now a comfortable competency.


 MICHAEL JANDEBEUR, one of the oldest pioneers of the county was born in Aschaffenburg Baiern, Germany, April 18, 1826. He is the fourth son in a family of seven sons and two daughters, born to the marriage of Michael Jandebeur and Eva 
Schwabin, natives of France and Germany, respectively. The paternal grandfather was a man of large wealth, owning a fine estate near Paris. During the French Revolution, he belonged to the Royalist party, and in 1796; when Napoleon became the head of the Government, his property was confiscated and he fled as a refugee to Germany, where he died. His son, the father of our subject, was a small boy when they removed to Germany. He grew to manhood in that country; was married and during the latter part of his life was the proprietor of a hat manufactory. He died about 1875, at the age of over one hundred years. The mother preceded him about four years, at the age of eighty seven. Several members of the family have shown remarkable ability; a brother of Michael was prime minister in the kingdom of Baiern, and -was the author of numerous works on law. Michael, at the age of thirteen, began to learn the tinner's trade, at which he worked until 1847, when he entered the army, serving for a term of four years, which period included the Rebellion of 1848. After leaving the army he went to France, where he worked at his trade. For about two years he was also on the police force in Paris. In 1854 he came to the United States, and for the first five months after his arrival was employed as a cook at Delmonico's restaurant. He then worked at his trade in New York and Philadelphia for several months after which he journeyed on foot through Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, traveling over 1,200 miles. He at last located at Huntingburgh, Ind., where he conducted a shop for about twenty years. He is now living on a farm of eighty acres and raises a large amount of fruit, especially grapes, from which he makes an excellent article of wine. January 8, 1857, he was united in marriage with Mary B. Bockstahler, a native of Baden, Germany. They have eight children, only seven of whom are living. They are Martha, Julius, Conrad, Daniel, Jeannette, Lena and Caroline. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted as a musician in the band of the Twenty-seventh Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served about one year when he become disabled through disease. His career taken altogether has been a remarkable one.


 HENRY W. KATTERJOHN, of the firm Schroer & Katterjohn, dealers in general merchandise, Huntingburgh, Ind., is a son of Henry A. and Sophia (Elshof) Katterjohn. He was born July 12. 1856, in Pike County, and is the eldest of four children (for parents' sketch see history of Pike County). Our subject was raised on the farm and received a good education in the common branches. He followed farming as an occupation until 1884, when he engaged in his present business in Huntingburgh, and has met with good success. The firm are doing a fairly large and remunerative business, and have a good and select stock of goods. Mr. Katterjohn's political views are Republican, and he is a member of the German Methodist Episcopal Church, and is among the rising businessmen of Huntingburgh.


 FREDERICK WILLIAM KATTERHENRY, senior member of the firm of Katterhenry Bros, of Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of Dubois County, was born December 5, 1843, and is one of the four children born to Louis and Christina (Nueneker) 
Katterhenry. The children's names are Henry L., Frederick W., John W., and Louis, who is the junior member of the firm. The parents, who were natives of Prussia, came to this country in 1840 and located on a farm near Huntingburgh when the father died in 1867 and the mother in 1880. Our subject received his education in the district schools near his home, and at the age of twenty he left home and teamed for one year in Huntingburgh, and then engaged, on a small scale, in the general merchandise business with Herman Behmer as partner. In 1869 he sold his interest in the business and engaged in grist-milling, building the Star Grist-mills here. In 1875 he quit this business, and he and his brother built their present large brick building and engaged in general merchandise. They have a very fine stock of goods and are doing a paying business. In connection with their store they have a large pork packing establishment and also a grain warehouse near the depot. In 1865 he married Sophia Reutepohler. To them were born three children: Eli E., Edward H. and Oliver W. In politics he is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Association.


 LOUIS KATTERHENRY, brother of Frederick W., was born December 8. 1850. was raised on the farm, and received an ordinary education in both English and German. At the age of nineteen, he began teaching school in the county, continuing in this business two years, when ho bought an interest in the Star Grist-mill and then engaged in his present business with his brother. In 1873, he married Eliza Meyer, native of Dubois County. They have five children: Benjamin Franklin, Lillie C.. Arthur T.. Nellie A and David. Mr. Katterhenry is a Republican, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Association.


 JOHN W. KATTERHENRY son of Henry and Christina (Nunneker) Katterhenry was horn April S. 1848. His parents were natives of Germany. The father immigrated to this country when a young man. locating for some time in Cincinnati, and afterward came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought the farm, where he lived until his death March 12, 1867. John W. received his education from the primitive schools of his day and remained at home working on the farm until 1871, when he assumed control and bought out the interest of the others. He has now 240 acres of excellent land well cultivated. October 19, 1871, he was married to Sarah Koch, by whom he is the father of six children: Lydia. Emma Frank, Amelia. Nettie and Walter. Both husband and wife are members of the Evangelical Church. He is a Republican in politics and a well known and respected citizen of the county.


 FREDERICK B. KATTERHENRY, junior member of the firm of Katterhenry & Son, merchants of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born January 1. 1858, and is a son of Adolph and Christina (Bremer) Katterhenry, natives of Germany. Adolph came to the United States in 1844. and located first in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in 1850 came to Dubois County and established the first brick manufactory in Huntingburgh. He remained in this business until 1885 and is now retired from active work. He is a Republican and a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Frederick was raised in Huntingburgh. and received a good English and German education. During 1879-80 he taught school and afterward clerked in stores in his native town. In 1882 he engaged in business with his father, and now has active management of affairs. They have a large and select stock of goods and have a fine trade. Frederick is a member of the Methodist Church and is an excellent young man.


CHRISTIAN KESTNER was born in Germany in May, 1833, a son of B. Kestner and Anna Elizabeth Kilian, who came to this country in 1836 or 1837, and located in Louisville, Ky. Remaining there a short time they came to Huntingburgh. Ind., and rented land for several years. They then bought forty acres of land and gradually added to it until they at one time owned 120 acres, and also a grist-mill on the Patoka River. The father died in 1871, and the mother in 1859. Christian acquired a good education by his own efforts and remained at home assisting his father on the farm and in the mill, which he built. He had no instruction in milling, but he succeeded in making many improvements and built one of the best mills in this section of the country. He received 120 acres of land from his father, and at one time owned 200 acres. He afterward sold 180 acres and now owns eight) acres of well cultivated land. May 28, 1802, he married Mary Ficken. They have no children of their own. but have raised two children: Maggie H. Roth and Lawrence Smith. He and family are members of the Methodist Church, of which he has been a member over twenty years. He is a Republican in politics, and is a highly respected and Christian gentleman.


 JONAS KILIAN was born in Guntershausen, Germany, February 8, 1837. being one of four children horn to Henry and Elizabeth (Siebert ) Kilian, natives also of Germany. The father, who was a farmer, came to the United States in 1854 and soon after came to Dubois County. Ind., and located on a farm near Huntingburgh. where he remained until his death, which occurred in 1857. Our subject received a good German education in his native country, and after coming to this country, worked on the farm until 1863, when he came to Huntingburgh and worked at manual labor until 1866, and then bought a  brickyard and kiln, working them successfully until 1876, when he and C. W. Dufendach engaged in general merchandising, continuing at this until 1881, when he sold out his interest and bought a one-third interest in his present business. He was married, in 1858, to Elizabeth Appel. To them were born five children: Anna (deceased), John. Emma, Louis and Edward. Mr. Kilian is a Democrat and was a member of the town council one term. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and he is a successful business man and an upright citizen.


 CHRISTIAN KORNRUMPF, jeweler of Huntingburgh Ind. was born in Wolfhagen, Hessia. Germany. March 20, 1845, and is one of two children born to John and Anna Mary (Fuchs) Kornrumpf. The mother died in Germany in 1847, and the father still resides in the old country. Our subject was raised with his mother's people after her death, and received a good education in his native language. In 1856 he came to America, and lived on a farm in Dubois County two years. He there learned the shoe-maker's trade in Huntingburgh and worked at that business one year, after that he clerked in Leonard Bretz's store three years, and for three years afterward taught school in the town and county. He then returned to Mr. Bretz's, with whom he remained three more years. In 1870, he engaged in the manufacture and sale of organs, and although having no previous experience, he made such a success of the business that he continued working at it until 1875, when he quit manufacturing and began selling them ; later he added a large stock of other musical instruments, also adding watches, clocks, jewelry, sewing machines and spectacles. Mr. Kornrumpfs business increased so rapidly that in 1883, he erected his present large brick building.  In 1870, he married Anna B. Bretz. To them have been born four children: Anna S. (deceased), Martha W., Lydia K. and Clara A. He and family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Mr. Kornrumpf is an enterprising and successful business man, and is an upright and honest citizen.


 FRANK KLEE a native of Prussia, was born October 16, 1845. He is the ninth child in a family of five sons and six daughters, born to the marriage of Theodore Klee and Anna Linsnig, also natives of Germany. The father, who was a blacksmith, came to the United States when Frank was an infant, and located near Evansville, Ind. He owned a small farm, and continued to follow his trade until 1862, when he came to Dubois County and located in Ferdinand Township, where he remained until his death, which occurred in September, 1877. The mother is still living at Evansville. Frank was reared at home, receiving but little instruction in the schools. At the age of seventeen he learned the miller's trade which he followed until his marriage, after which he bought a farm east of Huntingburgh where he has since resided, he also owns property in the town. July 31, 1866, he was united in marriage with Mary Hoing, a native of Kentucky, and to them have been born eleven children, only eight of whom are living, namely: Edward, William, Anna, Louis, Frank, Mary, Joseph and Leonard. Both Mr. Klee and wife are members of the Catholic Church. For a short time during 1885, he was engaged in conducting a meat market in Huntingburgh.


 GERHARD KOCH, Jr., was born in Dubois County, Ind., April 12, 1842. and is a son of Gerhard Koch, Sr. He was educated in the common schools near his home and at the age of nineteen he married and settled on the home farm where he has since resided; he has a fine farm of 160 acres well improved, and gives especial attention to stock raising. November 14, 1860, he married Mary Wesseler, a native of the county. They have six children, five now living: John, Frank, Henry, Edward and Amelia. December, 1863, he enlisted in Company M, Tenth Indiana Cavalry; he was with Thomas' army and was taken prisoner by Hood's army, but succeeded in making his escape after four, days' captivity, and rejoined his command; he is now a member of the G. A. R. and a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church.


LEO F. SPAYD, dealer in tin, hardware, stoves, etc., established his business in Celestine, Ind., in 1876, and removed from there to Jasper in 1880. He carries a stock of $2,000 and does an annual business of $3,500. He was born in Spencer County, this State, March 7, 1850, and is the eldest in a family of ten children born to Michael and Mary Spayd, who were natives of France and Germany, respectively. Leo F. remained at home until he attained his majority. He then began learning the tinner's trade of Frank Semmiger, of Ferdinand, with whom he remained about two and a half years, and in 1876 embarked in business for himself as above stated; at which he has been very successful. In January, 1875, he married Catharine Giehl, by whom he is the father of five children, these four now living: Rosa, Tilly, Albert and Clara. He and family are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he has always been a Democrat, and has held the office of postmaster at Celestine.


 HENRY LANDGREBE, born in Germany, September, 9, 1842, is a son of John and Martha (Walter) Landgrebe, who were natives of Germany, where they lived and died. Henry remained in Germany until he was fourteen years old and had secured a fair education in his native language, he then came to the United States landing at New Orleans, where he remained three weeks, and in 1857, came to Dubois County, Ind., and located at Huntingburgh, where he learned the shoe maker's trade, working at this until the war of the Rebellion, when he enlisted in Company K, Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, serving three years as a private. At the close of the war he returned home and engaged in the manufacture and sale of shoes, together with general merchandise, in company with F. Hildebrand. In about three years he sold out and engaged in the manufacture and sale of boots and shoes for himself, in which business he has remained ever since. In 1880, he entered into partnership with his brother Louis, and Jonas Kilian and opened a gent's clothing store, and they are now conducting their enterprises with good success, having a large fine stock of goods. In 1865, he married Sophia Fuchs. To them were born eight children, six now living: Anna K., Elizabeth P., Christian A., Louisa, Emma, Otto K. (deceased), Nalda and Edmond C. Mr. Landgrebe is a warm Democrat and has been a member of the town council for eight years, and has held various other local offices of trust. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


 WILLIAM R McMAHAN, M. D., of Huntingburgh, is a representative of one of the oldest and most respected families of Dubois County. He was born September 8, 1843, being the eldest and only son in a family of five children, all living, born to the marriage of Joseph A. McMahan and Nancy Armstrong. The father was born in Kentucky in 1812, a son of William R. McMahan, and was of Scotch descent. In 1818 the family moved to Indiana and settled on a farm two miles west of where Jasper now is, in Dubois County. There the grandfather of our subject passed the remainder of his days, and as a Whig in politics was among the first to represent Dubois County in the State Legislature, and also served as one of the associate judges of the county for a number of years. He died about the year 1835, a member of long standing in the Baptist Church, of which he was a minister. Joseph A.. McMahan was raised on a farm in this county, and when a youth learned the tanner's trade, at which he worked until 1832, when he embarked in mercantile pursuits at Jasper. Twelve years later he removed to a farm about five miles west of Huntingburgh, where he resided and engaged in agricultural pursuits the remainder of his days. He was an unassuming, honest and industrious citizen, and a man whose character was without a blemish. A Republican in politics, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, he died respected by all who knew him. July 21, 1872. The mother of our subject was of Irish extraction. Born in Kentucky, she came to this State at an early day, and bravely assisted her husband in his life's labors. She died June 12, 1872, aged sixty-two years. Dr. W. R. McMahan received but a limited literary education in youth, but being a close observer and great reader, that omission has been supplied in later years. When eighteen years old, the war of the Rebellion began, and espousing the Union cause he enlisted a private in Company E, Fifty-eighth Volunteer Infantry from Indiana. He served two years, lacking two months, as private and non-commissioned officer, and after Stone River battle was promoted second lieutenant, then first lieutenant. He commanded a company on the memorable march to the sea with Sherman, and also had command of the foragers for his regiment. Returning North at the close of the war he read medicine with an uncle at Mankato, Minn., two years. In 1868 he graduated from Rush Medical College of Chicago and since that time has practiced his profession at Huntingburgh, Ind., where he has won success and distinction as a physician and surgeon, and esteem as a private citizen. Since first beginning the study of medicine Dr. McMahan has ever been a student, and besides being a member of the American Medical Association, was a member of the faculty of the Evansville Medical College during the years 1882-83-84, having occupied the chair of Surgical Pathology. He is the present president of the town school board, is one of the directors of the Huntingburgh Bank, is chief surgeon for the Lake Erie and St. Louis Railway, and is a member of the board of examining surgeons at Huntingburgh for pensions. March 23, 1868, Dr. McMahan wedded Louisa Helfrich, who died October 13, 1875, after bearing him four children, three of whom now live. March 8, 1877, Elizabeth Lukermeyer became his wife, and of three children born them two are now living. Dr. McMahan is a Republican, and himself and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church.


 

JOACHIM MIESSNER, proprietor of the Huntingburgh Woolen-mills, was born in Hanover, Germany, September 8, 1829, being one of four children born to Adolph and Catharine (Lohman) Miessner, natives of the same place as our subject, where they lived and died. Joachim passed his boyhood laboring on the farm. He received a good common school education and at the age of twenty years he left his native land and immigrated to America, locating in Huntingburgh, Ind., which was at that period a very small settlement. He worked at manual labor two years, and secured enough money to make a partial payment on a small farm he had purchased south of town. He cleared and improved the land and has lived there ever since. In 1865 he started a woolen-mill in Huntingburgh with Ernst Zeller as partner. Zeller sold out to Gerhard Koch, and in 1878, Miessner purchased the whole property and has carried on the business with fair success. He uses about ten tons of wool annually, manufacturing a superior quality of jeans, linsey and stocking yarn, and employs about ten hands. In 1850 he married Anna Catherine Harms, a native of Hanover, Germany. They have six children: John Henry, William, Anna, Charles, Maria and August. He is a Republican, and he and family are members of the Evangelical Church.


BERNARD MILLER, manager and one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Star Mills, was born in Prussia, March 18, 1848, being one of a large family of children born to Edward and Fredrica (Kuhn) Miller, natives of East Prussia and living the greater part of their lives in West Prussia, where they died, the father in May, 1885, and the mother in March, 1808. Bernard was raised in his native country, receiving a good German education. At the age of sixteen years, he began learning the , mercantile business and working as a clerk in the stores of Germany until 1877, when he came to the United States, locating first in Pike County, Ind., where he worked in a saw-mill two years, and then came to Dubois County and farmed two years, and later worked as section hand and foreman on the railroad until the latter part of 1884. In March, 1885, he bought a one sixth interest in his present business, and is meeting with good success, , that firm doing the leading business in their county, having a large steam buhr-mill. In 1878 Mr. Miller married Mary Herrudorf. They are the parents of four children: Olga, Dina, Agnes and Arthur. He is a Democrat, and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. His wife is a Catholic.


 
CHARLES MOENKHAUS
, proprietor of the St. George Hotel, Huntingburgh, Ind., was born in Louisville, Ky., March 18, 1800, and is one of seven children born to the marriage of William Moenkhaus and Fredrica Ramsbrok, who are natives of Germany. Charles came to Dubois County with his parents when a child, and was raised by them in Huntingburgh, receiving a fair German and English education. He was engaged in the hotel business with his father until February, 1883, when he assumed control of the business, and has conducted it successfully ever since. The St. George is the best hotel in the town or county, and commands the leading local and transient trade, and is well and comfortably furnished throughout. February 4, 1883, he married Louisa Bretz, a native of Dubois County. He and wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, and he is a Democrat, and a successful and enterprising young business man.


 

GEORGE B. MONTGOMERY, M. D., of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born August 12, 1827. He is one of ten children born to John R. and Kate (Brownlee) Montgomery, and is the only living representative of his people. His parents were natives of Kentucky, and the father came to Indiana when about ten years old, and located with his parents in Gibson County, where he spent the remainder of his life. He held the office of recorder of that county for twenty-seven years, and was well and favorably known. Our subject's grandfather was also quite a noted personage. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, being in the battle of Tippecanoe, and was associate judge of the probate court a number of years. Was a member of the State Legislature from Gibson County, serving a number of terms in that capacity. The immediate subject of our sketch received a fair education in the public schools, and at the age of seventeen began the study of medicine under Drs. Graff and Lewis, and also under Dr. Fullerton, continuing his study two or three years. He began practicing medicine in Jefferson County, Ill., continuing one year. He then came to Jasper, Ind., and shortly after removed to Winslow, Pike Co., Ind., and made that his home for over thirty years. In the meantime he graduated from the Medical College of Evansville in 1868, In 1883 he came to Huntingburgh, where he is at present engaged in the practice of his profession, meeting with good success wherever he goes. He was appointed assistant surgeon of the Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and was afterward promoted to surgeon of the regiment. January 4, 1851, he married Kate Whitman, a native of Warrick County, Ind. They have three children living: Clarence, Viola and Helen. He is a stanch Republican, and has held the office of examining surgeon for pensions for ten or twelve years, but was removed under Cleveland's administration. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and the G. A. R. He is the last of his generation,  having no living relatives.


 

CHRISTIAN MORGANTHALER, native of Germany and son of John and Margaret Morganthaler, natives of the same place, was born June 20, 1820, and was raised and received his education in his native land. At the breaking out of the war in 1848, he came to the United States, and located in New York City, where he worked for about seven years in a store. He then came to Evansville and worked at manual labor about sixteen years. In 1872, he came to Dubois County and settled on the farm where he now lives. His farm of 170 acres is well improved with good buildings. May 2, 1850, he married Barbara Decker, a native of Germany. They have five children: Fred, Matilda, Louisa, Anna and Mary. Fred and Louisa are school teachers and are doing well for themselves. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Morganthaler is a Republican, casting his first vote for Lincoln. He is an upright, honest citizen and highly respected.


 
HON. WILLIAM E. NIBLACK, of Vincennes, judge of the supreme court, was born in Dubois County, Ind., May 22, 1822. The father who was of Scotch descent was born in Kentucky, and the mother, a native of Virginia, was of English descent. The former came to Indiana in 1817, and the latter in 1820. They were married near Petersburg, Pike Co., in 1821. Our subject, spent his early life on a farm, and when sixteen years old entered the State University, but pecuniary circumstances did not permit him to finish his course and graduate. He followed surveying three years, and in the meantime studied law. In 1845 he began practicing law at Old Mount Pleasant, and in 1849 was elected to the Legislature. At various times he held the office of senator, circuit judge of the judicial district, holding the positions about eight years. He soon after moved to Vincennes and was elected to Congress in 1856, serving by re-election in the thirty-fifth and thirty-sixth Congress until 1861. He served in the State Legislature during the session of 1863, and in 1864 was again elected to Congress serving continuously until March 4, 1875. In 1864 he was delegate to the Democratic National Convention at Chicago, and the same at New York, 1868. In 1876 he was elected a judge of the Supreme Court of Indiana and served one term of six years, and was re-elected in 1882. Although he descends from the Whig and Federal party, he has always been a stanch Democrat. He is considered a just and upright judge, a true man and earnest citizen, and wears his honors in a manner that shows him to be worthy the many exalted positions he has filled.


 GERHARD H. NIEHAUS, one of the oldest pioneers of the county, was born in Hanover, Germany, April 11, 1808, son of Frederick Niehaus and Margaret Knostmann, natives of the same place. Gerhard remained in Germany until he was about twenty-four years old. Having learned the printer's trade, he came to the United States and located first in Cincinnati, Ohio, and then in Louisville, Ky., where he remained until 1838. He then came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought the farm on which he has since resided. It was then a wilderness, but now is a fine farm of 320 acres. He was married in 1837, to Katharine M. Aransmann, by whom he is the father of four children, one now living, Bernhard. His wife died July 28, 1877. He is a member of the Evangelical Church, and a worthy and useful citizen.


 

 BARNARD NIEHAUS, son of the above, was born November 28, 1838. He received a good education, and has worked on the farm all his life, having had, for the past three years, complete control of it. March 17, 1863, he was united in marriage to Eliza Weeseler, native of the county, born January 10, 1844. To them were born seven children: Katie, Benjamin. Sarah, Reuben, Levi, Flora and Lawrence. Both he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church, and in politics he is a Democrat, and is one of the best and most influential farmers in the county.


 

ERNST PICKHARDT, editor and proprietor of the Huntingburgh Signal, the only German paper in Dubois County, was born in Hueckesnagen, Rhine Province, Prussia, August 29, 1832, being second of a family of nine children born to William and Wilhelmina ( Leyer ) Pickhardt, both natives of the same country. The father, who was a cabinet-maker by trade, came to the United States in June. 1850, locating at Evansville, Ind., where he followed his trade until about 1807,when became to Huntingburgh, and continued at his trade here until his death. The father was a quiet, unassuming citizen, and was fairly successful in life, from a financial standpoint, having accumulated considerable property. Himself and wife were members of the Evangelical Church. The subject of this sketch was raised in his native country, receiving a fair education in his native language. He learned the cabinet-maker's trade of his father at the age of twelve years. He came to the United States with his parents. and worked at his trade until 1834, then clerked a year in a store in Evansville. In 1850 he came to Huntingburgh, and engaged in a general merchandise business, continuing until 1878. In 1867 he in company with a cousin Mr. Emil Reininghaus, started the Huntingburgh Signal. In 1878 he assumed complete control of the paper and has managed it ever since, meeting with extraordinary success. September 24 1854, he married Elizabeth Weisheimer, a native of Hesse Darmstadt. They have seven children living: Edmund, Ernst W., Louisa, John, Amanda, Anna and Clara. He is a Democrat in politics, but conducts his paper on the independent principle. He is a Mason. Himself and family are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. He has held various local offices of trust in the town and county, such as township trustee, and member of town and school board, and is recognized throughout the county as an enterprising and successful newspaper man, and an upright Christian citizen.


  

WILLIAM T. POWELL was born April 29, 1845. and is the elder of two children of James and Sarah (Oxley) Powell, natives of Virginia and Indiana, respectively. The father was married in this county, and has since been living on a farm. The mother died in 1878 or 1879, and about two years later the father took for a second wife, Mrs. Sarah Hendrickson. William remained at home until about twenty years old, when he married and began farming for himself in Ferdinand Township, where he lived until 1868, and then exchanged it for his present farm of eighty acres. He also owns eighty acres of land in Warrick County. February 23, 1865, he was married to Missouri Fisher, by whom he is the father of seven children, five now living: James T., John L., Ella A., Mary and Morman M. In politics, Mr. Powell is a Democrat, and is a well known man of the county.


 

H. WILLIAM PRIOR, a well known farmer of Dubois County, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, August 28, 1820. He came with his parents, John H. and Mary (Engel) Prior, to America in 1842, and located in Huntingburgh, then consisting of two or three houses. They lived on leased land about six years, when the father died, October 16, 1848, and very soon after, William entered the farm where he now resides. He now owns 120 acres, and has shown great industry in clearing it and getting it in the fine state of cultivation it now is. August 31, 1848, he was married to Mary A. Beamer, born in September, 1831. Twelve children have been born to them, ten of whom are living: Henry, Anna, William, John, Louisa, Frederick, Caroline, Louis,  Rosa and Johanna. The two children who died were August, aged eighteen years, and Mary, an infant. The family are members of the Lutheran Church, and in politics he is a Democrat.


 AUGUST RAMSBROK, one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Union Mills, was born in Prussia, January 8, 1841, is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Lohofener) Ramsbrok, natives of the same province, where they lived and died. August received a fair German education, and came to the United States in 1855, locating first in Louisville, Ky., where he commenced the cigar maker's and baker's trades, working until 1861. He then  enlisted as musician in the Fifth Regiment Kentucky Infantry, serving in this capacity, and also part of the time as baker until 1865, when he came to Huntingburgh and engaged in the leaf tobacco business until 1878, when he bought a one-third interest in his present business, in which he has met with good success. The firm has a large and well furnished steam buhr-mill and commands a good trade. In 1865, Mr. Ramsbrok married Fredrica Winkenhofer. To them were born four children: William H.K., Christian R. F., Henry B. (deceased) and Louisa M. He is a Democrat, and has been a member of the town council over fifteen years. He and his wife are members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


 
HERMAN ROTHERT, a prominent citizen of Huntingburgh, Ind. was born in Hanover, Germany, October 28. 1828, and is an only son of four children born to Gerhard and Margaretta (Kuhran) Rothert, natives of the same country. The father, who was a house carpenter by trade, came to the United States in 1840, and soon after, located in Huntingburgh, where he worked at his trade, bought lots and built a house in order to prepare a home for his family, whom he had left in the old country. In 1840, he returned home, but came back the same year, bringing his oldest daughter with him. In 1844 he sent for the remainder of his family, and continued working at his trade in Huntingburgh until his death, which occurred in 1855. His widow is still living, at the age of eighty-five, and resides in Huntingburgh. The subject of this sketch was raised in Germany, and received only a common education in his native language. At the age of sixteen, he began learning the carpenter trade of his father, working at it off and on, until he was twenty eight years old, working also at any manual labor by which he could obtain money. He soon evinced a disposition for trade, and began in the merchandise business, also trading in fur and tobacco, and engaged in the pork-packing business. Later, he began keeping hotel, conducting it successfully for a number of years, also continuing the other enterprises with the exception of store-keeping. Mr. Rothert proved very successful in the tobacco business, and enlarged his warerooms from time to time, so that now he has two large buildings, one three and a half stories high, and covering an area of 150x152 feet. He gives employment to sixty or sixty-five hands ten months during the year, and handles about 1,000,000 pounds of leaf tobacco annually. He is in every sense of the word a self-made man, having started in life with but little money, and little or no English education, but by untiring energy and perseverance, he has arisen step by step, until he now possesses a competency second to none in southern Indiana. He owns 2,500 acres of good land, mostly in Dubois, Pike and Warrick Counties. September 19, 1854, he married Franziska Weber, a native of Bruchsal City, Baden, Germany. To them were born five children: Frank J. ( deceased), Sophia, John H., Hugo C, and Otto A. Mr. Rothert has always been a reliable Democrat, and was a public official here a number of years, and also postmaster for some time. He has never aspired to any office of note. He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Reformed Church. His wife who is an intelligent, accomplished lady, is a member of the Catholic Church. Mr. Rothert who is president of the Huntingburgh Bank, is an enterprising and successful business man, owns property in Greene County. Ark., and has the reputation of being a thoroughly upright and honest citizen.


 HENRY SCHROER, merchant. Huntingburgh, Ind., and native of Dubois County, was born April 1. 1844. He is a son of William and Christina ( Christopher) Schroer, natives of Prussia, who married in the old country and came to the United States in 1836or 1837, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, where they remained about four years, and then moved to Dubois County. They chose for their home a tract of land a few miles west of Huntingburgh. Here they passed the remainder of their lives, the father's death occurring October 11, 1872. and the mother's March 7, 1869. William was quite successful from a financial standpoint. He cleared and improved his laud and was forced to undergo many of the hardships incident to pioneer life. His son Henry, received as good an education as could be obtained in the schools of his day and at the age of twenty-two he left home and worked at manual labor in Boonville, Ind. He soon returned home and feeling the necessity of a better education, began selling scientific and religious books in order to obtain money for schooling. He attended the Rockport Indiana College for some time where he fitted himself for teaching. He continued at this work until he was twenty-seven or twenty-eight years of age, when he returned home and took control of his father's farm, which he subsequently bought and where he lived until 1880, when he moved to Huntingburgh and engaged in general merchandising. His business increased so rapidly since 1884 that he took Henry Katterjohn as partner. They have had excellent success and are doing a thriving business. April 15, 1869, he married Dinah Feldwisch. To this union were born five children : Emma M., Louis William, Sarah, John and Wesley. Mr. Schroer is a stanch Republican and he and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is recognized throughout the county as an enterprising and upright citizen.


 HENRY SCHNECK, proprietor of a wagon, blacksmith and repair shop, began business September 1, 1871, in the building he now occupies. He has an extensive trade and is doing a thriving business. He was born November 16, 1843 in Wurtemburg, Germany, and is one of eight children born to Henrich P. and Christina (Green) Schenck, natives of the same place, in which country they lived and died. The father who was mayor of Ossweil, died in 1869, and the mother in 1861. Henry received a good education in the schools of his native country, and at the age of fifteen years began to learn the machinist's trade, serving six years as an apprentice. In 1864 he came to the United States and worked five years in Jeffersonville, Ind., meanwhile learning the blacksmith's trade. Until 1871 he worked in Louisville, Ky.. and then came to Huntingburgh where he has since resided. October 29, 1872, he married Katharine Limp. To this union four children were born; Charles, Lizzie, Otto and Hugo. He and wife are members of the Lutheran Church and he is a Democrat.


 HERMANN H. SCHMETT, native of Hanover, Germany, was born August 21, 1838, being the second son in a family of four children of Adam and Kate (Bellar) Schmett, who came to the United States in 1852. On reaching Troy, Ind., the father took sick and died. The family came on to Dubois County, Ind. Herman worked on farms for wages until the breaking out of the war when he enlisted in Company G, Sixtieth Indiana Volunteers, serving until March 21, 1865. He participated in the pursuit of Morgan, siege of Vicksburg and the Texas campaign, and numerous lesser engagements. Soon after returning home he bought the farm where he now lives. He has now a farm of 120 acres and has erected good buildings on it. and is giving considerable attention to stock-raising. November 30, 1865, he married Katie Bergmann, a native of the county. They have six children : Frederick, Adam, Bernhard, Frank, Louis and Edward. Both parents are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is very liberal, usually voting for the man rather than the party. He favors Democratic, principles.


 

 DR. CHARLES W. SCHWARTZ, druggist and practicing physician of Huntingburgh, Ind., was born near the city of Strasburg. Germany, December 23, 1850, and is the eldest of three children born to Phillip and Kathrina ( Miller) Schwartz, natives of the same place. The father was a carpenter by trade and came to the United States in 1852, followed by his family a year later. He located in Posey County, Ind., where he followed his trade and engaged in mercantile pursuits until his death in 1882. The mother died in 1873. Our subject received a fair education is German and English, attending Evansville Business College for some time, at the age of seventeen he began clerking in a store at Evansville where he remained six months. He then returned home and began the study of medicine and attended the University of Louisville, Ky., in 1872, 1873 and 1874, and graduated from that school in the latter year. He came to Perry County and practiced for some months in Leopold during his vacation in 1873. He settled permanently in Huntingburgh and soon established a good practice. In 1880 he began keeping a drug store, which has proved very successful to the Doctor. He carries an excellent stock of goods and has a large share of the trade in town and county. August 20, 1874, he married Emma Fromm. To them were born two children : Esther S. and Charles H. The Doctor is a Republican in politics and was pension examiner, for three years. He is a member of the County Medical Society and was president of that body one year. He is a Mason and was raised in the Lutheran Reformed Church of which his wife is a member. Dr. Schwartz is one of the energetic and prosperous business men of Dubois County, and is recognized as a well read and efficient physician and an excellent citizen.


 CHARLES SHURIG, dealer and manufacturer of tin ware, stoves, cane and cider-mills, was born in Saxony, Germany, September 25, 1833, being one of a family of seven children, born to August and Wilhelmina (Kulka) Shurig, natives of Germany, where they lived and died. The subject of our sketch remained in his native country until he was seventeen years old, when he came to the United States in 1851, and searched for his sister, who had come here about a year previously, and found her in Newark, N. J. He remained there about five years and then traveled all over the Western States as far as Kansas, working at his trade, and finally bought a farm in Kentucky, where he remained two years. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted as a home guard, and volunteered as a two months' man to guard Cumberland Gap; finally on account of his Union sentiments he was compelled by the Southern guerillas to leave Kentucky, so accordingly, in 1863, he came to Dubois County, Ind., and started a stove and tin-ware store, remaining in that business ever since, where he has had the best of success. In 1860 he married Mary Johnson, a native of Kentucky, and a daughter of one of the early and prominent families of that State. They have eight children living: Franklin, Charles, William E., Emma E., James Louis, Philip, Henrietta W. and Chester August. In politics Mr. Shurig is a stanch Republican, and a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.


 GUSTAV SPITZER (deceased), formerly one of the old and prominent farmers of the county, was born in Solingen, Germany, September 17, 1818, son of John A. Spitzer and Anna Maria Schlagter, who came to the United States in 1832, and located in Louisville, Ky., where they remained about two years, and then came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought forty acres of land. The father died in 1852, and the mother three years later. Gustav received a common school education in his native country. After coming to America he remained with his parents, except a short time before the Mexican war, when he worked at the cutler's trade. He was married to Julia Risch, October 6, 1853. To them were born eight children, four of whom are living: Matilda, Hermine, Conrad Gustav and Emily. Mr. Spitzer was quite successful, financially, and at the time of his death, January 13, 1876, he owned 280 acres of land. He was a member of the Lutheran Church and a good and useful citizen.


 FREDERICK L. STORK, engineer and one of the proprietors of the Huntingburgh Star Mills, was born December 20, 1851, and is a son of William A. and Mary (Waldmann) Stork, natives of Germany. The father, who was a farmer, immigrated with his wife and three children to America in 1847, and settled in Dubois County, Ind., where he bought a farm and remained until his death in 1880. The mother still resides with a son in Holland, Ind. Our subject received an ordinary English and German education, and at the age of twenty-two years learned the carpenter's trade, and followed it in this county with good success until 1885, when he bought a one-sixth interest in his present business and has given his entire attention to it since. In November, 1880, he married Sophia Louisa Hilsmire, to whom two children were born: Walter Clarence and Stella Hattie. Mr. Stork is a warm Republican, and he and wife are members of the German Methodist Episcopal Church.


 ADAM STRATMANN was born in Germany, December 8, 1849, and is a son of John and Theresa (Muetterich) Stratmann, who came to America in 1856, locating first in Covington, Ky., where be remained three years. He then came to Dubois County, Ind., farming in Jefferson Township until his death in August, 1883. The mother still resides on the farm. Adam lived with his parents in the city and on the farm until he was fifteen years old, and secured a common German and English education. He left home and began learning the blacksmith trade in Cincinnati, Ohio, and worked at this business until he was twenty-one years of age. He then came to Dubois County, and farmed and blacksmithed at home until after the war, when he engaged in the saw and grist-mill business in Schnellville until 1871, and then farmed until 1884. He then came to Huntingburgh and engaged in selling all kinds of building material in which he has been quite successful. In 1873, he married Caroline Schnell, daughter of Henry Schnell, of Jefferson Township. Mr. Stratmann is a Democrat, and a member of the town council and he and wife are Catholics.


 WILLIAM THIES, manufacturer and dealer in furniture at Huntingburgh, Ind., is a native of Hanover. Germany, born February 5, 1841, being an only child of John Thies and Angelina Wiethaup, natives of the same place, where the father died when William was about three years old. Our subject came to the United States with his mother in 1852, and located in Huntingburgh, where the mother died in 1877. He received a limited education, which he has improved in later years by his own efforts, and by contact with business life. At the age of twelve years, he began learning the cabinet-maker's trade, which he followed for about twelve years. In 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company K, Twenty-fifth Indiana Volunteers, serving until the close of the war, when he returned home and worked at his trade until the fall of 1865, and then started a planing-mill in company with Henry Winkenhofer, continuing at this about six years. He then sold his interest, and two years later engaged in the tobacco business with Henry Dufendach, at which he continued two years. Until 1884, he was one of the proprietors of the Union Grist-mill. He then sold out and soon after engaged in his present business, in which he is meeting with good success. Mr. Thies is a successful business man, starting with no capital, he has by good management and industry, acquired a comfortable competency. In 1865 he married Anna Wesseler, to whom eight children were born, six now living: Ellen M., Leah, Samuel, Franklin, Walter N. and Lillie. His political views are Republican, and he and wife are members of the Evangelical Church.



  ANDREW M.  ANDERSON, an enterprising young farmer of Dubois County, Ind., is a son of John and Elizabeth (Armstrong) Anderson who were natives of Kentucky, and was born February 23, 1852. The father came to this State in his youth. Here he married and afterward lived for some time, running a grist-mill, but afterward sold out and bought a farm of 400 acres in Dubois County. His death occurred March 13, 1860. The mother is yet living. Our subject was raised at home, and received a fair education in the district schools in his neighborhood. He has always made his home with his parents, and is at present living with his mother on the old place. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for R. B. Hayes. In 1881 he was nominated and elected assessor of Madison Township for a term of four years, and has given the best of satisfaction. Mr. Anderson, who is a young man of energy and enterprise, owns eighty acres of good land, and as his share of the estate has the old homestead.


 W. C. BRITTAIN is a native Hoosier, born in Dubois County. August 22, 1830, a son of Smith and Sarah (Brown) Brittain. Smith Brittain was horn in North Carolina. August 1, 1806. He came to Indiana when the country was a wilderness, and passed his life among the  Indians, wild animals, and in participating in the discomforts of pioneer life. His death occurred November 10, 1880. His wife was a native of Kentucky, born October 11, 1806. and died January 16, 1877. Our subject was raised on a farm and remained at home until he was twenty eight years old. He was married to Samantha Mathis, horn September 25. 1843. in Indiana. They are the parents of four children: Eva. Egro G, lona Idelia and Evertt Guy. Mr. Brittain received forty acres of land from his father, to which he added 160 acres more. On this farm he lived about ten years. He then sold out and purchased 246 acres in Madison Township, where he now lives. He has built him a fine residence and erected good barns, and is prepared to pass the remainder of his life in ease. He is a Democrat in politics, casting his first vote for Buchanan. In 1882 he was appointed county commissioner to till an unexpired term, and in the same year he was elected to fill the office again for three years. He is a Mason and member of the A. O. U. W. He and wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.


 JOSIAH COLVIN, merchant, of Ireland, Ind., was born May 17. 1839, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Hillman)  Colvin, respectively of Ohio and Kentucky. The father bought a farm of eighty acres in Pike County, Ind., and worked there until his death, which occurred in 1845. The mother is yet living on the old place. Our subject's education was meager, and was gained amid the disadvantages of frontier life, in log schoolhouses. His father died when he was six years of age, and he remained at home until he was seventeen, when he commenced as an apprentice learning the carpenters trade, at which he worked until 1861, when he enlisted in the Union Army, in Company I, Forty-second Indiana Infantry. He took an active part in the battle of Perryville, and was discharged in 1863, owing to disability to perform active duty. September 1, 1863, he wedded Jane Selby. to whom four children were born: John W., Lillie May. Emma C. and Ella D. For some years after marriage he worked on his mother's farm, and carried the mail from Petersburg to Washington for eighteen months, and from Oakland to Princeton one year. In 1874 he commenced the mercantile business in Oakland City, where he remained seven years; thence to Petersburg, remaining four years: thence to Ireland, in 1885, where he is now carrying on the mercantile business. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln. He is a Mason and member of the I. O. O. F.


ASHBERRY ALEXANDER (deceased) was born in North Carolina, September 8, 1812, son of Isaac and Charlotte Alexander, who came to Indiana in 1815, and settled in Dubois County, where the father entered a large tract of land south of Ireland. He was among the first settlers, and came here when the country was an unbroken forest. He endured many of the privations inevitable to pioneer life, but by industry he soon had a good home. He died December 27, 1851. The mother was born in 1779. The subject of our biography was reared at home, receiving a common school education. He made his home with his people until twenty-eight years of age, when he married Eliza Ann Dotson, a native of Indiana. She died in 1843, and he took for his second wife Nancy Armstrong, born October 9, 1811. To them were born four children: Charlotte, Isaac, George M. and Elizabeth. His second wife died August 10, 1858, and January 18, of the next year, he married Nancy Ellen Haskins, born April 27, 1838. They are the parents of eight children : Thomas Ashberry (deceased), Johanna (deceased), Morton, Brittannia 
Ellen. Mary, Permelia D., Ida May and Naomi. After his first marriage he located near the old home, and began farming. By economy and prudence he became the possessor of 900 acres of land of excellent quality, all in one tract. His death occurred December 7, 1876. In 1880 his widow married Stephen T. S. Cook. Our subject was a Republican and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.


 

S. H. DILLIN is one of eleven children born to Samuel and Jane (McMahan) Dillin. He was born in Dubois County, Ind., July 7, 1852. The father was a native of North Carolina, and came to this State with his parents when only about eight years of age. He married, and purchased 760 acres of land in Dubois County, where he located and remained until his death, April 23, 1875. He was an industrious and prosperous farmer, and one of the largest land holders in the county. He was twice married, and was the father of sixteen children. The last wife is yet living in Dubois County. Our subject remained with his parents until his majority, and then married Hester Ann Dillin, daughter of Benjamin and Eliza Dillin, and began his career as a farmer. He bought 140 acres of land, and his father gave him 200 acres more. Here he located and has since lived. To him and wife were born these children: Charles W., Samuel E., Benjamin F., Frederick T., Leila and Alice. Mr. Dillin is a Republican, casting his first vote for R. B. Hayes. In 1880 he was elected township trustee, and at the end of two years was re-elected, proving an efficient officer. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


JOHN A. GREEN, a native of Indiana, was born in Dubois County. January 1. 1843, and is one of eight children born to Lewis and Sarah (Ritchie) Green, who were natives of Kentucky. Lewis came to this State in his youth and followed farming as an occupation. In 1832 he was married and afterward bought 280 acres of land in Madison Township. Dubois County, where he lived thirty-two years. He afterward sold out and purchased 280 acres in a different part of the same township. His death occurred May 11. 1880. The mother is of Scotch- Irish descent, and a daughter of a Methodist minister. She came to Indiana from the Blue Grass State, when there were only a few white people  in the county. She is now an agile, bright old lady of seventy-seven years. John A. was raised and educated in his native county, the first twenty-one years of his life being passed in aiding his parents on the home farm. Being a strong Union man. he enlisted in Company M, Tenth Indiana Cavalry, February 7. 1864. Shortly after, when out on duty, he was captured at Hollow Tree Gap. Tenn., and taken to Andersonville, where he was  held for four months, when he was paroled and delivered up at Vicksburg and came home on furlough and did not enter the field again as hostilities had ceased. September 21, 1865, he married Elfa Banta who was born October 6, 1S47. in Washington County, Ind. They have five children: Grace. Culvin, Neanian, Lewis and Roscoe. After his marriage he settled on the old Homestead, where he now lives. He is a well to do farmer and owns 320 acres of land. He is a Republican, casting his first vote for U. S. Grant. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.


 

 GEORGE M. GREEN, a prosperous young farmer of Madison Township. Dubois Co.. Ind.. was born August 22. 1864, and is a son of William H. and Rhoda (Shoemaker) Green. William H. is a native of Kentucky, and is of Irish descent, born 1821. He came to Indiana with his parents when an infant, and made his home with his mother as long as he remained unmarried. August 15. 1850, he married Martha Damans, born June 20, 1835. To them were born four children: Mary E., Sarah E.. Amelia and Minerva, all of whom are dead except Minerva. His wife dying in 1861, he took for his second wife, the mother of our subject. To them were born three children: George, Isabelle and Florilla. He was well to do, owning as high as 580 acres of good land, all of which he accumulated by his own efforts. In politics he was a Democrat, being one of the leading men of his party. He was county commissioner of the Third District for  fifteen consecutive years, and was then elected township trustee for one term. At the expiration of his trusteeship, he was again elected county commissioner for three years, thus forcibly illustrating his popularity among the people as an upright and honest man. His death occurred January 14, 1884. Since his death, his widow remains on the farm with her children. Our subject  works on the farm at home, and is a straightforward young business man.


 EDWARD A. GLEZEN, M. D., one of the old settlers of Dubois County, Ind. was born May 20, 1824, in Wayne County, Penn., and is a son of James and Susan (Hammond) Glezen. The father, who was of French and English descent, was born in Massachusetts, in 1777. The mother was born in 1780 or 1787, and was married to James Glezen, in Massachusetts. They lived for some time in Pennsylvania, and then Mr. Glezen came to Indiana to found a home for his family. He bought forty acres of land and commenced to clear and build a house, and then sent for his wife and children. The letter miscarried, and when the family, after a toilsome journey of twenty-one days, reached the new home (in May), the father had been dead three months. Our subject was educated in the primitive schools of his boyhood, and at the age of eighteen, he began the study of medicine under the direction of Dr. Leslie, of Petersburg, and in connection took a course of lectures under Dr. Davidson. At the end of three years, he located at Highbanks, Pike Co., Ind., and began practicing. He remained there one year and then moved to Ireland, Ind., where he has since lived. He purchased 202 acres of land, and in connection with his practice carried on farming, in which he has had excellent success. March 14, 1854, he married Mary Dillin, born March 4, 1830. To them were born ten children: Susan (deceased), Jane A.. Carrie E. (deceased), Martha A., Sarah D., Blanche, Samuel A., Grace B., Joseph H. and Mary J. (deceased). Although Dr. Glezen has suffered many of the hardships of pioneer life, yet he has surmounted each and every one of them, and is now a leader in his profession, and a well to do citizen. He owns 404 acres of land, 300 of which are under cultivation. He is a warm Republican, casting his first vote for Zachary Taylor. He is a Mason and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.


 

 ELIJAH S. HOBBS, one of the old settlers of Dubois County, Ind., was born January 24, 1824, in Washington County, Ind., and is one of a family of ten children born to Elisha and Lyda (Coffin) Hobbs. They were both of English descent and natives of North Carolina; the father was born October 10, 1788, and the mother in 1789. They came to this State in 1814, and bought 100 acres of land, and soon after 100 acres more. The father died in 1840 and the mother in 1865. Our subject attended the primitive schools of his times, during the winter seasons, until he was grown, when he attended the county seminary five months. In 1844 be began teaching school, continuing at that work nine winter and one summer term, meeting with good success. September 12, 1854 he married Hannah Macy, to whom four children were born: Ada, Zeno, Lyman and Belle. The two sons are working on farms for themselves, Lyman in Kansas and Zeno near home.  Belle is a teacher by profession, and has attended the State Normal School at Terre Haute, for two years. Mr. Hobbs moved to Dubois County in 1854, and by degrees purchased 480 acres of land which make him an excellent living. He lost his wife October 22, 1864, and June 7, of the next year, he married Margaret Lemmon, born August 3, 1835. He is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and may be called one of the first citizens of Dubois County, for by his industry and good management he has cleared up his farm, which was a wilderness when he settled on it, and now has a beautiful fertile farm. In politics he is a strong Prohibitionist, and cast his first vote for Zachary Taylor.


 JOHN D. KOONS, farmer, of Madison Township, Dubois County, Ind.. was born August 11. 1850. His parents were John and Barbara (Cooper) Koons. who were natives of Germany, and came to this country in 1853. They settled in Ohio, and remained there about seven years farming, and the father working at the carpenter's trade. In 1860 he moved to Scott County and bought forty acres of land where he remained until his death  which occurred about 1866. When the parents came to this country, our subject was but three years old. At the age of fifteen he left home and worked for about four years as deck sweeper on steam-boats plying on the Ohio, Mississippi and Red Rivers, afterward becoming night watchman. In the spring of 1874, he married Milda Widdle, a native of Indiana, to whom one child (now deceased) was born—Jacob. Her death occurred the 
next year after marriage. September 6, 1877, he married Alatha Carry, born June 9, 1840, in Dubois County. Ind. They have one child—Elzie Melbarn. Mr. Koons started with but fifty-three acres of land, but now owns 135 acres. In politics he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Horace Greeley. He is a member of the I. O. O. F.. and his wife is a member of the Regular Baptist Church.


 CHARLES C McCOWN, M. D., of Ireland, Ind., was born August 23, 1856, in Harrison County, Ind., and is a son of John ST., and Ruth (Miller) McCOWN, who were also natives of Indiana. The father was born in L813, and is a farmer by occupation. In 1861 he moved to Crawford County and bought 200 acres of land where he has since lived. His wife died March 19, 1883, at the age of sixty-five years. Our subject received his education in the district schools near his home, and began teaching school in 1870, and continued at that work for three years. At the age of twenty-two he commenced the study of medicine, and in 1880 entered Louisville Medical College, and graduated from  that institution as. an M. D. in February, 1882. He located in Denning, Hamilton Co., Ind., and began practicing his profession. He remained there one year and then came to Dubois County, locating in Ireland. March 8, 1883, he married Lizzie Harris, daughter of John A., and Martha Harris. She was born August 28, 1861. They have one child, a daughter, named Ruth. Dr. McCown is a young man just starting in life, but he is building up a good practice. He is a Republican, casting is first vote for James G. Blaine; he is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.


 BURR MOSBEY. Among those who volunteered their services for the suppression of the Rebellion and fought valiantly for their country's cause, was he whose name forms the subject of this sketch. Born August 13, 1843, in Indiana, his early life was passed on his father's farm. At the age of seventeen he went to Appanoose County, Iowa, and worked on the farm for three years, and then returned home and enlisted in Company K, Sixty-fifth Indiana Infantry. He was actively engaged in the battles of Knoxville, Resaca, Atlanta and Franklin, and many minor engagements. He received his discharge June 22, 1865, and returned home and led to Hymen's altar, Selina Banta, May12, 1867;she was born December 21, 1844. and is a daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth Banta. Mr. and Mrs. Mosbey are the parents of nine children: Minnie. May, Myron (deceased), Maurice, John H., Myra Elizabeth, Charles Omer. Edwin B. and an infant. Our subject bought 160 acres of land soon after marriage, and at the death of his parents he inherited eighty acres in Madison Township. He is a highly successful farmer and has a comfortable home. He is a stanch Republican, casting his first vote for U. S. Grant. His parents, Burr and Mary (Armstrong) Mosbey, were natives of Kentucky. The father came to Indiana in his youth; he was born in 1810, and died in 1842. The mother was born in 1806, and died in 1870.


 JOHN P. NORMAN, merchant, of Ireland, Ind., was born December 26, 1839, in Dubois County, Ind., and is one of a family of seven children born to John A. and Brittania ( Dillian ) Norman, both natives of North Carolina. The father left his native  State in his youth and came to Dubois County and bought 690 acres of laud in Madison and Bainbridge Townships. His death occurred June 29, 1840. The mother is yet living and is in her eightieth year. Our subject received his early education from the primitive log schoolhouse of his day, and passed his boyhood on the farm aiding his mother. September 23, 1858, he led to Hymen's altar Harriet Stewart, born July 15, 1840. To them were born nine children: Emma O, John O., Mary (deceased), Elizabeth, Robert S., Louisa (deceased), Alice Jane, Hattie May and Flora Ethel. After marriage John P. located on the old place and commenced his career as a farmer. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company E, Fifty-eighth Indiana Volunteers, serving three years. He took an active part in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge and  numerous minor engagements; was wounded at Stone River and Chickamauga, but not seriously. He received his discharge in November, 1864, and came home and resumed farming, and speculated in stock. He owns 414 acres of land, 250 acres under cultivation. In 1872 he bought an interest in a flour-mill. In connection with the mill, he entered into partnership in a general merchandise store, and now conducts the business individually  and is doing extremely well. He is a warm Republican, casting his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, he and family are members of the Presbyterian Church.


 G. L. PARR, M. D., and druggist of Ireland, Ind., was born October 19, 1847, in Crawford County, Ind. He is one of a family of eight children born to John and Ruth (Parr) Parr, natives of Virginia and North Carolina respectively. At the age of twelve years John Parr went to Lexington, Ky., where he remained for upward of six years, then went to Indianapolis where he bought 120 acres of land and began tilling the soil. In 1829  he was married, and live years later sold his farm and moved to Crawford County, Ind., and bought 240 acres of land west of Leavenworth, where he and wife are yet living. He gave each of his children eighty acres of land, and now owns 213 acres. Our subject attended district school for only about fifteen months. The most of his education was obtained at home by applying himself to his books at leisure time; thus his education  was sufficient to admit of his being a teacher at the age of twenty-one. He remained in this business three years and then entered the Medical University at Louisville, from which he graduated as an M. D., March 3, 1874. May 7, 1872, he married Sarah Taylor, to whom was born one child, Lunsford. April 28, 1S74. his wife died, and October 9, 1877, he married Ludora Thomas, who has borne him one child, Homer. In 1874 he moved to  Ireland where he has been practicing his profession and selling drugs, of which he has a good stock. In politics he is a Republican, casting his first vote for U. S. Grant, and is a member of the I. O. O. F.


 

 ELIJAH M. PIRTLE of Madison Township, Dubois Co., Ind., son of John and Nancy (Small) Pirtle, was born in North Carolina, 1833 or 1834. His parents were of Irish descent and natives of North Carolina, where they were married. They first moved to Tennessee and then to Dubois County, where he bought forty acres of land and has since lived. The mother's death occurred October 26, 1880. Our subject was raised on the farm and received a common school education. He remained with his parents twenty-two years, and in March 6, 1859, he married Matilda Mayo, daughter of George and Amelia Mayo, born June 3, 1840, in Indiana. They have four children: Mary, wife of Frederick Koons; Lucinda, Ellen and Johnnie. After marriage Mr. Pirtle located in Madison Township, where he purchased forty acres of land and lived twenty-one years. In 1884 he sold out and bought eighty acres in the same township. In politics he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for James Buchanan. His wife is a member of the Catholic Church.


THOMAS Y. RILEY, superintendent of the county poor, was born November 20, 1810,  in Sumner County, Tenn., and is one of a large family of children born to James and Delphia (Rice) Riley. The father was a native of Ireland and came to the United States in his youth and married in Virginia. He lived at different times in Tennessee and Kentucky and died in the latter State in 1814. Thomas Y. came to Dubois County. Ind., with his mother in 1818. He remained with her until he was twenty-eight years old, when he married Elizabeth Laurence, horn May 7, 1820, in Kentucky. They have had ten children: Andrew Jackson (deceased), George Washington, Sarah Ann (deceased), James K. Polk (deceased), Nancy Jane, Delphia Ann, Rachael Elizabeth (deceased), Martha Ann, Mahala Ellen (deceased) and Permelia Catherine. After marriage our subject located in Orange County, where he purchased 120 acres of land and resided for over forty years. He then came to Dubois County and lived for ten years on a farm of 120 acres. In 1881 he applied for the position of keeping the county poor and was successful in obtaining the office. At the end of three years he was re-elected. Mr. Riley is a good, humane man and the right person for the position he now holds. His wife fills the office of matron with exceptional success. At present they have about thirty persons under their care. In politics Mr. Riley is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Andrew Jackson. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church.


 J. B. ROSE, one of the worthy farmers of Dubois County, Ind., was born July 11, 1831, in Kentucky, and is a son of Walker and Edith (Kemper) Rose, who were also natives of Kentucky. The father followed the tanner's trade as an occupation. He married in his native State and lived and died there. His death, occurred March, 1841. The mother came to Dubois County in 1858, and lived with our subject until her death August 10, 1878. J. B. Rose, our subject, was raised in Kentucky, receiving a very limited education and came to Indiana when he was twenty-nine years of age. December 22, 1802, he married Mary Ann Nicholson, daughter of Richard and Susan Nicholson. She was born January 10, 1843, in Clark County, Ind. To them were born five children: Helen, Mollie, Edith. Charley and May. After marriage he and his brother, Albert, bought 327 acres of land in 
Madison Township, where he located and has since lived. In 1880 Albert died, and when the property was divided our subject received 160 acres. Mr. Rose is a promising and industrious farmer and has helped make Dubois County what it is. In politics he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Pierce. His wife is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.


 PETER J. SMALL, son of Nicholas and Margie (Lemond) Small, was born October 17. 1835, in Dubois County, Ind. The parents were natives of North Carolina, married in that State and came to Indiana in 1834, where Mr. Small purchased forty acres of land in Patoka Township and has since resided. He was an industrious man. and in a few years had increased his land to 160 acres. The mother wan born in 1801 and died in 1862. Our subject received his education at subscription schools, there being no free schools at that time. He was married, December 10, 1859, to Sarah Ann Postlethwait, born December 20, 1831, in Ohio. They are the parents of three children : Charles Marion, Sarah Alice (wife of John Stutsman ) and Elmer E. Mr. Small settled in Patoka Township, where he purchased eighty acres of land and commenced to till the soil. He remained there five years, then moved to Pike County and settled in Augusta and bought one-half interest in a general merchandise store, but becoming dissatisfied with the business, he sold out and returned to his native county and purchased 100 acres of land. November 11, 1872, his wife died, and May 8, of the next year, he married Anna Eliza Dean, born December 20, 1852, in Kentucky. They have six children: William Preston, Ida (deceased), Linnie, Myrtle, Isom Wesley, Martha Elizabeth and Erne Belle. Mr. Small has good buildings on his farm and is a prosperous farmer. A Democrat in politics, he cast his first vote for James Buchanan. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church.


 WILLIAM G. STEWART. Among the pioneer families of Indiana was that of James and Pherebe (Richardson) Stewart. The father, a native of Virginia, came to this State when only a lad, and purchased 200 acres of land in Dubois County, and in 
addition inherited 400 acres more and began tilling the soil. He was among the first white settlers of Dubois County, and lived to see it transformed from a wilderness to fine cultivated farms. He was born in 1807, and died November 12, 1883. The mother 
was of English descent, born about 1823 in the State of Tennessee. She is yet living on the old homestead. William G. Stewart was born in Dubois County, Ind., January 23, 1840, and received his education in the district schools near his home. He remained at 
home until he was twenty-one years of age, when he married Alatha Green, November (5, 1870, born in November, 1851. They are the parents of six children: James F., Harriet Louisa, Elzora Ellen, Robert Simpson, Earl Eugene and Lizzie Ann. After marriage he located on the old homestead where he now lives. He owns eighty acres of land and is an industrious farmer. He is a Republican, casting his first vote for U. S. Grant, and a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and his wife is a Lutheran.


 AARON UTZ, son of Edward and Lucinda (Harmon) Utz, was born in Floyd County, Ind., March 13, 1842. His father was of German descent, but a native of Indiana, born January 15, 1812. Floyd County has always been his home, with the exception of nine years, which he spent in Crawford County. Our subject was raised on the farm, and at the early age of nineteen he married Elizabeth Curry, daughter of William and Elizabeth (Burrel) Curry. She was born April 21. 1848, in Illinois. To this union were born seven children: George Gilbert, Sarah, Benjamin Edward, Martha Rebecca, Darthula Elizabeth, Jacob Milow and Spirsum Aaron. After marriage he located in Crawford County, where he bought forty acres of land and lived three years. He then sold out and came to Dubois County and purchased 145 acres of land in Madison Township, where he now lives. Mr. Utz has a good farm, well cultivated, with good buildings. He is a Republican, but cast his first vote for George B. McClellan. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.


 JOHN E. DUDINE was the. elder of two sons born to John A. and Katharine Dudine, who were natives of Germany. The father was born in 1797 and the mother in 1802. They married in Germany and came to this country in 1832, and settled in Adams County, Penn., where they remained seven years. They then came to Dubois County, Ind., where the mother died the ninth of March, 1864. Our subject lived with his parents both before and after marriage. He was married to Barbara Metz February 27, 1851, and to them were born ten children: John A. (deceased ), John A., Henry P. (deceased), Henry P. T., Joseph, Katharine (deceased), Mary B., Rosa K., Joseph J. and Anna K. Mr. Dudine has a limited education in English and German. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church and in politics he is a Democrat, and a successful and influential citizen. On his farm is an overhanging rock nearly 200 yards in length, and about twenty feet thick. Near the middle was an Indian cave hewn in the form of a room, in which Mr. Dudine found many Indian utensils and implements, some of which lie still possesses as relics of former times.


 GEORGE DEKEMPER is a son of George and Maria Magdalena Dekemper, who were natives of Germany. The father was born in 1821 and the mother in 1831. They came to the United States in 1833 and landed at New York; from there they came to Cincinnati, Ohio, and finally located in Dubois County, Ind. The father departed this life on the 27th of October, respected and esteemed by all. Our subject was born October 31, 1854, in Dubois County. At the age of thirteen he began learning the blacksmith's trade in Jasper. June 23, 1877 he married Elizabeth Mathias of Dubois County. The union was blessed with four children: Joseph, John. George and Maria. Mr. Dekemper has a fair English and German education, and is doing a' good business in the blacksmith and wagon-making trade. He and family belong to the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a successful and prominent man of Knoxville.


 JOSEPH FISCHER is a son of George and Adalheit Fischer, who were natives of Germany. The father was born in 1794, and the mother in 1800. They were married in 1826. To them were born nine children, all of whom are dead except the above named. They came to the United States in 1837, and in 1845 settled in Marion Township, Dubois Co., Ind. The father died April 4, 1856, and the mother November 17. I860. The subject of our memoir was born in Germany June 16, 1827, and came to this country with his parents, with whom he lived until their deaths. July 13, 1858, he married Anna M. Shepers, a native of Germany. They became the parents of nine children six sons and three daughters: Joseph B.. John. Mary. George. Bernhard, Henry, Herman, Anna and Katy. Mr. Fischer settled on a farm that was very heavily timbered, and by his energy and industry changed the forests around him into tillable fields. He has a good education, being educated in the public schools of Cincinnati, Ohio. He and family belong to the Catholic Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served two years as constable and trustee of the township, thus showing that he is well respected and an upright man.


 ADAM FITTERER, a prominent farmer of Dubois County, Ind., born January 15, 1825, was the eldest of a family of thirteen children. The parents were natives of Germany, and came to this country in 1831, landing at New Orleans, and lived successively in Ohio. Kentucky, and lastly in Indiana. For thirteen years they lived in Dearborn County ; then sold out and came to Dubois County in 1845. Both parents died in 1875. The subject of our sketch was born in Baden. Germany. He came with his parents to this country, and remained with them until he was twenty-three years old. He then engaged in different kinds of work, and was married when he was about twenty-nine years old. February 8, 1853, he led to Hymen's altar Mary Louisa Bloch, a native of France. They lived one year at Louisville, Ky., and then moved to Dubois County, Ind., and settled on a farm. At the end of four years he moved to Minnesota, and there bought a farm. He left there in a short time, and returned to Louisville. and from there came to Dubois County and settled on a farm of 120 acres, and sold out again with the intention of going West, but bought a farm in Marion Township instead, where he has since lived. He has eight children, named Philomena (deceased), John B. (deceased), Frank X. (deceased), Theressa (deceased), Isabella, Mary L., Barbara M. and Thomas J. Mr. Fitterer and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat.


 BERNHARD GEHLHAUSEN is the fourth of a family of twelve children born to Frank and Mary A. Gehlhausen, who were natives of Germany. They immigrated to this country and were married at Pittsburgh, Penn. They came to Dubois County, Ind., and bought a farm, but soon sold it and moved to Ferdinand, and engaged in farming. July 12, 1876, the mother died. The father still resides on his farm at Ferdinand, and has been engaged in teaching school for over thirteen years. Our subject was born in Ferdinand July 19, 1848, and lived with his parents the greater part of the time. May 3, 1870. he was married to Mary Anna Heeke, of Marion Township. To them were born eight children: Bernhard H., Mary K., Anna M.. Theresia M.. Frances M.. Rosa P., Joseph A. and Andrew G. Mr. Gehlhausen is able to read and write in both English and German, and is quite well educated. He and wife belong to the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served as special constable. He is now assessor of his township, and has held that office for four years.


 JOHN B. HOCHGESANG is the eldest son of Michael and Magdalena Hochgesang, who were natives of Germany, and came to the United States and were married in Dubois County. Ind., in 1843. They are still living near Jasper. The subject of our sketch was born in Dubois County, January 14. 1844, and lived with his parents until twenty-three years of age, June 8, 1867 he married Barbara K. Oestreich, of Wheeling. W. Va. To them were born eight children—six sons and two daughters: Mary J. (convent sister), Michael A., Joseph P., John A., Frank S., Anthony, William J. and Kathrina. Both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat in politics. He has a limited knowledge of both English and German. which he has acquired by his own efforts. Through energy and industry Mr. Hochgesang has turned the woods into tillable fields, and has a nice farm and home. He is an influential citizen, and is respected by all.


 JOHN LOTTES, born June 2, 1851, is a son of John G. and Elizabeth Lottes, who were born in Germany, the father in 1825 and the mother in 1829. They were married in this country and were the parents of ten children, eight of whom are living. They still
reside in Dubois County, Ind. Our subject, when about twenty-one years of age, learned the cooper's trade. March 18, 1875. he married Margaret Angerer of Harbison Township. The union was blessed with six children—four sons and two daughters: Simon, John S., Anna L., Maggie, Andrew and John C, all of whom are dead except Andrew and John C. Mr. Lottes received a fair education in English and German. He is a well read man and is a stanch Democrat in politics. At one time he kept a saloon in Knoxville, but at the present time he is working at the cooper trade and farming, and is a very successful business man. He owns a good farm near Knoxville and has a pleasant residence in the town: he and family are members of the Lutheran Church.


 JOHN LEISTNER is the youngest of a family of six children born to Conrad and Catharine Leistner, who were natives of Germany. They were married in Germany and came to this country in 1841, and settled in Dubois County, Ind., where the father died in 1843 and the mother in 1845. The subject of our sketch was born in Germany, May 15, 1831, and came to this country with his parents, and remained with them until he was fifteen years of age, when he began learning the shoe-maker's trade. Worked at that business one and a half years, then went to New Albany and continued to ply his trade, but finally started a grocery. May 15, 1855, he married Eva M. Hemsel of Dubois County. To them were born nine children: Louis, (deceased.) John M., George W., Henry Edward, John P. W., Henry T., Mary M., Emma K. and Elizabeth B. He and family belong to the Lutheran Church and he is a Democrat and an honest and useful citizen.


 PHILLIP MILLER, a prominent citizen and farmer of Marion Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born in Germany, August 5, 1845. He came with his parents, Joseph and Anna (Scherr) Miller, to America in 1855. The mother died while on the journey, but the father came on and settled in Dubois County, where he married again. His second wife was Mrs. Margaret (Smith) Carver. In 1861 he enlisted in Company I, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers. He was killed at Trenton, Ky., in December, 1862. Our subject remained with his step-mother, aiding her as much as possible, until his marriage with Miss Mary Brang, daughter of Andrew and Josephine (Hardwick) Brang. To this union eight children were born: Tracy (deceased), Margaret (deceased), Joseph, John, Jacob, Ignaz (deceased), Catharine and Lizzie. Mr. Miller is a well to do farmer, and owns 120 acres of fertile, well improved land, which he has accumulated by his own exertions. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.


 PAUL MEHRINGER, an old pioneer settler of Marion Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born June 24, 1818. He came to this country in 1838, landed at New Orleans and finally located in Dubois County. That same year he married Barbara Gebner, a native of Germany, who died a few months after marriage. Nearly two years later he married Caroline Steger, of Dubois County. To them were born these children: Kathrina, George, Barbara, John, Kathrina (all deceased), Adalheit (wife of John Marks), John N., Joseph L., Lawrence, Nicolaus, Mary (wife of George Marks), and Margaretha. Mr. Mehringer's second wife died February 22, 1883. He has a fair English and German education, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a very successful and enterprising farmer and well respected.


 JULIUS NORDHOFF is a son of Joseph and Clara Nordhoff, who were natives of Oldenburg and Hanover, Germany. Our subject was born November 18, 1840, in Oldenburg. At the age of seventeen he came to the United States, landing at Baltimore. 
He went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and engaged in the dairy business and at various occupations until the breaking out of the civil war, when he enlisted in the Ninth Ohio Volunteers and served three years. He fought bravely in the battles of Chickamauga. Mill Springs, Corinth, Missionary Ridge and others, and was with Sherman on his march to the sea; witnessed many of the horrible sights incident to army life. For one year he served at various occupations in the war and returned to Cincinnati after peace had Keen proclaimed. April 15. 1865, he married Elizabeth Haggemann, of Dubois County, Ind. To them were born these children: Theresa, Joseph, Siegfried, Clara. Philomena, Barbara, and Lizzie (deceased). Mr. Nordhoff has a fair German' education and can read and write English. He and family belong to the Catholic Church, and he is a Republican. He is a successful farmer, and an honest and enterprising man.


 JOHN G. PREUSZ was horn in Germany, August 10. 1825. His parents were John and Margaretha Preusz, natives of the same place. They came to the United States and settled in Dubois County, Ind., in 1830. To them were born four children, only two now living. The subject of our sketch remained on the farm aiding his parents. His education in English is limited, but he can read and write the German language. February 12, 1861, he married Catharine Bimin. The union resulted in two sons: Daniel and John. His wife dying July 7, 1806, he took for his second wife Caroline Linning. August 15, 1867. Two daughters were born to them : Margaretha and Kathrina, His second wife departed this life May 22, 1873. He and family are members of the Lutheran Church, In politics he is a Democrat, he is a useful citizen and a prominent man.


 ROCHUS REUSZ, was born August 13, 1838, in Germany, a son of Adam and Eva Reusz. who were natives of the same province. They were married in the old country and immigrated to this country in 1850, settling first in Kentucky, and finally in Dubois County, Ind. The father died January 22, 1875, and the mother in 1845. Our subject came to this country with his parents, and with the breaking out of the Rebellion, he enlisted in the Forty-ninth Indiana Regiment, October 2, 1861, and was a faithful soldier for over three years. He took an active part in the battles of Vicksburg, Arkansas Post and Yazoo River. At Black River bridge Mr. Reusz helped capture a whole brigade, and at Cumberland Gap he lived for some time on one-fourth rations, and nearly starved to death. He received an honorable discharge in November, 1864, and came back to Dubois County, and married Emma Prosmer, November 7, 1865, and together they raised eight children: John A., Rosa, Lizzie, Emma, "Willie (deceased), Mary (deceased), Barbara and Anna. Mr. Reusz and family, are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and a successful and enterprising farmer.


 JOHN G. STEIN, born April 22, 1829, in Hanover, Germany, is a son of John G. and Margaret A. Stein, natives of Germany. They were married in 1819, and came to the United States in 1845, landing at New Orleans. From there they came to Cincinnati,
Ohio, and finally settled in Dubois County, Ind. The father's death occurred November 18, 1855, and the mother's, October 11, 1856. Our subject was married to Mary A. Fischer in 1855. They were blessed with seven children—four sons and three daughters: John J., Mary A., Mary (deceased), John, Elizabeth, Bernhard (deceased), and Mary. Mr. Stein has a very good English and German education, receiving some of his education in Europe, and the rest in the public schools of Louisville, Ky. He and family belong to the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat, and at present a notary public. Has served as justice of the peace for eighteen years, and has held the office of township clerk for four years. A coal mine has been discovered on his farm which has been worked to some extent, and contains the best quality of coal. He is an intelligent and successful farmer of Marion Township and is highly respected.


 FELIX SCHNEIDER, a prominent citizen of Dubois County, Ind., and native of the same, was born February 14, 1848, and is the third son in a family of nine children born to John E. and Gertrude ( Wigant ) Schneider, who were natives of Germany. They were married in Philadelphia, Penn., and about the year 1835, came "West, and located in Dubois County, Ind., where the father died in 18t69. The mother is still living. Our subject received a common school education, and at about sixteen years of age went to Louisville, Ky., and engaged as an apprentice in the wagon-maker's trade, serving two years. He then came back to his native county and began plying his trade, which he has carried on successfully ever since. A Democrat in politics he was elected township trustee in 1874, and reelected in 1876, and again in 1.878, serving in all five and a half years. He is the owner of 180 acres of land well improved. He was married to Mary Schneider, September 13, 1869. To this union were born eight children: Ferdinand, Anthony, John (deceased), Barbara (deceased), Anna, Lucy, Joseph and Catharine (deceased). He and wife are members of the Catholic Church.


 ANDREW SPRALER is the fourth of a family of six children, and was born in Baden, Germany. October 1, 1810. He came to the United States in 1831, landing in New York, and worked about two years in Bedford County, Penn. ; from thence he went to Fairfield County. Ohio, and engaged in the making of brick. He lived there about six years, and then removed to Marion Township, Dubois Co., Ind., where he resides at the present time. April 20. l835 he was married to Barbara (Binder) Sprauer of Baden, Germany. To them were born a large family of children, among them being Alois (deceased). Joseph. Peter, John, Alois, Magdalena, Elizabeth (deceased), Mary, Philomena and Anna. Mr. Sprauer received a limited German and English education. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat. He is one of the, oldest settlers of Marion Township, and an honest, upright man.


 JOHN H. WIBBELS, a prominent citizen of Marion Township, Dubois Co., Ind., was born February IS, 1857. His parents were natives of Hanover, Germany, came to this country and were married at Cincinnati, Ohio. Our subject was raised in Marion
Township and has always engaged in farming up to three years ago, when he began lumbering and saw-milling. He has been very successful in each business, owing to his enterprising spirit and good management. He was married to Rosa A. Vamppa. 
November 17, 1874, in Louisville, Ky. To them were born five children—two sons and three daughters: Henry J., Benjamin J.. Philmina, Caroline M., and Mary K. Mr. Wibbels has a fair English and German education, and he and wife are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a stanch Democrat, and was elected constable, but resigned. He afterward was elected trustee by a strong majority and has served to the satisfaction of his patrons. He is recognized as one of the prominent and influential men of his township, and an upright and honest man.


 JOHN J. ALLES, a prominent man of Dubois County, was born in Prussia, April 23, 1824, a son of Jacob and Catharine ( Halin ) Alles, who were the parents of ten children. The family immigrated to America in 1840, and settled in Dubois County, Ind. The father was a school teacher in the old country, and was in the Russian war with Napoleon, acting as quartermaster in that army; was captured by the Russians and taken to Siberia. He joined the Russian Army in order to escape prison life, and after serving two years was sold to England. He was in the battle of Waterloo, serving under Wellington. Coming to America he still continued teaching, being the master of several languages. His death occurred in April, 1863, and the mother's in 1868.  Our subject received a good education in the schools of Europe. After coming to America he worked on the farm, and by industry now owns 400 acres of good farming land. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in Company I, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, as captain, and participated in the battle at Cumberland Gap and the siege and surrender of Vicksburg. In all he took part in fourteen battles, and was wounded at Vicksburg by the explosion of a shell, for which he receives a pension. In 1836 he was elected justice of the peace, and served continuously for twenty-five years, except when he was in the army. In 1880 he was elected trustee of Hall Township for four years, and in 1884 was elected county commissioner, and will take his office in December, 1885. He was married to Jacobina Hoffman, to whom were born seven children, three now living: Frederick, Catharine and Barbara. The family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat.


 CASPER BLUME was born September 19, 1831, in Germany. John and Mary (Franke) Blume were the parents of five children, our subject being the fourth. The father was a tailor by trade; he died in Germany in 1840. Casper came to the United States in 1851, and the mother about six months later. She died in Louisville in 1868. Our subject was raised a gardener and florist in the old country, but on coming to America he began learning cabinet-making, and worked at that business about two years, and then went into the regular army in 1854, and served exactly five years, taking part in "Indian Expeditions” in Nebraska, Kansas, Wyoming and Dakota He next went to Louisville, Ky., and began a clothing store, at which he continued until 1861. He espoused the Union cause; consequently, in that year he enlisted in the Fourth Kentucky Cavalry; was elected first lieutenant of Company G, and soon after was made captain. He was on many scouting expeditions, and in the battle of Murfreesboro, and was the first man on the field of Chattanooga. He came home from the army, and located in Dubois County, Ind., where he purchased eighty acres of land, and has since lived. He is now the possessor of 310 acres of good farming land. July 3, 1860, he married Gertrude Meyer, who has borne him eight children, all living at home. The family are members of the Catholic Church, and Mr. Blume is a Democrat.


 AUGUST BETZ, an unpretentious, but honored citizen of Celestine, Ind., was born March 2, 1841, a son of John L. and Elizabeth (Auth) Betz, who were natives of Germany, and came to the United States in 1835, locating at Wheeling, W. Va., 
where they remained about seven years, and then came to this State and settled in Dubois County, where the father died in 1840. The mother is still living with our subject on the old homestead. August received such imperfect educational advantages as were accorded in the country schools of that day, but has since acquired a good business education. He has always been the mainstay and prop of his mother, and on that account was forced to abandon the idea of aiding his country in the late war. He has been quite successful in his farming enterprises, and now owns 100 acres of excellent farming land. He was married, April 21, 1863, to Mary Schlegel, the result of this union being ten children, all living. The eldest (Fred) is married and living near Celestine ; the rest are at home. In politics Mr. Betz is a Democrat. He and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 JESSE COPE was born in Knox County, Ky., September 11 1855, and is one of seven children born to Andrew J. and Winnie (Lewis) Cope, natives respectively of Kentucky and North Carolina. They were married in Kentucky and came to Indiana in 1862. The father was in the late war about eight months, but became disabled and returned home. He was persecuted by the rebels in Kentucky, consequently he moved to Indiana at the above date. The mother died in Kentucky in 1862, and the father married again and came here. He died December 15, 1873. Our subject was early thrown on his own resources for a livelihood. When about twenty-three years old he married and began farming, and has dealt quite extensively in the log and lumber business for a firm in Jasper. He owns 333 acres of land, 100 acres under cultivation and the rest timber land. May 29, 1879, he married Jeannette Beaty. To them were born three children: John Elmer, Ada Anne and Everett E. Mr. Cope is a member of the .Masonic lodge and a firm and active Republican He and wife are members of the Christian Church.


 LAFAYETTE ELLIS, brother of James Ellis, was born near Ellsworth. Ind. November 3, 1849. He was educated in the district schools and passed his early Life on his father's farm. At the age of nineteen he began life for himself, working on a farm his father gave him. He has continued at that work ever since, and by industry and economy has been quite successful, and now owns 120 acres of good farming land and some property in Orange County. Ind. He was married, January 24, 1869, to Sarah J. Hubbs, the result of this union being rive children Willis W., Cecil C. Albert A.. Lillie L. and an infant. Mr. Ellis is a member of the Masonic lodge of Newton Stewart. Ind.. and a Republican in politics. He and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. In connection with farming he is running a general merchandise store in Ellsworth, the firm being known as Ellis & Henry.


 SAMUEL R. HENRY, merchant, of Ellsworth, Ind., born January 13. 1850, is a native of east Tennessee. His parents, Cicero and Martha (Rutherford) Henry, were born and raised in Tennessee and came to Indiana in 1870, settling in Orange County. In 1878 they moved to Dubois County, where the father became a tiller of the soil. His death occurred in 1879. The mother returned to Newport, Tenn., and has since kept hotel. Samuel R. received but little schooling, but owing to natural abilities he has acquired a good business education. He worked on a farm for some time after reaching his majority and then engaged in general  merchandising in Ellsworth. In 1881 he bought eighty acres of land and began farming, which work he continued till February,  1885, when he again began the mercantile business, with Lafayette Ellis as partner. He was married, October 5, 1879, to Elizabeth M. Kendall, to whom were born two children: Ellis M. and Maggie E. In politics Mr. Henry is a Republican and always has been. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


 JAMES M. ELLIS, born June 30. 1842, in Dubois County. Ind., is a son of Marvin and Permelia (Roberts) Ellis. His educational advantages were quite limited. When nineteen years old he began working on a farm in Knox County for one season, and then enlisted in Company A, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, September 25, 1861; was mustered out February 4, 1864, and re-enlisted and served till the close of the war. He was before Vicksburg in all the battles and was severely wounded at Champion Hill, and still suffers from the wound. Coming home from the war he began working on the farm. He now owns l60 acres of land mostly under cultivation. In connection with farming he runs a general merchandise store at Ellsworth. He has been very successful in both undertakings. He has been in the mercantile business since 1878. He was married, July 28, 1864, to Mary A. Beaty. To them were born six children—five now living: Marvin, Elliot E., Ida E., Thomas G. and Joseph. Mr. Ellis is a Republican and has been postmaster at Ellsworth since 1878. He and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.


 LEVI K. ELLIS was born October 17, 1846, in Dubois County, Ind. His parents were Marvin and Permelia (Roberts) Ellis, who were natives respectively of Indiana and Kentucky. The father, who was a well respected farmer, died in 1873, and the mother in June 22, of the same year. Our subject passed his boyhood hard at work on the farm. At the age of twenty he started in life for himself, farming on part of his father's land. He remained here until his father's death, when he fell heir to part of the farm. He has made farming his occupation and now owns eighty-five acres of good land—fifty acres under cultivation and the rest in timber land. When the war broke out he enlisted in Company E, Forty-third Indiana Volunteers. June, 1865, he was 'discharged. He is a Republican, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and has been three times married; first in 1866, to Ruth Russell—result, one child, Charles W. She died in 1868. To his second marriage, with Mary Brown, which was solemnized in 1868, three children were born, two now living: Permelia A. and Samuel M. This wife died in 1873, when he took for his third wife Nancy Riley, to whom were born four children, two now living: James T. and William C. His present wife was born in Orange County, Ind.


 ISAAC HARMON, a native of Dubois County, Ind., is a son of Jacob and Mary (Clarke) Harmon, and was born January 19, 1826. The parents were natives respectively of Virginia and Kentucky, and lived alternately in Harrison and Dubois Counties, moving four times. The father died in Dubois County December 27, 1870, the mother died in 1858. Isaac received a limited education in the log schoolhouses of early times, most of his education being acquired since grown. He worked for some years on a farm and then engaged in running a carding-mill, at which he continued one year. The father then bought a farm, and the son followed farming and running a peddling wagon. He also ran a blacksmith shop for some time in Newton Stewart, Ind. February 6, 1865, he enlisted in the One Hundred and Forty-third Indiana Volunteers, and was out till June, when he was discharged, owing to disability caused by measles. He has been farming the greater part of the time since coming from the war. He was married, in 1851, to Nancy A. Roberts. To them were born six children, three living. The wife died in 1871, and in November, of the same year, he married Violet (Johnson) Kelley, the result of this union being five children, four now living. Mr. Harmon is a Democrat in politics, and was elected justice of the peace in 1882.


 GEORGE HASENOUR, native of the Blue Grass State, was born August 15, 1841. His parents, Martin and Tharsila Hasenour, were natives of Germany and came to this country in 1838, and after living in several places, finally settled in Dubois County, Ind., where the father bought a farm of 200 acres and began tilling the soil. Here our subject was raised to manhood, receiving but an ordinary education, and when twenty years old enlisted in Company I, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers. He was discharged in the winter of 1863—64, having been wounded at Champion Hill. He was at Cumberland Gap and the first attack on Vicksburg. In the second fight at Vicksburg he was quite severely wounded and had to be discharged. He now receives a pension. Coming from the war, he attended school for some time and then began to "teach the young idea." He continued at this work about three years, then began the general merchandise business at Celestine, handling a complete line of goods. Besides this property, he owns 320 acres of good farming land. He was married October 15, 1867, to Rosina Schnous, to whom were born seven children. Mr. Hasenour is a Democrat, and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 JOHN W. KELLAMS, a prominent farmer of Dubois County, Ind., was born October 24, 1839. His parents, Pleasant and Mary (Conley) Kellams, natives of Kentucky, were the parents of thirteen children. The father was a farmer all his life and was among the early settlers of Hall Township. The mother died November 1, and the father November 5, 1882. Our subject received a limited education owing to the undeveloped school system of that period. At the age of twenty years he went to Knox County, Ind., and worked on a farm for one year. He then went on a flat-boat trip to New Orleans, and worked about in this manner for a year or so and when the war broke out, enlisted in Company A, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, and was discharged in 1864. He participated in the. battles of Cumberland Gap, Memphis, in all the fights before Vicksburg,  Thompson's Hill and Champion Hill, and others of lesser note. Coming home from the war lie bought forty acres of land and began tilling the soil. He has been very successful, now owning 443 acres of land, 130 under good cultivation. December 16, 1866 he married Mary Roberts, who has borne him five children: Wilbur, Charles, George, Lizzie and Rosa. He is a Democrat, and he and wife belong to the Methodist Church.


 WESLEY KELLAMS, farmer, was born March 12, 1849, in Dubois County: Ind. He attended the district schools in youth, was raised on a farm and on attaining majority began working for himself on the farm where he now lives. He purchased 140 acres of very rich bottom land and has forty acres under cultivation and the rest timber land. He is also engaged in the sawlog business, running logs down the Patoka River. His marriage occurred November 1, 1873, to Diana Harman, the result of their union being seven children, six now living: Isaac A.. Pleasant S.,  Mary E., Lillie A., Omer H. and Grover C. He has been a Democrat all his life and is a brother of John W. Kellams (see his sketch for father's history). Mr. Kellams is an excellent citizen and good business man.


 JACOB H. SENG of Celestine, Ind.. is the oldest of twelve children born to Louis and Elizabeth (Hoffmann) Seng. The father and mother were both natives of Germany and came to the United States, settling in Indiana, where the father worked on the first railroad in this State. They still live in Dubois County where the father owns about 260 acres of land. Here our subject spent his boyhood and at the age of eighteen years, began working for himself, learning the blacksmith's trade. He worked at this business for about twelve years and then engaged in general merchandising in Celestine, at which he has continued ever since. He also has a farm of 120 acres which he runs in connection with his store. May 5, 1874, he married Elizabeth Buchart. To them were born five children, three now living: Katie M., John L. and Frank J. In politics Mr. Seng is a Democrat and an earnest worker for his party. In 1884 he was elected trustee of Hall Township and is now serving in that capacity. He and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 ANTHONY MILLER, son of Charles and Caroline Miller, was born February 24, 1819, in Germany. The father was wealthy, owning a fine farm and was a farmer and weaver. When our subject was two years old his mother died ; he remained with his father in Germany, where he was well educated, until he was nineteen years old when he came to America in 1839, landing at Baltimore. He was eighty-two days on the journey owing to severe storms. He worked as a weaver until February, 1840, when he came to Dubois County and worked in brickyards. In 1853 he began his career as a farmer and has succeeded well, now owning eighty acres of good land. He was married in January, 1844, to Clara Ward, who was born and raised in Germany. They were the parents of nine children—only five of whom are now living: Anthony F., Charles, Leopold, Mathias and Frank. The wife came to the United States when only fourteen years old, in 1839. Mr. Miller is a Democrat and he and family are members of the Catholic Church.


 THOMAS J. NOLAN, teacher and farmer, was born September 27. 1844, in Warrick County, Ind., son of Timothy and Elizabeth (Stukey) Nolan, the father a native of Ireland and the mother of Ohio. Timothy Nolan came to America in 1839, and after about four years of unsettled life settled in Warrick County, where he afterward married. He died February 18, 1881, and the mother in 1873. Thomas J. received a very limited education, knowing nothing of arithmetic until after twenty-one years of age, but by his own unwearied efforts he has now a good education and has been a teacher ever since 1869, meeting with excellent success. At the age of seventeen he enlisted in Company A, Forty-ninth Indiana Volunteers and at .the end of the year was transferred to the artillery service and served three years. He participated in the battles of Cumberland Gap; Port Gibson. Champion Hill, siege and surrender of Vicksburg and numerous other engagements. At the close of the war he began teaching and working on a farm which he had purchased in White River bottom. He now owns 108 acres of rich bottom land and is doing well. He was married, September 24, 1871, to Elizabeth Ellis, who has borne him eight children, seven now living: Elmer E. (deceased) and Elda J., who were twins; Verner, Florin. Oscar, James and Charles (twins), and an infant. In politics Mr. Nolan is a Republican, and has been notary public since 1883. He and wife are members of the Methodist Church.


 EGID SCHNAUS, farmer, was born August 29, 1843 in Germany. He came with his parents. John and Mary Schnaus, to the United States in 1836. They landed at New Orleans, and afterward located in Dubois County, Ind., where they have since lived. The father has been a farmer all his life, and his son Egid, follows the same vocation. His advantages for an education were limited, but his natural abilities overbalance this. He remained with his parents until twenty-two years old, when he launched out in business for himself, hauling goods from Celestine to New Albany and Troy, in which occupation he continued for nearly three years. He then began farming on 160 acres of land, forty acres being given him by his father, and is very successful. He also owns a one-half interest in the Celestine Sawmill. November 9, 1869, he married Mary Buchart, daughter of Edward Buchart, the result of this union being six children: Caroline, Lizzie, Joseph, Anna, Rosina and Allius. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church, and he is a Democrat


 JACOB SANG. Sr., was born December 26, 1828, in Wheeling, W. Va., son of Francis and Mary (Hildebrand) Sang, who came from Germany to America in 1827. They were eleven weeks on the journey, the vessel having been shattered by a storm while in sight of land and driven out to sea, taking them about five weeks to get back. They were out of water and provisions for nearly a week, and were almost starved when they reached land. They lived for some time in Wheeling, then in Cincinnati, then in Madison, Ind.. and finally moved to Celestine, where they began farming and have since lived. The father died in 1863; the mother still lives with our subject on the old home farm. Jacob followed carpentering for some time, but now tills his farm of 120 acres. He was married, April 16, 1856. to Barbara Nodler. They became the parents of eleven children, nine now living. He is a Republican and worked hard for his party in the State election.  He has been subjected to some annoyance on account of his political belief, but he stands firmly by his party. He was in Government service in time of war. but was enlisted as a regular soldier.


 JOHN SCHAAF was born May 15, 1834, in Nassau, Germany, son of Frederick and Barbara (Opper) Schaaf, who were the parents of four children, and came to America in 1854, settling in Harrison Township. Dubois Co.. Ind. The father died in 1883 and the mother in 1867. John remained in Germany with his father till the age of sixteen years. He received a good education in his fatherland, and attended night schools in America for about two months. He worked at cabinet-making before and after coming to America, and at the age of twenty-five he started a shop of his own at Lanesville, Harrison Co., Ind., remaining there four or five years. In 1870 he moved to Celestine and engaged in the same business. Two years later he began dealing in furniture. He is now a carpenter, cabinet-maker and furniture dealer, the only one in Celestine. He was married in 1858 to Theresa Lygast, to whom were born six children: John A.. Andrew H., Mary T., Mary A.. George E. and Conrad A. The four youngest are at home. The second one is attending St. Meinrad's Seminary with the intention of becoming a priest. Mr. Schaaf is a Democrat in politics, and he and his family are members of the Catholic Church


 JACOB FRICK, a prominent farmer of Jackson Township, was born in Bavaria, Germany, July 24, 1829, being the youngest of six children born to John and Mary (Bollenboch) Frick. The father, who was a farmer, came to America in 1847, and located in Dubois County, where he lived until his death in 1856. The mother died in 1830, and Jacob was reared without her care, and remained with his father until he was fourteen, years of age, when he learned the blacksmith's trade, and followed it in his native country until 1846. In that year he came to the United States and worked at his trade in Jasper, Ind., Louisville, Ky. and St. Louis, Mo. In 1852 he went to California as a gold seeker, and worked in the mines with fair success until July, 1865, when he returned to Dubois County, and bought the farm upon which he still resides. He now has 200 acres of good land, well improved. February 22, 1856, he married Mary A. Onspaugh, a native of Ohio, who died March 28, 1872, leaving five children: John, Sarah, Mary A.. Philip and Jacob. July 9, 1874, he was united in marriage with Lizzie C. (Risch) Hagan, by whom he is the father of six children, five of whom—Hammond, Otto. William, Valentine and Charles W.—are living. Both Mr. Frick and wife are members of the Lutheran Church, and are highly esteemed by the community in which they live.


 HENRY C. HOSENOUR, dealer in general merchandise, St Anthony, began business in August, 1881, in a small room, which he has since enlarged. He carries a well selected stock, consisting of almost every article in any line of goods. He does about an $8,000 business annually, dealing largely in produce. Mr. Hosenour was born in Dubois. .County in February, 1853, being the youngest child in a family of four sons and three daughters, born to the marriage of Martin Hosenour and Tharsela Kaeruer, both natives of Germany, from which country they came to the United States soon after their marriage. They  located in Louisville, where they remained only a short time when they came to Dubois County, where the father died in 1861. The mother is still living. Henry remained at home with his mother until he was fourteen years old He then worked in his brother's store for eleven years. July 22, 1878, he married Elizabeth Miller, a native of Louisville, by whom he is the father of four children: George W., Mary A., Elizabeth and Rosa. After his marriage he worked for his father-in-law on the farm until he came to St. Anthony, and engaged in his present business. Both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.


 JOHN KLEM, ex-trustee of Jackson Township, is a native of Pittsburgh, Penn., born April 10, 1842. He is the eldest of nine children born to the marriage of Michael Klem and Jane M. Schneider, both natives of Germany. The father, when a young man, came to the United States and located at Pittsburgh, where he worked at the stone-mason's and brick-layer's trade until about 1853, when he came with his family to Dubois County. He settled on a farm which he had bought some years previous and upon which he still resides. The mother died about 1859. John was reared at home, receiving his education in the schools of his native State. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Forty-ninth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, with which he served, participating in all its battles and marches until mustered out in November, 1864. He was present at the battles of Chickasaw Bluffs, Champion Hills, Vicksburg and numerous lesser engagements. In 1866 he bought the farm of eighty acres upon which he has since resided. October 27, 1868, he was united in marriage with Kate Ands, a native of the county, and to their union have been born seven children: Michael, Jacob, Joseph, John J. (deceased), Frank, Mary and John M. Both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served two terms as trustee of the township.


  FRANCIS LEISMAN, a farmer of Jackson Township, was born in Oldenberg, Germany, April 3, 1835, being the eldest in a family of six sons and three daughters born to the marriage of John P. Leisman and Margaret Klem, also natives of Germany. The father, who was a farmer, came with his family to the United States and located at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he remained until 1842. In that year he came to Dubois County and located in Jackson Township, where he still lives. The mother died in October. 1850. Francis, when a boy, was sent to Pittsburgh by his parents in order that he might attend school. He remained about eighteen months, receiving instruction in both German and English. June 5, 1860, he was united in marriage with Christina Berg, after which he bought the farm of eighty acres where he still lives. He and wife are members of the Catholic Church. They are the parents of twelve children, seven of whom are living. In politics he is a Democrat, and is now serving his second term as trustee of Jackson Township.


 JOHN MERKLEY, a native of Dubois County, Ind., was born June 21, 1847. He is one of a family of six sons and one daughter born to the marriage of Frank Merkley and Francis Hengstler, natives of Germany. The father, when a young man, came to the United States and located at Pittsburgh, Penn., where he worked in a glass factory for eight years. He then came to this county and bought a farm in Ferdinand Township, where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1866. The mother is still living with her son, at the advanced age of seventy seven years. John was reared at home, receiving a fair education in the common schools. At the age of twenty-three he bought the farm where he now resides, and began farming for himself. He now has 280 acres of as good land as can be found in the township. May 16, 1870, Mr. Merkley was joined in marriage with Katharine Fisher, a native of the county and a daughter of Andrew Fisher. They have eight children, seven of whom are living. They are Andrew, Sophie, William, Joseph. Mary, Philomine and Frank E. Both he and wife are members of the Catholic Church.


 CHARLES G. SCHNECK (deceased) was born in Wittenberg. Germany, October 18, 1827. He was one of a family of four sons and an equal number of daughters born to the marriage of Heinrich P. Schneck and Christina Green, also natives of Germany, where they passed their lives. Charles G. was reared at home on the farm, where he remained until 1851, when he came to the United States and located near Jeffersonville, Ind. He worked there on a farm until 1855. September 10 of that year he was united in marriage with Sophie Spiddler, also a native of Wittenberg, who came to America one year previous. Soon after they cams to Dubois County and bought a farm in Hall Township, where they lived until 1864 In that year they bought the farm of 240 acres, where he resided until his death, which occurred May 15, 1881. He was a very successful farmer, and occupied a high place among the enterprising men of the county. His death was a loss not only to his family but to the entire community. He was the father of five children: Henry P. (deceased), George W., Paulina (now Mrs. Jacob Frick, Jr.), Mary and Sophie. Henry P. was a young man of rare ability and gave promise of a brilliant career. He graduated at the Louisville Medical College, taking the first honors of the class of 1883. His death occurred May 1, 1884.


 JOHN F. SCHURZ, a prominent farmer of Dubois County, is a native of the county, born March 5, 1852, being the eldest of a family of three sons and six daughters born to George F. and Charlotte (Bretz) Schurz, both natives of Germany. The father, at the age of sixteen, came to the United States, where he followed steam boating on the Mississippi and its tributaries for eight years being first mate during a part of that time. For about two years he was also on an ocean steamer. After leaving that business he worked at various places until about 1849 or 1850, when he came to Dubois County and located near the present site of Bretzville, where he opened a general merchandise store which he conducted in partnership with Phillip Frick for a short time. He then bought the farm when our subject now lives, and was engaged in a mercantile business there until his death which occurred May 17, 1871. He served for a time in the Mexican war, and was a member of the Masonic fraternity. The mother died February 24, 1869. John F. was raised at home, receiving his education in the common schools, and also attended the Evansville Commercial College for a time. In 1873 he engaged in a general merchandise business at Bretzville with J. N. Deindorfer, but continued only a few months. November 29, 1875, he was united in marriage with A. M. Bartley, a native of Dubois County. They have since resided on the home farm. They have one child, John F. J., born August 12, 1876. Mr. Schurz is a Democrat in politics and was for four years a justice of the peace.


 CYRIN THOMAS, Reverend Father of St. Anthony's Church, was born at Marion, Grant Co., Ind., January 1, 1853, being the sixth of thirteen children born to the marriage of Enoch G. Thomas and Jane Votaw. The Thomas family is one of the oldest and largest families in the country; is of Welsh descent, and the earliest trace of it in this country is found in South Carolina. The first settlement made by the family in Indiana was in Wayne County in 1810, when John Thomas came with his family from his native State and settled near Richmond. A large number of his descendants are still residents of that county. Enoch G. Thomas, when a child, removed with his parents to Grant County, Ind., where he grew to manhood, was married and lived until 1857. In that year he moved to Wabash county, and in 1870, to Huntington, Ind., where he now resides. He is a practical miller and mill-wright, and is at present the president of the Huntington Mill Company. Of the maternal ancestors of the subject, the earliest record is of one Isaac Votaw, who was descended from French ancestors, and was born in Pennsylvania, January 29, 1744. He married Ann Smith, in Bucks County, Penn., February 11, 1768. Both were numbered among the peaceful followers of George Fox, and their marriage was solemnized according to the ceremonies of the Quaker Church. Cyrin Thomas was reared at home, receiving a good general education. He attended South Wabash Academy about two years, and the Rural Home Institute at Huntington one year. In 1874 he entered St. Meinrad's College when he was ordained to the priesthood in 1880. The next two years was prefect of that institution, and in September, 1883, he came to St Anthony. He is now very acceptably engaged in ministering to a congregation of ninety-six families, and is pushing on to completion a new church, a history of which appears in this work.