CARNES, Josef R. - Fountain County INGenWeb Project

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CARNES, Josef R.

Source: Crawfordsville Journal-Review, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana, Feb 2, 1970 p 3

Dr. Josef R. Carnes, 66, musician and composer, died at 8:30 a.m. Sunday at his home in Hillsboro. He had been confined to a wheelchair the last 37 years and had been blind for 8 years. He was born March 8, 1903 at Danville, Ill a son of Edwin and Ida Mae Wells Carnes. He was a veteran of WWI, and began composing at the age of 19. At 21 he received a doctor's degree from the Veteran's School of Music at Chicago. He was a concert organist and also was organist at Chicago theaters. Later he served two years at the Strand Theater at Crawfordsville. He moved from Chicago to Hillsboro 40 years ago. He was a member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Playwrights since 1950. He received two Madelyn Arrington Awards for distinction in musical achievements in addition to numerous other awards for his compositions. His music has been performed in most states in this country and in 80 other countries. Since becoming blind Dr. Carnes used a Braille typewriter in his work. With the assistance of his housekeeper of 26 years, Mrs. May Waggoner, he continued his work until shortly before his death. Survivors include a sister, Dr. Charmion Carnes of Denver and a brother, Russell Carnes of Kalamazoo Michigan. Funeral services will be conducted at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday in Crumley-Williams Funeral Home with Rev. Walter C. Williams of the Hillsboro Methodist Church officiating. Burial will be in Rose Hill Cemetery. Friends may call at 4-9 p.m. Tuesday.


Dr. Josef R. Carnes, 66, well-known musician and composer, died at his home in Hillsboro at 8:30 a.m. Sunday (Feb. 1, 1970). He had been dismissed from the Veterans Administration Hospital in Indianapolis, where he had been a patient for a short time, on Jan. 15. Dr. Carnes had been a wheelchair invalid for 37 years and blind for about eight years. Born March 8, 1903, in Danville, Ill., he was the son of Edwin and Ida Mae Wells Carnes. He served in the armed forces at an early age during World War I and received a medical discharge. At 21, he received his doctorate at the Veteran School of Music in Chicago. He had begun composing music at the age of 19. Dr. Carnes was a concert organist and pianist - serving as organist in Chicago theaters and at the Strand Theater in Crawfordsville. He came to Hillsboro from Chicago about 40 years ago. He was a member of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) since 1950. Dr. Carnes received two Madelyn Arrington Awards of Honor and Distinction and other cash awards for his compositions of lyrics and instrumental music. He has received many recognitions in Indiana, as well as many other states in the United States. Included in his compositions are "Love One Another," used in the Christian Record Talking Magazine, published for the blind; the "O.A.S. March," dedicated to the Organization of American States and played in Washington, D.C. by the Marine Corps Band, and the "March of the Astronauts," the cover designed for which was suggested by President Lyndon B. Johnson in a letter to Dr. Carnes in 1966. Other songs written by Dr. Carnes included the official "Danville High School March," "Nebraska," "Marching in Kentucky," "Alaska March," "Speedway March" and "Honor Above All," Of all his compositions, the ones he cherished the most were "Indiana" and "Your Face Was Made To Smile." A versatile composer, he wrote not only marches but also religious and popular numbers. Much of his music was sent overseas into approximately 80 countries, all free of charge. Since becoming blind he had made use of the Braille typewriter, and with the assistance of his nurse and housekeeper, Mrs. May Waggoner, he continued his composing and publication until recently. Mrs. Waggoner has been with Dr. Carnes for 26 years. Survivors include a sister, Dr. Charmion Carnes of Denver, Colo., and a brother, Russell of Kalamazoo, Mich. Services Wednesday at the Crumley-Williams Funeral Home in Hillsboro, with the Rev. Walter C. Williams of the Hillsboro Methodist Church officiating. Burial in Rosehill Cemetery in Hillsboro.
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