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VARIOUS OBITUARIES & DEATH NOTICES - PART 2
The first Obituary pages got too large so I am continuing here. My notes in this color purple. I have also added a link to findagrave when I could find one.


NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - SEPTEMBER 22, 1927
OBITUARY
"What is life father?"
"A Battle my child.
Where the strongest lance may fail,
Where the wariest eyes may beguiled
And the stoutest heart may quail."

"What is Death, father?"
"The rest, my child,
When the strife and toil are o'er,
When the angel of God, so calm and mild,
Says we need fight no more.

In the battlefield of life,
Bids the din of battle cease.
Takes the banner and spear from the failing hand,
And proclaims an eternal peace."

     Alice Cary Wilkerson, daughter of Thomas and Louisa Wilkerson, was born in Scipio, Indiana, March 28, 1856. She was the youngest of thirteen children. Her parents and brothers and sisters have all gone before.
    In 1870, she united with Scipio Presbyterian church. Charles Butler and other of their young friends uniting at the same time.
    She was united in marriage to Charles D. Butler, January 19, 1881. To this union were born four children. Charles Thomas Butler, Richmond, Va; Florence Louise Litchfield, North Vernon, Ind., Gordon Hubert Butler, Duluth, Minnesota, Marguerite Alice Whitcomb, Scipio, Ind.
    She was an ideal mother, always thinking of husband, children and home. For them she gave "Long years of love and service brave. For them her youth was spent. There was no weight of hurt or care, Too heavy for her strength to bear. She followed where they went. Her courage and her love sublime, They could depent on all the time."
    Yet stronger even than this love, was her love for her "Master", whom she so devotedly served throughout the years. Father and mother together leading their children in the way of the Lord. To Scipio Presbyterian church she has been a power, giving freely of her talents. In the ladies work of the church she was always to be depended upon.     Giving her heart to her "Master", family, friends, church, and community, on Saturday, September 17, 1927, in the very early hour of the day, came the summons.
"Well done, thou good and faithful servant.
Enter thou, into the joy of thy Lord."
    Having fought her battle of Life for 71 years, 5 months and 20 days, she has gone to receive her crown and her eternal peace.
    Leaving her husband, Charles D. Butler, her children, Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Butler, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Litchfield, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Butler, Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Whitcomb; her grandchildren, Charles Thomas and David Shirk Butler, Alice Louise and Georgeanna Litchfield, Gordon Hubert and Robert Dunning Butler, Hiram Charles and Robert Butler Whitcomb, other relatives and a host of friends to say.
Not "Goodbye: but in some brighter clime bid
Her "Good Morning."
    "When sorrow comes as come it must.
In God, a man must place his trust.
No words which we have power to say.
Can take the sting of grief away.
That power which marks the sparrows fall.
Must comfort and sustain us all.
And only he may stand serene.
Who has a faith on which to lean."

"If living were the whole of life,
To end in seventy years,
How pitiful its joys would seem,
How idle all its tears,
But this brief journey that we know.
As life, must really be.
The gateway to a finer world.
That some day we shall see."

    John says of that wonderful home that Jesus is preparing in the finer world.
"I saw no temple therein; for the Lord God the Almighty, and the Lamb, are the temple thereof.
And the city had no need of the sun, neither of the moon, to shine up on it; for the glory of God did lighten it and the lamp thereof is the Lamb. And there shall be no night nor more and they shall need no light of lamp neighter light of sun; for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign for ever and ever."

"O World, O Earth why strive ye?
Join the low chant they sing-
O Grave, where is thy victory!
O Death, where is thy sting!" findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER & REPUBLICAN - SEPTEMBER 19, 1918
OBITUARY
    Florence A. Wahl eldest daughter of John W. and Nancy A. Spaulding was born at Greyford, Ind., July 15, 1884 and departed this life August 31st, 1918, at Alberquerque, New Mexico, age 34 years, one month and sixteen days. She was married to Fred J. Wahl, September 24, 1904 at Madison, Ind., by the Rev. Snyder and lived a peaceful and happy life together.
    Early in life she united with Freedom Baptist Church and remained a faithful member until she made North Vernon her home when she placed her membership letter with the North Vernon Baptist Church where she was a fervent worker until her health prevented her further duties.
    Very early in life her mother departed this world to take up her abode in the land of bliss. Florence being the eldest of the children, played the part of a mother unto the rest of the children, and did it faithfully until they were all grown.
    She is survived by a husband, father, four brothers, six sisters and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her departed life. May her spirit rest in peace.
    The funeral services were conducted from the Baptist church at North Vernon, Ind., Sept. 5th, 1918 at 11:30 A.M. Rev. A.J. Cory officiating, and the remains were laid to rest at Old Vernon, Ind. findagrave link

DEATHS
    YOUNG-William Young, aged 65 years, died at his home on Kellar Street, Tuesday, September 17th. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Don Davis, at the residence Wednesday morning, and the body was taken to North Madison for burial. He is survived by eleven children: Omar and Charles of Indianapolis; Thomas of North Madison; John, Graham, Mary, Helen, George and Fred of this city; Leonard who is with the American Expeditionary Forces, in France; and Chester, who is in military service at Camp Taylor, Ky.

NORTH VERNON SUN - SEPTEMBER 4, 1930
Geneva Township Citizen Died Sunday
    Mr. George Waughtel, 91 years of age, died at his home in Scipio Sunday afternoon at two o'clock after an illness of six weeks of old age infirmities.
    He was a retired farmer having come to Scipio to live following the death of his first wife seventeen years ago.
    He had voted in the same precinct for seventy years, was a Democrat and served as township trustee for four years.
    In early life he was married to Miss Kate Petree who preceeded him in death several years ago he was married to Miss Agnes Green who survives him.
    Surviving also are two brothers, John and Charles Waughtel, Sr., and one sister, Mrs. Belle Patton, all of the vicinity of Scipio.
    Funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the home with Rev. Alexander Sharp in charge. Burial took place in the cemetery east of Scipio.

Mrs. Lattimore Dead
    Mrs. Sarah Grace Lattimore,(maiden name Evans) 52 years of age, died at her home on State street Friday night, Aug. 29th.
    Mrs Lattimore was well known and had many friends who where shocked to hear of her death after a very short illness.
    The funeral services were held at the M.E. Church at two o'clock Monday afternoon conducted by Rev. Hart and the burial took place at Hill Crest under the auspieces of the Royal Neighbors.
    She is survived by her husband Forrest Lattimore, and two children Burr Lattimore and Mrs. Doris Coryea.
TRIBUTE OF RESPECT
    The members of Hill Crest cemetery Association deeply regret the passing away of one of their devoted members. Mrs. Grace Lattimore. She was serving her second term as a member of the Board of Directors. Her zeal in the promotion of the work was unbounded. Always ready and willing to do more than her share for the welfare of the organization. We feel we have suffered a deep loss in the untimely death of this highly respected member, and extend to the bereaved husband and family and relatives our sincere sympathy.
Dr. W.L. Grossman, Pres.
Mrs. Emma Green, Sec.-Treas.

NORTH VERNON SUN - NOVEMBER 3, 1921
OBITUARY
    Mrs. Josephine Klein Mangold was born at New Alsace, Indiana, March 12, 1852 and departed this life at her home near North Vernon, October 29, 1921. Although she had been ill for several weeks her condition was not regarded as serious until Saturday morning when she became suddenly worse and the end came within ten minutes. She leaves a husband, four sons and six daughters three sisters and two brothers and a large host of relatives and friends to mourn their loss.
    Funeral services were held Monday morning at St. Ann church conducted by Rev. Edw. Bauer and the remains were laid to rest in the St. Ann Cemetery.
    Mrs. Mangold had a very wide acquaintance having spent most of her life in Jennings county and was held in high esteem by all who knew her, being always forgetful of self and thoughtful of others. At home she was a faithful and devoted wife and a kind and loving mother. She was always ready to sacrifice for the welfare and happiness of her family. She bore her sufferings patiently and during her entire illness her smile and cheerful words made it impossible for those at her beside to realize how much she endured.
    In 1870 she was united in marriage to Peter Hill to which union were born four children, Louis and Peter Hill and Katherine Herbert who now live at Falmouth and Mary Kyler of Indianapolis. Have been left a widow by the death of her husband she was united in marriage to Joseph Mangold in 1882. To this union were born six children. John of Falmouth, Frank of Indianapolis, Anna Sumann of Rushville and Christina, Lena and Regina who live at home.
    The grief which has entered the home through the loss of their dearest one can only be borne by the thought that her soul rests in peace and trusting all things in the hands of God we bow our heads and say "Thy will be done."
    Mother you are gone but not forgotten,
    Nor will your memory ever fade;
    Our sweetest thoughts will ever linger.
    Round the grave where you are laid.
findagrave link
CARD OF THANKS
    We wish to extend our most sincere thanks to our many friends who so kindly assisted during our sad bereavement, the illness and death of our dearly beloved wife and mother. Also doe we extend thanks to the Rev. E.J. Bauer, Dr. W.L. Grossman and Undertaker Rapp for their services and consoling words, to those who furnished conveyance and to those who sent floral and spititual offerings.
Joseph Mangold and children.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - MAY 14, 1892
    James and Ann Barth met with a sad bereavement in the loss of two of their children, Johnny and Lillie, who died within a few hours of each other. Confusing cemetery listing it has these two children dying about a month apart.) findagrave links Johnny & Lillie

VERNON JOURNAL - FEBRUARY 27, 1903
Death of B.C. Baker
    B.C. Baker,(Benjamin Clark Baker) aged 68 years, another one of Vernon's pioneer citizens died of paralysis last Saturday and was buried on Sunday afternoon. The funeral was preached at the home of the deceased after which the Odd fellows of Vernon conducted the remains to the Vernon cemetery.
    The death of Mr. Baker was a shock to the people of the county as he had always enjoyed good health. On Saturday morning he and Edward Johnson were driving into the country north of North Vernon when Mr. Baker complained of feeling queer and in a few moments tumbled out of the wagon into the snow. Johnson carried him into the house of a neighbor and afterwards brought him home in and unconscious state and in this condition he died.
    Deceased was born in Barbarsville, Pa., Nov. 15, 1834. He came with his parents to Madison and later to this county. He was married to Margaret Butler in 1859 and to this union four children were born two sons and two daughters. The wife, two sons and one daughter survive him. He is the last of his father's family--two brothers and a sister having died before.
    Mr. Baker had never been sick abed for the past 3 years. He was one of the county's leading pump dealers and in former years sold many pumps in Columbus and Madison.

VERNON TIMES - AUGUST 15, 1913
CAPT. HUDSON IS DEAD
    It was not the editor's good fortune to know Capt. Hudson, but from the reports of those who did know him we are convinced that he was a man of sterling qualities and generous impulses. He was Captain in two companies during the Civil War-one in the 27th and the other in the 120th Ind. Vols. He entered the eternal camping grounds last Tuesday morning and his seventy-nine years of life was full of good deeds. The grief that was felt after his long carrier was widespread and sincere. Lloyd Hudson, deputy clerk of the circuit court, is a son.
    Since writing the above the following obituary has been furnished us.
Obituary
    James Davis Hudson, was born in Jennings county Indiana, on the 27th day of March, 1834, and departed this life on the 12th day of August, 1913, at 12:10 a.m., age 79 years 4 months and 15 days.
    In his younger day he united with the Coffee Creek Christian church. In the year 1883, he moved to North Vernon, Indiana, and when the church was organized there he transferred his membership to that church. He retained his membership to the time of his death and was an earnest and zealous worker in its behalf.     On the 3rd day of November, 1853, he was married to Eliza Jane Thomas, of Jennings county, Indiana, and to this union was born four children, viz., Lloyd G., Dora, Mary B., and Morton T. Hudson; Mary Bell and Morton T., or "Tima" as more familiarly known, died in 1882, leaving Lloyd G. and Dora who are still living. The mother died at Harriman, Tennessee, May, 1901 and was interred in the cemetery at this place.
    In 1861 he enlisted in the 27th, Ind. Vo's, and was promoted to a Lieutenancy. After a service of about one year he resigned and came home and re-enlisted in Co. K., of the 120th, Ind. Vo's, and by his knowledge of army tactics and valorous deeds was promoted to a captaincy of his company, which position he held with honor to himself and his company until the close of the war. He was engaged in some of the most important engagements of the rebellion, such as battles of Franklin and Nashville, Tenn.
    Since moving to North Vernon, in 1883, he had been engaged exclusively in insurance business, and by his square dealing and honest with his patrons retains their regard to this time.
    For several years past an incurable malady has been creeping upon him, yet through it all he manifested cheerfulness, patience and heroism equal to the soldier in battle, and when to this affliction was added the last fatal illness and his feeble body was almost overwhelmed yet he did not complain, but said had only a short time to live anyway and he was ready to go. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - MAY 22, 1930
Well Known Citizen Was Buried Monday
    The remains of Henry Miller, aged 75 years, who died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Margaret Eder. Indianapolis, Friday evenings at 8:30 o'clock, were brought here in the Diekhoff ambulance Saturday morning.
    The body was taken to the home of another daughter, Mrs. Homer Ogden, on Hoosier street, from where the funeral took place Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's church. Burial was in St. Mary's cemetery.
    Mr. Miller, since the death of his wife fourteen months ago, was making his home with his son, H.G. Miller, on O. & M. avenue.
    Three weeks ago he left for a visit with his daughter, Mrs. Eder at Indianapolis. Altho failing in health for months, Mr. Miller was of the opinion this visit would strengthen him, but he became wearker, until Friday, when he breathed his last.
    Mr. Miller was a democrat of the old school. In 1879 when he first came to this city he was nominated by the domoratic party as a candidate for city clerk and was elected by a handsome majority.
    Just in recent years he served this city as councilman at large one term, was an unsuccessful candidate for county treasurer twenty years ago; served as trustee of Center township two terms, part of which time was during the flu epidemic which proved so disastrous to many of our families in this county.
    He was a very devout member of St. Mary's church and a great friend of the poor.
    Surviving are two sons, H.G. Miller and L.J. Miller of this city; three daughters, Mrs. Margaret Eder and Mrs. George Rhoads of Indianapolis and Mrs. Homer Ogden of this city; two sisters, Misses Caroline and Elizabeth Miller of this city; fifteen grandchildren and two great-grand-children. findagrave link

THE JENNINGS COUNTY NEWS - JANUARY 23, 1930
FALLS DEAD AT HOME HERE
Mrs. Donnell Dies; Barefoot Son Goes After Aid In Snow
    Mrs Laura Donnell, aged 48, died of cerebral hemorrhage Saturday night at her home on Poplar street. According to her son, Emuel, who was with her at the time of her death, the two were sitting by the fire listening to radio music when Mrs. Donnell received the stroke. Emuel had removed his shoes and stockings and was warming his feet preparatory to retiring. His mother had just just made a remark concerning the music when the youth looked up and saw her fall to the floor.
    Barefooted and bareheaded the terrified son ran from his home to the east side of the B & O freight yeards in the west-end where his father was working to find him, Emuel told some employees to notify his father at once while he returned to a neighbor's telephone and called Dr. D.W. Matthews.
    The son's feet were lacerated about the toes by the snow and stones, but no ill effects resulted from his efforts to locate his father.
    Funeral services were held for the deceased Tuesday morning at the Pilgrim Holiness church on Poplar street. Burial in Hillcrest cemetery.
    She leaves the husband, four brothers, two sisters, and five children. findagrave link

MILITARY RITES MARK BURIAL OF LEGIONAIRE
    Funeral services were held Saturday morning at the St. Joseph's church at Four Corners for Edward Megel, aged 41 years, who died of tuberculosis last week in Albuerque, New Mexico. Members of the local American Legion post buried the former charter member of the Legion with military honors at the St. Joseph's cemetery.
    He leaves a father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Megal of Hayden, and one brother, Joseph of Indianapolis. findagrave link

RITES FOR JACOB FOBEL HELD HERE WEDNESDAY
    Jacob Fobel Jr., aged 83, well known merchant of this city, died of complication Sunday evening at his home on Jennings street. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. L.V. Rule Wednesday afternoon at the residence. Burial in the Vernon cemetery.
    He is survivied by two sons, Walter of this city, Albert of St. Louis, and one grandson, also of St. Louis. findagrave link

QUEENSVILLE MAN IS BURIED TODAY
    Solum (Salem)M. Wilbur, aged 68 years, died of complications Tuesday morning at his home in Queensville. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. Thos. J. Hart Thursdy morning at 10 o'clock at the Queensville Christian church. Burial in the Queensville cemetery.
    He leaves the wife, three sons, and two daughters.

VERNON BANNER - OCTOBER 10, 1883
DIED
    CARNEY-At his residence near Butler's Switch, on Friday. January 5th, 1883, Mr. Henry Carney,Sr, in the 71st year of his age.
    Mr. Carney was one of the early settlers of Vernon township, and was well known throughout the county.
    The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Spillman, in the Vernon Baptist church, on Sabbath morning, after which the remains were interred in the Vernon Cemetery.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JUNE 15, 1882
Butlerville Column
DIED-On Saturday morning, June 10, 1882, at his residence in this township, of heart disease, J.C. Lee, age about 58 years. He was buried at Otter Creek grave yard, on Monday, June 12. The ceremonies of the occasion were conducted by Masonic Lodge and assisted by Odd-fellows, he being a member of both orders. His funeral was said to be the largest one ever occurred in the township if not the county. There was supposed to be about 500 persons in the procession. Mr. Lee was an honest and upright citizen and had long been identified with the various business interest here, and noted for his kindness and charity to the poor. He will be missed and mourned by a large circle of friends and relatives. His death was quite sudden. He died within one hour from the first time he was heard to complain. He had symptoms similar to those with which he died at times for a year or more. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - NOVEMBER 18, 1880
DIED
CARNEY-At his residence, in Vernon, on Saturday. November 13th, 1880. Mr. John Carney, aged 37 years.
    The remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery on Sunday, after appropriate service at the Baptist church, and were followed to their final resting place by a host of mourning friends and relatives. findagrave link

Obituary
Died-November 9th, 1880, at the residence of Andrew Bauman, her son, in North Vernon, Mrs. Cynthia Bauman, aged 76 years.
    Mrs. Bauman was the mother of 12 children, seven sons and five daughters, five of whom, three sons and three daughters still survive her. She wsa born in the year 1804 in the year 1804 in the kingdom of Baveria, Germany, and was married to Jacob Bauman in 1829. In March 1832 she with her husband and her sons left their place of birth in search of a new home and emigrated to the so-called promised land. Arriving in Kelso township, Dearborn county, Indiana in October 1832, where the little family settled in the wilderness to struggle for a living as good as they could, when suddenly husband and father were called from her side by the All Wise Providence, leaving her to care for a large family, nearly all depending on her for support. But her faith in God and her untiring energy enabled her to successfully raise her large family five of whom she followed to their graves after arriving at their majority. (I find in census records Jacob Bauman's wife listed as Frances?)

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - MARCH 22, 1876
DIED
    At his residence in Newton county, Indiana, on the 14th day of February, 1876, Mr. Andrew Tweedy, in his 65th year.
    Deceased was born in Ohio, March 1st, 1811. Came to this county in 1819, where he resided until April 1864, which time he removed to Newton co. A brother and sister survive him. He leaves a wife and nine children to mourn his loss. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - NOVEMBER 18, 1909
OBITUARY
    Frances A. Vawter was born June 7th, 1821, in Jefferson county, Ind., near Madison. She was the daughter of William and Frances Vawter. When a small child she came with her parents to Jennings county, Ind. They located three miles from Vernon on the Muscatatuck, long known as the "old Vawter homestead," there she lived until her marriage to George King on May 14, 1840. They took up their abode on ahill in sight of her old home and there she spent the remainder of her life. She was converted at the age of eighteen and placed her membership in the Baptist church, afterwards becoming identified with the Christian church of which she has been a faithful member. Her husband died in 1858 and she lived on alone with her children for a time, but for the last 80 years she has made her home with her only daughter. "Aunt Frank" as she was always called, was dearly loved by everyone. Her sweet, gentle disposition, her loving kindness and thoughtfulness for others, her many long years of faithful service for her Master whom she so dearly loved, speaks to us all plainer than words of the love and joy and peace in the life of a true Christian. In her last illness which was of short duration, her thoughts were of her loved ones, anixiety for the welfare of the faithful watchers at her bedside. She had just been sweetly and patiently waiting for the summons "Come" and then slipped gently and quietly away to be at rest. findagrave link

VERNON JORNAL - FEBRUARY 6, 1895
Paris Crossing Column
    The people of Paris Crossing and the surrounding country mourn the loss of Mr. and Mrs. Henry (wife Isabella)Deputy who were buried within two days of each other. The family has the sympathy of all. Henry, findagrave link Isabella, findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - APRIL 20, 1905
Obituary
    Ebert E King was born at the home place 3 1/2 miles east of North Vernon on the 13th of July 1880. He was married to Gertie L. James at Indianapolis on Oct. 22, 1902. There they spent almost a year of their married life when a daughter was born to them, after which the mother only lived a short time till she was called away on Oct. 18, 1903. The daughter, Margaret Goldie only lived 8 months and 11 days until she was called to meet her dear mamma. The father then became ill and in a short time came to his home where he lived until his death. He suffered from his illness a number of months but he bore his sufferings with great patience. He was called to meet his wife, daughter and his eternal rest, April 10, 1905, age 24 years 9 months and 11 days. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - MAY 19, 1910
    ROGERS-Mrs. Jos Rogers, age 72 years, died at her home near Grayford Tuesday. Funeral services were held at the Vernon M.E. Church Thursday, after which the remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery. findagrave link

    LONG-Mrs. Clifford Long, wife of Clifford Long, died at St. Vincent's hospital at Indianapolis last Thursday, as a result of an operation for cancer which was performed three weeks ago. The operation was the only chance she had for recovery, as she had been in poor health for over a year gradually growing weaker the remains were brought to this city Friday evening. Mrs. Long was born in Vernon in 1862, she leaves a husband and one daughter, Charlotte, who is 12 years of age. Funeral services were conducted at the family residence Sunday afternoon by Rev. Erving, of the Presbyterian church, after which the remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery.
ALLEY
    Mrs. Elizabeth Alley was born near Bethel, Clermont county, Ohio, Oct. 25, 1831, died May 15, 1910, of heart failure, aged 78 years, 6 months and 20 days. She was the third of eleven children, 4 girls and 7 boys born to Solomon and Eunice Leeds. She received part of her education in a log school house at Pisga, Ohio and later at Batavia, Ohio. In 1849 her parents moved to a farm 3 miles east of Vernon. She was married on the 21st of November 1852 to Thos. P. Alley, who died Nov. 29, 1898. For about 7 years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Alley lived on the State road near Vernon, two of his sisters and mother living in adjacent houses. They moved to North Vernon in 1859, cutting down the trees to build their home on what is now Walnut street, but at that time of her death Mrs. Alley had lived for half a century in the house in which she passed away. She was the mother of seven children, Mrs. Eva Earwood and Horace, of Los Angeles, Cal., Frank, George and Mrs. Geo. Meek, of Biefort, Ark. and Mattie Alley, five of whom survive her, Frank and Carrie having preceded their mother. The services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, conducted by the Rev. Mr. Black, after which the remains were interred in the family lot in the city cemetery. In the death of Mrs. Alley North Vernon has lost one of its oldest and most loyal residents and her family a faithful and devoted mother, and friends whose place can never be filled.
RUST
    Abram Rust, a pioneer of Jennings county, aged 85 years died at the home of his son in Newton county, Indiana, Sunday, and his remains were brought to this city Tuesday morning to be taken to Vernon for interment. Mr. Rust, familiarly known to a wide circle of acquaintances as "Uncle Abe," spent the major portion of his life on a farm on the banks of the Muscatatuck about three miles south of this city; he reared a large family of children, most of whom live in other sections of the United States; Mrs. James Orrell wife of ex-Sheriff Orrell, is a daughter.(Another possible issue, I can not find where a James Orrell married a Rust, possibly John not James.) findagrave link

NORTH PLAIN DEALER - AUGUST 26, 1918
    T.J. Burtch, one of our older citizens died unexpectedly last Friday morning. He had been in failing health for the past two or three years with heart trouble. He had prepared to go to Shelby County with his sister, Mrs. Eva Burtch, who is here visiting. They were going to visit another sister Mrs. Jane Hargrove. Mr. Burtch had dressed ready to start and walked out a distance in the yard, when he was seen to fall. When members of his family reached him he was dead. He was 68 years of age. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. L.M. Swarthout of Butlerville, at Commiskey Church on Sunday afternoon at two o'clock, burial at the old Coffee Creek church by the side of his wife who died five years ago. Uncle Jeff was a member of the Baptist church at this place and was a good active member as long as he was able to attend. He leaves a daughter, two sons and 12 grandchildren, besides three sisters. Among those from a distance attending the funeral were William Carlock and wife of Seymour, Frank Lewis and wife, of Waldron and John Burtch of Letts. Louis Holder and sister Mrs. Nettie Crow, of Eaton, Ind., were here to attend the funeral of Mr. Burtch, but just as the funeral party was starting for the church, Mr. Holder received a message that his son Clarence was killed Sunday morning at their home in Eaton for him to come at once. He and his sister, Mrs. Crow left for Eaton at once. They were T.J. Burtch's nephew and niece.
    John Burtch spent Saturday night with Mrs. Margaret Hartwell and family, took dinner and supper on Sunday with George Hartwell and family, and spent Sunday night with his sister, Mrs. Grace Layton, near Lovett. He returned to Letts Monday morning. findagrave link

NORTH PLAIN DEALER - JANUARY 5, 1905
Obituary
    Again the Angel of Death has entered the home of Joseph and Deppie Ralstin and taken from there their beloved daughter, Lida I.L. Lida was born in Jennings county, July 19th, 1880, in which she has always been a resident. She has always been a kind and obedient daughter, and a fond and loving sister. Lida united with the Bethel Baptist church in Feb. 1901 of which she has always been a true and faithful member. Lida was of a loveable disposition which won her many friends being loved by all who knew her. when sorrowful or downcast she would go to the organ for consolation being of such a patient disposition that she told her troubles to no one. Lida's sweet voice will be missed in the home calling to father, mother, sister or brother. Her chair is vacant in the family circle which never can be filled. Lida was stricken with a complication of fever on Nov. 28th and for four long weeks bore her suffering without a murmer always looking to the interest of the ones who waited upon her and thanking them for every favor they did for her and maintianed to the last she was better. She departed this peaceful life on the morning of Dec. 25th 1904 our Savior's birthday. She leaves to mourn her departure a sorrowing father, mother, two sisters, four brothers, one sister having gone before, a betrothed and many relatives and friends. findagrave link

NORTH PLAIN DEALER & REPUBLICAN - MARCH 7, 1935
DEATH SUMMONS PROMINENT BANKER
Eusebius P. Trapp, Died in Seymour Hospital, Tuesday March 5th
    Eusebius P. Trapp, sixty-three year old, well-known banker, died at the Shneck Memorial Hospital at Seymour, Tuesday, March 5th. Funeral services will be held Thursday afternoon at the Presbyterian Church at Vernon, conducted by the Rev. M.H. Kennedy. The Burial will take place in Vernon Cemetery. From the standpoint of service, Mr. Trapp was the oldest banker of the county, having been connected with banking institutions for forty years.
    Eusebius P. Trapp was born in Lovett Township, October 29th, 1871 the son of John H. and Missouri (Bailiff) Trapp. He received his early education in the Lovett Township schools and later attended Danville College. He taught school for four years and served as deputy for his father when he was treasurer of Jennings County. In 1896, he was elected assistant cashier of the First National Bank of Vernnon, and became cashier of that institution April 1, 1900, succeeding John S. Morris, who resigned. He was at the time one of the youngest if not the youngest cashier of a National Bank in Indiana, and he served the First National Bank of Vernon as cashier until that institution was taken over by the North Vernon National Bank in the capacity of book-keeper and liquidating agent for the institution until the North Vernon Bank was reorganized as the Union Bank and Trust Company. He remained with the Union Bank and Trust Company, in charge of the insurance department until December 1, 1934, when he accepted the position of cashier of the Dupont State Bank at Dupont, and was holding that position at the time of his death.
    In the year, 1901, he married Miss Anna Wenzel, of Vernon, who survives him, and he also is survived by their five children, Mrs. Henry Hulse, Mrs. William H. Simpson and Mrs. Carl Lunsford, of Vernon; Mrs. Robert Whitcomb of Scipio; and John A. Trapp of LaGrange, Kentucky. One daughter Miss Ruth Trapp, died March 2nd, 1927. Others in the immediate relatives who survive are; his mother Mrs. Missouri Trapp of Vernon; and two sisters, Mrs. Paul Gilbreth of Indianapolis; and Mrs. Nellie Stout, of Vernon.
    He had been in ill health for several months but became worse suddenly, Friday night, and was taken to the hospital for a surgical operation. His death came as a shock to his relatives and a host of friends. findagrave link

NORTH PLAIN DEALER & REPUBLICAN - APRIL 11, 1935
JOHN CORRIGAN DIES AT INDIANAPOLIS
    John Corrigan, seventy-five years old, died at his home at Indianapolis, Tuesday evening, April 9th. Funeral services will be held at St. Joan of Arc Catholic CHurch, at Indianapolis at nine o'clock Friday morning and the burial will take place in Holy Cross Cemetery.
    John Corrigan was born in Jennings County and spent his youth here but had been a resident of Indianapolis for about fifty years. He was a retired member of the Indianapolis Police Department, having had 38 years of service during which time he held every office except chief.
    He had been in failing health for some time but the end came suddenly Tuesday evening, while he was sitting in a chair at his home. He is survived by the widow, Mrs. Nellie Corrigan, one daughter, Miss Mary Corrigan, of Washing, D.C. and two sons, Vernon and Vincent Corrigan, of Indianapolis; also by three sisters Mrs. Ellen Breen and Misses Mary and Clara Corrigan, of Denver, Colorado. findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - JUNE 2, 1911
Deaths
DAVIS
    Elijah Davis a pioneer citizen of Campbell township and known all over the county died last Friday at the home of George Nicholson in that township. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. John Nicholson from the Baptist church at Butlerville last Saturday afternoon. The deceased was 88 years of age.
WARNER
    Isreal Warner, an old citizen of this county, died at his home in Vernon Monday morning after a brief illness. He was 74 years of age. The funeral was held from the Baptist church Tuesday afternoon. Burial in city Cemetery.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JANUARY 15, 1890
Obituary
    Jacob Johnson was born in Stark County, Ohio, May 24th, 1827; came to Indiana in 1847 and was married to Minerva C. McCaslin December 19th, 1859. Their union was blessed with two children, both of who died in infancy. His companion was taken from him by death April 2nd, 1863. He was then married to Jemima Latimore Sept. 29th, 1870, and was united with the Hopewell M.E. church during the same year; since which time he has lived a consistent Christian life.
    Mr. Johnson has been a resident of Jennings and Jefferson counties for 33 years, during which time he has been a prominent and substantial citizen and well liked by his neighbors. On January 10th, 1890, after ten days of servere suffering, he passed quietly away, at the age of 62 years, 7 months and 16 days. He was a kind husband and a devoted Christian. He was waited upon by two excellent physicians and had the best of care but all was in vain. The remains were interred in the Graham cemetery Jan. 11th. On account of sickness of the minister the funeral services were not held. The funeral will be preached at the Hopewell M.E. church sunday morning, Jan. 26th, at 10:30 by Rev. I. Turner. He leaves a wife and a host of friends to mourn his loss. The bereaved wife has the sympathy of the entire community.
NORTH VERNON SUN - JANUARY 15, 1890
LOVETT TOWNSHIP, EAST END
    Jacob Johnson died at his home in this township on Friday last, aged 63 years, after an illness of eleven days. Deceased leaves a wife and a host of relatives and friends to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in the Graham cemetery Saturday. The deceased's sister, Mrs Ellen Ward, from near North Madison, attended the funeral.
    Dr. Wilson, of Deputy, consulted with Dr. Flanders, of Dupont, and the attending physician, in the case of Jacob Johnson, Wednesday. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JANUARY 23, 1908
Fine Old Gentleman Dead
    Peter M. Crane, aged 76 years, died of paralysis at 2 o'clock last Saturday afternoon, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Samuel Covington, on Hoosier street, this city. Mr. Crane was born in Sissonville, W. Va., on January 2, 1832. He was the father of five children, three daughters and two sons, all of whom are living with the exception of one son George, who met death in a railroad wreck several years ago. Mr. Cranes wife died sixteen years ago. Funeral services were conducted Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. Black; after which the remains were laid to rest in the City Cemetery. The children who were here to attend the funeral were: Mrs. F.M. Fewell, of Madison, Mrs. Vern Coombs, of Cincinnati, and Stanley Crane and wife, of Cincinnati.

JENNINGS COUNTY NEWS - JANUARY 1, 1931
OBITUARY
    Charles C. Jordan son of Silas and Loraine Jordan, was born near Vernon, Jennings County, Indiana, June 16, 1855, departed this life on Sunday December 14, 1930, at 4 o'clock A.M. after an illness of long duration.
    Deceased was united in marriage to Miss Jennie C. Tweedy, April 15, 1979, to this union were born five children. Frank, Albert, Fay, George and Carson. The wife and son Albert having preceded Mr. Jordan in death. Albert died 30 years ago. Mrs. Jordan's death occurred October 27, 1926. Thus leaving of the immediate family to mourn his demise sons Frank, George, Carson Jordan and Mrs. Fay Hargesheimer. Also one surviving sister Mrs. Lucy Bolser of this city. Three grandsons: Richard, Ralph and Kesner. Many other relatives and a host of friends.
    In the passing from life into death of C.C. Jordan at early morn on that :Holy Sabbath Day" Vernon citizens were awakened to the realization that although Mr. Jordan's death was anticipated by the family and friends still when the final summons came it was "as a flash of the lightning, a break of the wave," to know that he had passed on, to his rest in the grave.     "Charles" Jordan as the public knew him was a progressive citizen a public spirited citizen, and a big hearted citizen. A leader of his Church, his lodges, and a promoter in all Civic movements.
    He was superintendent of the Vernon Presbyterian Sunday School for over twenty-five years of which Church he was also a ruling elder and most active member. A member of the order of Odd Fellows of Vernon for 43 years and Knights of Pythias over 30 years, having been in business as a Funeral Director the past 42 years.
    Perhaps no man of the conty has been called upon to administer as often in the time of death as well as in times of joy as had he. It is now being recalled that a few years ago during a so-called epedemic of La-Grippe at which period many deaths occurred in our community, Mr. Jordan not only acted as Funeral Director, but that he frequently stood out on severely cold days in Mid-winter at the various Country Church Yards and preached the entire funeral sermons, and it is said by members of his lodge and others who witnessed the funeral rites that his endearing words of comfort to the family of their deceased, have left lasting impressions on their memories. On the other hand he fitted in equally well in times of mirth, and at the Yuletide in the role of Santa Claus.
    He too, has comforted his children in the time of death's in their family circle, today, they remain to be comforted.
    Vernon and Jennings county loses an honored citizen. The children a kind an loving father, the sister a faithful brother.
    Today the Community is mourning his death. One who was gifted with a full measure of "sunshine to our life"
    The good men do, lives after them. Recognizing his nobility of character, his kindness of heart, think not of him as dead. findagrave link
"We see not, know not, all our way is night, with Thee alone is day:
From out the torrent's troubled drift.
Above the storm our prayer we lift
Thy will be done
If for the age to come, this hour
Of trial have vicarious power
And blest by thee our present pain.
Be Liberty's Eternal gain
Thy will be done."


NORTH VERNON SUN - FEBRUARY 24, 1927
MRS. ISABELLA STATEN DIED
    Mrs. Isabelle Staten, colored, age 68 years, died Friday evening at eight o'clock at her home on North State Street. Death was caused an attack of the flu.
    Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Second M.E. church and burial was in the city cemetery.
    Mrs. Staten was a member of the Second M.E. church in this city and had resided in this city her entire life. She is survived by three sons, Harry, George and Forrest Staten all of this city and one daughter, Mrs. Viola McCray of Richmond, Ind. Her husband died about twelve years ago.

VERNON BANNER - APRIL 30, 1879
OBITUARY
    Elias L. Deputy was born in Wood county, Virginia, June 11th, 1816, and died April 15th, 1879, aged 62 years, 10 months and 4 days. He was buried at Mr. Zion Cemetery, on April 17th, W.W. Reynolds officiating. Mr. Deputy came to Marion township, Jennings county, Ind., in 1832 and was married to Mary Rogers in 1835. By his industry the dense forrest into which he moved was soon converted into a beautiful farm, where he spent the remainder of his life. He was the father of nine children, five of whom, together with his wife, survive him. He was strictly a moral man, having the greatest regard for honesty and veracity, his word was a good as his note. For a number of weeks prior to his death he was greatly afflicted, but appeared to be perfectly resigned to his fate. Before his departure he professed faith in the "Blood of Jesus," and said to his family that he had no fears of death, that there was a better state of existence for him than the present. Thus ends the life of one of Jennings county's best citizens. The family have the warmest sympathy of their friends and neighbors in their time of affliction. W. findagrave link

Obituary Contributed by Sam D. Lawson, Columbus, Indiana
DAY-
    Simeon DAY, aged seventy-seven years, died at the home of his son, William DAY, in the Elzea neighborhood, at twelve o'clock Sunday night, September 26th. The funeral was held at the residence, Tuesday morning, and the body was taken to Madison for burial. He is survived by three sons: William, James and John, all of whom reside in Jennings County. Twelve grandchildren and thirteen great-granchildren. John DAY, of Sardinia, was among those who attended the funeral of Simeon DAY, Tuesday.
    I went to the Jennings County, IN. Health Department and found a form for Simeon "Sim" DAY, 1-3-11, Page# 69. It states that he was born 1 March, 1843, in Kentucky, and died 26 September, 1920, in Jennings County, IN. He had been a resident of Jennings County for the last 25 years. He was a farmer and a widower. He died of chronic interstitial nephritis. The father is listed as James DAY. Medical doctor or coroner was J.H. Green, of North Vernon. Funeral home or undertaker is listed as H.H. Dowd & Company, with burial on 28 September, 1920, in the North Madison Cemetery, Jefferson County, IN.
    Additonal information: I have found that Sim DAY was married to Mary Ella FAULKNER on 14 February, 1866, in Jefferson County, IN. Jefferson County, Indiana. Marriage Records---1866--- Compiled by the John Paul Chapter of the D.A.R. Transcription by Ruth Hoggatt Copyright 1996 have Mary down mistakenly as Mary "FORTNER" (should be FAULKNER), to Simeon DAY.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JUNE 1, 1911
    DAVIS - Elijah Davis, aged eighty-nine years, died at the home of his grand-daughter Mrs. George Nickleson at Westport at twelve o'clock Friday May 26th. The deceased was born on a farm on Brush Creek and lived there until about a year ago, when he made his home among his children and grand-children. "Uncle Lige," as he was commonly known was always hospitable and his home was always open to his many friends. The funeral was held under the auspices of the Masons, at the Baptist Church at Butlerville, on Saturday afternoon, and was conducted by Rev. Nickelson. He was laid away in the old Brush Creek Cemetery by the side of his wife. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - APRIL 31, 1919
PIONEER PASSES
    Louis Schwacke, aged 89, pioneer resident, passed to his reward this morning. Death resulted from age infirmities. Deceased was born in Germany and came to this city in 1849 from Cincinnati, where for years he worked as a stone contractor. Surviving are the widow, one daughter Miss Carrie Schwacke; two sons, Charles and George Schwacke and four grandchildren. Funeral services will be held Sunday from the residence and burial in the city cemetery. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - OCTOBER 2, 1903
Last Sad Rites
    Friday afternoon at 2 p.m. the funeral services of the late Marshal, Gustav Schwake, were held at his late residence. One of the largest crowds that ever attended a funeral in this city was assembled there to pay him a last tribute of respect. The services in the house were conducted by Rev. Goodloe after which, to accommodate the large crowd, the remains were brought outside and the orders of which he was a member took charge. The floral offerings were very beautiful. One very handsome piece was a harp standing about four feet. It was presented by the business men of the city. There were several other very handsome pieces. At the conclusion of the services the remains were laid to rest in the city cemetery. findagrave link

    The funeral of Will Wilkerson was held from his late residence at 10 a.m. It was very quiet owing to the serious condition of his wife who was too ill to leave her bed. The remains were interred at Vernon. (Burial in the family plot at Vernon beside his parents.)

VERNON JOURNAL - SEPTEMBER 25, 1903
Had Been Dead Three Days
    Patrick Quinn, aged 50 years was found dead Saturday morning at his home one and one half miles south of Vernon by Miss Rosa Daily, daughter of Andy Daily and wife.
    Mr. Daily and wife were a sort of guardian for Mr. Quinn and when he had not been seen about the house, which is only a short distance from Mr. Daily's, suspicion that something had happened arose and Miss Rose was sent over to the house to see if he was at home. She peered in at a window and discovered the lifeless body of Quinn lying on the bed. She hurried back home and informedher parents who immediately called the coroner and Undertake Jordan. The coroner held an inquest and gave as the cause of death cardiac dropsy (collection of water on the heart.)
    Undertaker Jordan took charge of the remains and shipped them to Indianapolis Sunday morning for interment.
    Quin was a peculiar man and lived a very secluded life. His relatives live at Indianapolis and furnished the money for his support.

VERNON BANNER - SEPTEMBER 11, 1878
    Mr. John Chaille died at his home in Campbell township, on Monday last, after an illness of several weeks. findagrave link

VERNON BANNER - August 29, 1864
Obituary     Died, at North Vernon, on the 17th September inst., Willoughby Conner, aged seventy-nine years and six months. The event which caused his death adds the more poignant grief to his family friends, who are bereaved of a fond husband, and endeared father, that if his death could have spared him the excruciating torture and suffering which followed the fatal casualty. Mr Conner, on the day of the accident, had left North Vernon where he had been visiting his son, to return to his home near Butlerville, travelling upon the Rail Road. He had reached near a curve in the road, and being of defective hearing, did not perceive his danger in time to secure his escape from injury; but by his his efforts had so far retreated from the track that only his right arm came in contact with the locomotive, by which it was so lacerated and crushed that amputation, as the only means, although with faint hope of prolonging his life, was adopted, and after languishing under his sufferings but a few hours death came to his relief. The deceased was born in Prince William County, Virginia, and was the son of Rev. Philip Conner, who in the year 1820 accompanied his son to Jennings County, than an almost unbroken forest, and who was among the earliest pioneers of Methodist Epescopal ministers in this vicinity. This aged and venerable minister of the Gospel was not permitted long to prosecute his religious labors, but was summonded to appear before his Master whom he had faithfully served, to receive his reward. In the review of the past life of the dead, their eulogy does not exclusively belong to those who had attained at an eminence of military, literary or other fame, but that "virtue which exalteth a nation" will ever have its unaspiring, the pious and self sacrifising spirit, which our departed friend may rightfully and eminently claim for memory. Mr. Conner among his acquaintance, has ever been regarded as a man of piety. The love and spirit of Christ taught by his venerated father had made an early lodgement in his hear, and ever dwelt upon his lips, and characterized his conversation and conduct through life.
    As an ardent and devoted patriot and supporter of our Government, no one could have made a greater sacrifice, than that of a father who cheerfully yielded up five sons, to sustain a war which threatened the liberties of his country, which he cherished, and upon whom he had relied as a staff to support him in his feebleness of age. A short time before his death, the writer of this article was present at a conversation between a citizen of Vernon and the deceased, when the citizen congratulated him that he had been enabled to furnish so many of his family for the support of the war and that all had yet escaped death; to which the deceased replied, "my children were a gracious gift of the Lord, and I early dedicated them to Him in baptism, and when my country needed their service I felt it was my duty to give them up for the preservation of its rights, hoping and expecting the blessings of God upon them, and our Nation. B

VERNON JOURNAL - January 23, 1901
Death of Amos Thomas     Amos Thomas was born in Jennings county, Ind., Feb. 9, 1832, departed this life at his home in Vernon Jan. 19, 1901, after a protracted illness of dropsy and heart trouble. Deceased was married August 9, 1855 to Mary Ann Roseberry who survives him. Of the two boys and three girls born them, all survive but the oldest son Madison, who died May 30, 1898. Those living are Mrs. John Swincher of Vernon, Mrs. Lloyd Hudson of North Vernon, Mrs. O.M. Elder of Greensburg and Monroe Thomas of Vernon.
    After his marriage, Mr. Thomas engaged in the mercantile business near Lovett, at what is known as Poplar Corners, which business he conducted successfully until 1863, when he with others made a prospecting tour west as far as Montana. Upon returning he again took up business at Poplar Corners. Removing from there in 1874 to Vernon, he engaged in the same business up to 1879 at which time he removed to North Vernon to re engage in mercantile pursuits. In 1882 he was elected clerk of the circuit court, which position he filled with credit. After returning from his official duties he again entered the mercantile business with his son. Monroe Thomas, in Vernon, which has occupied his time up to the time of his demise. Amos Thomas united with the Methodist church when a young man and has been most highly regarded through life as a man of high honor and unsullied business integrity. The funeral occurred Sunday at the home, with Rev. S.W. Troyer, after which a large concourse followed the remains to the Vernon cemetery.
Also in the North Vernon Plain Dealer on the same date as above.
    Mr. Amos Thomas, an old and esteemed citizen and merchant, of Vernon, died Saturday at the home of his son-in-law, John Swincher, in the old Robert McCammon property on "The Narrows." Funeral services were conducted at the house Sunday afternoon. Interment in Vernon Cemetery. findagrave link

VERNON BANNER - September 19, 1877
OBITUARY
    Deputy - George W. Deputy was born in Marion township, Jennings county, Indiana, January 21, 1847, and died after a brief illness, in the same locality, September 3rd, 1877. From his youth up Bro. Deputy has been as free from evil habits, doubtless, as any young man of his time, never having practiced those vices so common to young men during and since the war. For over thirty years he lived a strictly moral life, being always just and fair in his dealings, prompt in the fullfillment of promises, considerate honorable in all the relations of life, and consequently a favorite among his associates. But last winter he concluded that a proper regard for his eternal interests required some than mere morality. He united with the Methodist Episcopal CHurch, on probation, February 28th and sought an interest in the hand of Jesus. He was of a mild, quiet disposition, not demonstrative in words or actions, but he was deeply concerned and strongly determined to lead a new life. "Steadfast and unmovable" he thought not of "turning back," but was baptized and received into full connection with the Church one week before he died, August 25th.
    Monday morning, when the hour of separation came, he could say to his weeping friends "I am going to a better world." "I am not afraid to die," and to his two children, "I want you to be good boys and meet me in heaven."
    What a comforting assurance for his grief stricken friends, who like one of old may ask, "can I bring him back again?" and with the same one may be enabled to say "I shall go to him, but he shall not return to me." He was buried at Mount Zion Cemetery, Sept. 4th, the funeral being preached by Rev. B.F. Owens. He leaves a wife, two children, father, mother, brothers, sisters and a host of friends to mourn his departure. Let us strive to imitate his virtues and to meet him in that "better world."        O. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - January 2, 1919
Guy L. Tripp Died Sunday     Guy Leavitt Tripp, one of the pioneer merchants of this city, died at his home on Walnut street Sunday morning from heart trouble.
    Mr. Tripp was bornin this city on December 25, 1840 and was 69 years old at the time of his death. He was the oldest son of the late Col. Hagerman Tripp and in 1873 opened a stove store and tin shop in this city and was continuously in business until about two years ago when he was associated with the Fred H. Tripp Hardware Co., which was a successor to the business established by him.
    In 1874 he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Tate and to this union was born two children, Fred H. Tripp and Mrs. Hazel Moore, both of this city, who with the widow survive.
    Mr. Tripp was always an active man and had been in perfect health until a few months ago when he was stricken with heart trouble which confined him to his home. He always took an active part in city affairs and was a booster for his home town.
    The funeral services were held at the home of his daughter on Norris Avenue Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock, conducted by Rev. P.O. Duncan, of Waynetown, Ind., and burial in the city cemetery. Now Hillcrest Cemetery.

THE JENNINGS COUNTY NEWS - April 3, 1930
VICTIM OF WORLD WAR BURIED HERE
Fred Rapp Succumbs In The St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis
WAS GASSED IN ARGONNE
    Funeral srvices will be held tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock for Fred C. Rapp, aged thirty-eight, who succumbed in the St. Vincent Hospital in Indianapolis and was brought to this city, Tuesday evening.
    "Dutch" Rapp, as the deceased was familiarly known to the citizens of this city, was a charter member of the local American Legion post, having served eighteen months overseas. It was while in the battles of the Argonne Forest, in France, that Mr. Rapp was mortally wounded and gassed, which has been said to have caused the untimely death of the young man.
    Members of the Legion post, assisted by Red Men and members of the Moose lodge, will conduct a full military funeral for the war veteran.
    The obseques will take place tomorrow afternoon at two o'clock at the residence on Fifth street with burial in Hillcrest cemetery.
    He is survived by the widow, one sister, Mrs. J.J. Bock, of Vernon,Texas, and two nieces, Mary Catherine and Martha Rapp, of this city. findagrave link
LOCAL GIRL SUCCUMBS IN MADISON HOSPITAL
    Miss Leona Hare, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Hare of this city, died at four o'clock yesterday afternoon at the Indiana State Hospital at North Madison where she had been ill for some time.
    Funeral services will be held tomorrow afternoon at the residence on South Jennings street, with interment in the Vernon cemetery.
    She leaves the mother and father one brother, Clyde, of Bloomington, and one sister, Mrs. Myrtle Gregory of this city. findagrave link

CHARLIE DAVIS PASSES AWAY
Veteran of This County Passes Away At His Home Here.
WAS CIVIL WAR BUGLER
    North Vernon and Jennings County lost one of their most widely known citizens at midnight, last night when Chas. Davis succumbed at his home on Jackson street.
    The aged gentleman, who died at the age of 81 years, had been in failing health for some time but during it all, found time to appear on the streets of the city for friendly chats with his many friends.
    Charlie, as he was known to every one, was born in Brewersville in 1848. In his recollections, Mr. Davis used to tell of the Civil War days, when he served as a bugler in stirring up volunteers for the cause. He himself was too young at the time to seek active service.
    He is survived by one son, Chester who is a loyal employee of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Chester Davis has been bery close to his father in his last days here.
    Funeral services will be conducted tomorrow afternoon at the Dowd Chapel on Walnut street, at two. Burial in Hillcrest cemetery.
VERNON JOURNAL - JULY 27, 1898
Obituary
    Sarah Ewing was born in Bourbon Co., Ky., March 17th, 1803. When two years old she moved with her parents to Clermont county, Ohio. She was married to James Ewing, Dec. 4th, 1823 and to this union were born twelve children, five boys and seven girls.     They moved with their family to Indiana, where they have since resided in 1851.
    James Ewing her husband, died Aug. 8th, 1891, at the age of 90 years, 9 months, 19 days and she survived her husband until the 16th, inst., on which day she died, being 95 years, 9 months and 19 days of age.
    She was a member of Zion Baptist church for over 50 years and was a consistent Christian mother whose life was a worthy example to her many friends whom she has preceded to the Fair Beyond. findagrave link

Obituary
    Numbered with the past is another one of Jennings county's pioneer citizens, since 7:00 o'clock yesterday morning, when the summons came to Uncle Henry Sullivan to "come up higher."
    Henry Sullivan was born at Lawrence Court House, Lawrence district, near Charlestown, South Carolina, Feb. 11, 1806, died at his home in Vernon, Indiana, July 26th, 1898, aged 92 years, 5 months and 15 days.
    He was for many years a consistant member of the Baptist church and a good and useful citizen, and though for a long time prior to his death, his usefulness was hindered by the loss of his sight, he was the same jovial, light spirited, to the last. Perfectly contented and resigned to the will of God, ready and willing to go at His summons.
    The close of his long life, due to old age came quiet and peaceful and he leaves a large family of relatives to whom a host of friends extend condolence and sympathy. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - FEB 17, 1881
Died
    GETZENDANER - On Wednesday, February 9, 1881, at her residence near this city, of pneumonis, Mrs. Catherine B. Getzendaner, aged 42 years, and 6 months.
Obituary
    Mrs. Catharine B. Getzendaner, was the youngest child of Col. Henry Protzman, was born near Dayton, O., on the 9th day of August, 1838, had 8 children, 7 living, one dying in infancy. Married G.W. Getzendaner on the 5th day of March, 1864. Her mother, whose maiden was Stemble, was the daughter of Capt. Henry Stemble, who served in the war of 1812, and helped establish frontier posts in Ohio and Indiana during their earlier settlement. Mrs. Getzendaner was a kind and affectionare wife and a loving mother, and if she erred it was in her diffidence, and want of confidence in herself; remarkably consistent, she would rather offend her dearest friend than do anything that would offend her maker; modest and retiring, she mingled but little in society, had but few acquaintances; but those that knew her best and could appreciate nobility of character, loved her with the strongest affection. During her illness she often spoke of absent friends, of her sister and brother, who she seemed to remember with the warmest affection. At times her mind reverted back to the days of her happy girlhood, and she spoke often of Lena and Bertha, with whom she attended boarding school, in in whose friendship she seemed to have implicit trust. She was a woman of rare intelligence, well educated and perfectly accomplished, possessing an inate purity of heart unsurpassed in any one we have ever met. Toward the close of her illness she drew her family about her bed and left with them her parting advice and blessing. For her oldest boy, Arthur, she seemed most deeply concerned, admonishing him to shun even the appearance of evil, and to so live as to be able to meet her in a better world. She bore up under all her suffering with Christian resignation, and was often heard to say "Yea, though I walk through the valley and shadow of Death, I will bear no evil, for thou art with me, thy rod and thy staff they comfort me>" MRS. ANNIE MARTIN. Burial Hillcrest Cemetery - not listed on Find a Grave. Our listing has the name misspelled as Gelzentaner.
    Mrs. Getzendaner died at her home near this place on Wednesday. This is the second bereavement Mr. Getzendaner has had to suffer within a couple of weeks, his daughter dying about that long ago.
A Card
    I wish to offer my most heartfelt thanks to the kind neighbors who so freely gave me their assistance in my recent troubles and bereavements. I shall always feel that I owe them a great debt. G.W. Getzendaner.
LOVETT COLUMN
    Mrs. Elizabeth Byfield, wife of B.F. Byfield, of Commiskey, was buried at Hopewell on Feb. 10th. findagrave link
    Died, on Thursday night, Feb. 10th, at his residence, in Centerville, of consumption, James Smith, aged 35 years. Funeral preached at Centerville church, Feb. 12th, by Rev. W. Reynolds, and was buried at the Thurston grave yard.
    Died, on Monday, Feb. 14th, at her residence, in Montgomery township, of heart disease, Mrs. Jane Walton, wife of Abraham Walton; buried at the Hall grave yard to-day. findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - AUGUST 12, 1891
CLYDE WAGNER
    It would seem that our community has had more than its share of the sorrowful visitation of death within the last few months. We have been called upon so often recently, to pay our last respects to some dear friend, but an an unusual thrill of sorrow was felt in this town, when on last Thursday afternoon, the intelligence was circulated that Clyde Wagner was dead. In all classes, young and old, was felt a sincere regret that a young man of such excellent morals and manly qualities might not have been spared to complete a career that only promised usefulness and comfort to those about him.
    He was born in Vernon, in the house where he died, June 6, 1867, and was 24 years and 2 months old. With the exception of a few months he spent his life here. He attended the public schools of Vernon until he was fourteen, when he was afflicted with a terrible illness, which made him an invalid for two years, and from which he never entirely recovered. It was during this trying period that he exhibited very admirable traits of character. Under the most terrible ordeals of suffering, he was uniformly uncomplaining and cheery, often teaching lessons of fortitude and patience by his brave example.
    He was true to his convictions, and with a conscience void of offense, he fearlessly did what he thought was right, under all circumstances.
    He early in life showed a marked aptitude for business and by his integrity and faithful performance of any trust reposed in him, earned the entire confidence of his employers.
    He attended Presbyterian Sabbath School, and for a long time was a member of the late Mrs. Storey's class, and for his teacher he had the highest veneration and esteem.
    The first of last March, he went to Greensburg, Indiana, as manager of a branch business house. About five weeks ago he became ill, and reached home four weeks before he died. For a time his disease seemed under control, but brain complications appeared, and the end came rapidly.
    Thus, we have the record of a life that was brief, but filled with good deeds, and a character stainless and singularly free from the vices taint that so many of the young men of today. His noble qualities had endeared him to a large circle of friends where his vacant place cannot be filled. But he will be missed most in the loving atmosphere of home. The sympathy of every heart goes out to his widowed mother, to whom he has been a joy ever since he came to bless her life; and to the brothers and sister whos associations with him were most loving and tender.
    The funeral services were conducted by Rev. S.E. Barr, of Brownstown, Ind., on Sunday afternoon, at the family residence. The throng of sad faces and the beautiful floral tributes testified strongly to the esteem in which the deceased was held, and many sad hearts followed the beloved form to its last resting place in the beautiful Vernon Cemetery. L.B.W. findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - NOVEMBER 15, 1899
    John Schierling, Sr., an old citizen of North Vernon, died at his home there last Thursday evening of pneumonia, after an illness of two weeks. He was sixty-seven years old. He came to North Vernon in 1865 and has been in business there ever since. Mr. Schierling lost his right hand a few years ago from the bite of an insect and blood poisoning.
DIED
    Dr. Nehemiah Richardson, the oldest practicing physician of the county died at his home here Monday at 5:30 a.m. The Dr. was 75 yrs. 7 mo. 19 days of age. He had practiced in this county and vicinity for over 45 years. The remains were taken Tuesday afternoon to East Carmel, Ohio, for interment. Revs. Gilchrist and Troyer conducted short services at the residence at 1:00 o'clock, before departure.

VERNON JOURNAL - NOVEMBER 29, 1899
Obituaries
    Dr. Nehemiah Richardson, born March 24, 1824, peacefully passed away in death November 13, 1899. Dr. Richardson was born in Middletown township, Columbian county, Ohio, and spent the greater part of his youth near what is now Negley and East Carmel. He received the larger part of his education in the public schools of the township, after which he began the study of medicine, graduating from anumber of the highter medical institutions. He bagan the work of his profession in Western Pennsylvania, where he resided only a short time. Believing that his services were needed in what was then practically the unsettled west, he took up his residence in 1853 at Vernon, Indiana, where he resided up to the time of his death. Besides the practice of mediciane, his services were greatly in demand in counsel and surgery, being called throughout his own state and Western Ohio, and was at various times summoned to Columbia county in professional work.
    While a resident of western Pennsylvania Der. Richardson was united in marriage to a lady who preceded him in death a number of years ago. Of this union there were born two sons, who survive him. In the fall of 1896 he was married to Miss Sadie E. Huston, one of the most successful teachers of Columbiana county. The remains were brought to the home of his father-in-law, J. Cline Huston, where funeral survices were conducted by Rev. E.A. Williams, pastor of the M.E. church, on Thursday November 16, 1899. The singing was conducted by his neices, Misses Eva and Nanie Vale, daughters of Dr. A. G. Vale, a former student of the deceased. According to his expressed desire, burial was made in the East Carmel cemetery, where his mother, brothers and sisters and other relatives lie at rest. A large number of relatives and friends followed the remains of Dr. Richardson to their last resting place. findagrave link
    Margaret Wagner was born in Jennings county, Indiana, April 6, 1827. She was married to John Collett, at Madison, Ind., in the early summer of 1856. To this union was born four girls, three of whom survive her. All of her life was spent in and around Vernon. She united with the Baptist church at an early age and lived a consistant member until her death. She had been a patient sufferer for two and one-half years. Death came to her relief Tuesday morning, Nov. 21, 1899. The funeral services were conducted at the residence, Wednesday afternoon, Nov. 22, 1899, by Rev. Holmes of the Baptist church, assisted by Rev. Troyer, of the M.E. church. The remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery. findagrave link
    John M. Hiller, was born in Jefferson, Penn., the spring of 1825, his youth and early manhood were spent in this town, being engaged in merchandising from near his majority until about the year 1860 when he moved to Clark county, Mo., there engaging in merchandising until some time early in the war when he enlisted in the cause of the Union, serving several years, during which time he was promoted to a Capraincy. After the war he again engaged in merchantile persuits for a period, when he engaged in the employment of the Government. Resigning this position in 1886, since which time he has been engaged in no special business. For the past ten years, he has resided chiefly in Vernon and going frequently to Missouri.
    He departed this life, Nov. 26, 1899, at the residence of the late Dr. N. Richardson, here. The services were conducted by Rev. Troyer of the M.E. church, after which the remains were taken to Kahoka, Missouri, for burial. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON REPUBLICAN - MARCH 7, 1940
AARON F. BAKER CALLED BY DEATH
    Aaron F. Baker, eighty-three years, died at his home in Butlerville, Monday March 4th. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the Methodist Church in Butlerville and the burial took place in Butlerville cemetery. He is survived by the widow and several children.
MARION E. AMICK CALLED BY DEATH
    Marion Elmer Amick, seventy-eight years old, died at his home in this city at about 5:45 o'clock Wednesday night March 6th. Funeral services will be held at the First Methodist Church, Sunday, conducted by the pastor the Rev. R.A. Shumaker, and the Rev. W.L. Dougherty, of the Pilgrim Holiness Church. The burial will take place in Hillcrest Cemetery.
    Mr. Amick had been a resident of this city for a number of years. He is survived by the widow Mrs. Vina Amick, and eight children: John, Herbert and Roy of this city; Verne Amick, who resides in Texas; Ray Amick whose home is in New Mexico, Mrs. Mary Ryan, of Columbus; and Mrs. Helen Benefield and Mrs. Martha Bielefield, of Detroit, Kansas. Four brothers also survive. findagrave link
MRS. D.L. McAULIFFE CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs. Elizabeth Welmer McAuliffe, sixty-five years old, wife of Dr. D.L. McAuliffe, passed away at her home on Lawrence Avenue, Friday, March 1st. Funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Monday morning, the solemn requiem mass being conducted by the Rev. Father Omer Eisenman, pastor of the church, the Rev. Father Pierce Dixon, of Indianapolis, and the Rev. Father Marcellus T. Lambillete, of Norwalk, Ohio.
    Mrs. McAuliffe was born in Botkins, Ohio. Her marriage to Dr. Dennis L. McAuliffe took place in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in the year 1907 they came to North Vernon to reside. She had been in ill health for a number of years but bore her suffering with patience and resignation. She was a devout member of St. Mary's Catholic Church and a member of St. Cecelia Circle Daughters of Isabella.
    Besides the husband, she is survived by four sons; Richard McAuliffe, of Cleveland, Ohio; Joseph McAuliffe, of Wilmington, Ohio; Dr. George McAuliffe, of New York City; and Charles McAuliffe, of Burlington Iowa. She also is survived by two grandchildren. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON REPUBLICAN - JULY 5, 1909
OBITUARY
    Mrs. J.C. Hinshaw, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. F.B. Alley, 3229 Central Ave., Indianapolis, Ind., July 29th at 3;15p.m. at the age of 95 yrs. 7 mo. She was a native of North Carolina, born in Salem, Randolph county. Was of Quaker parentage and is the last of 14 children. Her father, Mr. Wm. Coltrain had quite a large estate and about 100 slaves-but being opposed to slavery he set them free and gave them a small cabin and piece of ground. She was married to Dr. J.P. Hinshaw in Salem, and afterward came over the mountains with a one horse wagon with their two little children and settled in Indiana, near Thorntown about the year of 1840 and in 1859 went to North Vernon, Jennings Co., Ind., where she lived until 1891, when she came to Indianapolis and lived with her daughter until her death, and is survived by two children, Mrs. F.B. Alley of Indianapolis, Mrs. Mary COle of Michigan, six grand-children, two great grand-children and one great great grand-child. Her husband was a Lieutenant in the Union Army during the Civil War and she took great interest in the soldiers and greatly aided the Sanitary Commission in furnishing supplies and provisionsto them while on their way to the Front. She lived a quiet life so characteristic of the Quakers and lived and died in that faith. She was of the sweetest disposition and contented and so uncomplaining during three years and eight months she was confined to her bed and the end came peacefully and with little apparent suffering. She will be interred in their old family buring ground at North Vernon her old home. findagrave link
WESTON COLUMN
    Samuel Tribbet died Tuesday morning of last week after several years of invalidism. He was born in Delaware and came to Indiana when about 21 years of age, and with the exception of two years spent in Iowa, resided continuously in Jennings County. In 1852 he married Serena Spencer, and two sons-Henry C. and Joseph M., both living were born to the union. At the age of sixty years he untied with the Baptist church at Tea Creek and was a reapected member of that organization until his death. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Owens Thursday when the body was laid to rest in the Silent City of the dead there to rest until called from the tomb on Resurection Day. Born November 25, 1823, died July 27, 1909, aged 85 years, 8 months, 2 days. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON REPUBLICAN - OCTOBER 4, 1894
GEORGE A. GREER
    Was born at Covington, Ky., on March 4th, 1842, and died at his home in North Vernon, Ind., December 24th, 1894, aged 52 years, 9 months and 20 days.     He was the second son of Thos. A. and Isabel Greer. Was married to Miss Anna. H. Hawthorne, the eldest daughter of Hon. Jacob Hawthorne, of Kentucky, April 27, 1866. To them were born one son and four daughters, all of whom together with his wife survive him. He came to North Vernon in May, 1884. Prior to this date he was engaged in the mercantile business in the State of Kentucky. He was brought up by Methodist parents, and had great respect and reverence for the church thoughout his life. He was a very generous and charitable man, kind and helpful to the poor. He was also a very kind and loving husband and father. His death was sudden and unexpected, yet he had been failing in health for the past year.
    He was a member of the 41st Kentucky Infantry in the war of 1861-65, and was in some of the heaviest engagements on the Potomac. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER & REPUBLICAN - APRIL 1, 1920
ORRELL - Alexander S. Orrell son of Frank and Mary Orrell was born in Vernon, Ind., October 10, 1864, died at his home in Nebraska, March 27, 1920, aged 55 years 9 months and 12 days. He was united in marriage to Louisa J. Bemish, April 15, 1888. To this union was born one daughter Mrs. Mary Toole. About 17 years ago he united with the Holiness Church in this town. Mr. Orrell has always been a true and loyal citizen neighbor and friend. He was a member of the I.O.O.F. Lodge of Nebraska, No. 553 and was a true and faithful member of the order. Mr. Orrells illness was of short duration and his death a shock to his dear relatives and many friends. Those left to mourn his loss a true and faithful wife a devoted daughter, and son-in-law, James Toole, his mother three brothers, a host of relatives and friends and brother Odd Fellows.
A faithful one from us is gone
A voice we love is still
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled. findagrave link
ERNEST H. TRIPP DIES AT INDIANAPOLIS
    Ernest Hagerman Tripp, aged sixty-five years, died at his home at Woodruff Place, Indianapolis, at about one o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, March 31st. The body will be brought to this city Friday morning and the funeral will take place from the home of his daughter, Mrs. Fred Verbarg, on Jennings Street, at 1:30 o'clock Friday afternoon.
    Ernest H. Tripp was a son of Colonel and Mrs. Hagerman Tripp and was born and raised in Jennings County. He was educated in North Vernon schools and Indiana University. From the time of his early manhood he was a member of the firm of Tripp Brothers, of North Vernon, and went to Indianapolis in the 1894 to take over the management of the firm's interests in that city. He built his summer home here and maintained that home until about six years ago when he located permanently in Indianapolis.
    Perhaps no person of the community had a wider acquaintance than did Mr. Tripp for the Tripp Brothers' interests gave him business connections in many citities, he being actively interested in a carriage manufacturing plant in Cincinnati, mercantile business in Chicago, and coal mining interests in Green County, Indiana. He also had charge of the handling of railroad tax contracts for the railroad companies for a number of years. For the past six years he had been at the head of the Tripp Warehouse Company, at Indianapolis.
    He was a trapshooter of note and this carried his exploits to Europe where he took part in two international shooting matches. He was at all times actively engaged in politics and his wide acquaintance and popularity gave him a strong influence. Although he had established residence at Indianapolis, he maintained a strong affection and lively interest in his native city and county and could be relied upon at all times to use his influence in any matter for the benefit of North Vernon and Jennings County.
    He is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. Nettie Verbarg, of this city, and one brother Albert A. Tripp, mayor of North Vernon.
OBITUARY
    John Casey son of Patrick and Mary Casey was born four miles south of Scipio June 4th, 1859. He was united in marriage to Anna Hulse, September 20th, 1892.
    To this union seven children were born of which five are living. His wife departed this life Feb. 1912. His death on March 2nd. 1920 of asthma came as a shock to his family and friends. For tho he had been in failing health for some time no one expected the end so soon. He was an honest and upright man a loving father, a kind neighbor and true friend, ever loyal and faithful to his church and home. He will be sadly missed by a son, four daughters and a brother of near Scipio, and a brother and sister at Indianapolis, besides other relatives and many friends. The funeral and burial was held March 4th, from the St. Patrick Church, at Scipio. findagrave link
DEATHS
    SHEPHERD-Mrs. Martha Jane Busbee Shepherd, aged eighty-two years, died at the home of her son, Will Shepherd, in this city, Tuesday night, March 23rd. The body was taken to Dupont, Thursday, and the funeral service was held at the Dupont Methodist Church, conducted by Rev. C.P. Gibbs, of this city. The burial took place in the Dupont Cemetery. she is survived by three sons: William L. Shepherd and Miles Oliver Shepherd of this city, and Walter Shepherd, of Dupont. Foourteen grandchildren and thirty-two great-grandchildren also survive. findagrave link
    BECK-Mrs. Margaret Beck, aged thrity-six, wife of Chris Beck, died at the Schneck Hospital in Seymour, at 4:45 o'clock Friday morning, March 26th. She had been in ill health for many months and a surgical operation had been resorted to as a means of prolonging her life, but her condition was such as could not be relieved and she died without regaining cousciousness. She was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thadius Dixon and was born at Paris. Ind. She came to this city when but a small child and North Vernon had since been her home. She was educated in North Vernon public school and after leaving school had taken a position as saleslady at Gumble's store, which place she held until she marriage to Chris Beck, March 14th 1913. She is mourned by her husband and little son, by her parents, and two brothers, Parley Dixon and Clifford Dixon, of this city. Also by a host of friends who held her in high esteem.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JANUARY 10, 1906
YOUNG DENTIST DIES
Dr. Kinder Was Liked by Everyone - Body Taken to Indiana
    At seven o'clock Saturday morning, the spirit left the body of Dr. W.(Walter) J. Kinder. The sad news was hourly expected for three days, and an ominous hush was felt among his friends as they dwelt on the news from his bedside. The short obituary read at the funeral and published below, tells but briefly of his life and appreciation here. He was universally liked and his death universally mourned.
    The funeral was preached at the residence at 10:30 o'clock, Sunday morning, by Rev. Macdonald of the Christian church. The body was taken to the family burial ground in the Tea Creek cemetery near Lovett, Indiana, on the noon train. Rev. Macdonald, A.W. Zeigier, A.L, Maxwell, C.F. Stoll, K.J. Crackel, Geo. W. Lackey, and Noah M. Tohill accompanied the bereaved wife and brother to Lovett. Rev. Macdonald preached the funeral to his relatives, neighbors and friends at the old home.
    Dr. Walter J. Kinder was born, November 7, 1871, at Lovett, Jennings county, Indiana, and grew to manhood on a farm. He united with the Tea Creek Baptist church, in about his sixteenth year. He taught a term of school and later entered the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis, Indiana, from which he graduated in June, 1903. He began the practice of his profession at Crothersville, Indiana where he remained for a little more than one year., coming to Lawrenceville, Illinois, in September 1903.
    He was united in marriage to Clara Louise Joseph, June 10, 1903. The deceased leaves a wife, two children, a mother, five brothers and three sisters and many friends to mourn his departure.
    Dr. Kinder had been among us but a short while, yet in that brief time he had endeared himself to us all. He possessed many manly virtues and but few faults. In the practice of his profession he was careful, courteous and honest; as a man he was courageous, industrious, frank and generous; as a husband and father he was devoted, tender, loving, faithful and warmly apppreciative of the boundless love and steadfast devotion of his loving wife and confiding little children; As a member of the church he was not ashamed of the gospel of Jesus Christ. - Lawrenceville, Ill., Republican, Jan. 1. find a grave link
David Overmyer Is Dead
    TOPEKA, Kas.,-Jan. 9-David Overmyer, probably the most prominent Democratic politician in Kansas, died at his home here tonight, aged 60 years. Mr. Overmyer was a candidate for attorney general on the Democratic ticket at the recent State election and was once candidate for Governor and was well known as a lawyer in Kansas and neighboring States. He was born in Ohio and was an alumnus of De Paw University at Greencastle, Ind. - Indianapolis Star.
    The above startling news was a shock to the people of this city and vicinity, where Mr. Overmyer was widely known. For many years after leaving DePauw University he practiced his profession here in partnership with his brother, John Overmyer, and easily attained the foremost position among the lawyers of that time. Several years ago, believing that a broader field for the exercise of his talent existed elsewhere, he moved into the Great West and located in Topeka, Kansas, where he quickly sprang into prominence in the practice of his profession. He was married in this city early in life to Miss Alice Hicks, daughter of Edward Pitt Hicks, deceased, and sister of Eldo Hicks who is still a resident of North Vernon. The cause of his death was pneumonia. find a grave link
WALES NEIGHBORHOOD
    Mrs. Mollie Matthews died Friday at her home. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Perviance Sunday after which the remains were laid to rest in the Cana Cemetery. find a grave link

VERNON JOURNAL - JANUARY 23, 1895
OBITUARY
    Pearl Rochat Hand was born at Marble Corner, Ripley County, Ind., Feb. 5th, 1876. Died Jan. 14th, 1895. She was married to Howard Hand, Dec. 24th, 1893. She leaves a husband and her father, three sisters, two brothers and host of friends to mourn her loss. She joined the Methodist Episcopal church at Marble Corner in 1892. During the revival meeting held at that place last October she was present a number of times and always testified to the love of Jesus. Until her health failed her she continued faithful and consistant christian when God took her from the church Militant to the church Triumphant. While enduring untold suffering at the last she was happy in a Savior's love and her death was one great victory. Her funeral took place at the Big Creek Church Jan. 16th 1895, and was conducted by her pastor, T.J. Tonne. Her body was interred near the church where the funeral was held, a large congregation being present. findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - SEPTEMBER 30, 1896
OBITUARY
    Died - At his home near Hege, on Thursday morning, Sept. 24th 1896, James Weedon Hammond, third son of Theopolis and Mary Hammond. He was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., Feb. 8th, 1875, making his age 21 years, 7 months and 16 days. He has been confined to his room with typhoid fever for two months causing heart trouble which resulted in his death. He leaves father, mother, grand-mother, five brothers and four sisters, besides a host of other relaives and friends to mourn his early demise. Weed was a gemeral favorite, not only in the home circle where he was best known but in the neighborhood he was universally loved and respected.
    He will be sadly missed by those who knew him best for he ever had a smile and pleasant word of greeting for one and all. Many are the expressions of endearment that came not only from the nearest relatives but from neighbors and a large circle of friends and acquaintances.
    The kind affectionate brother and son is gone.
    He was laid to rest on Friday afternoon in the Springer cemetery near Elizabethtown, followed by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends. Rev. David T. Newsome conducted the services at the grave.
    Weed is not dead but gone before. O.C. findagrave link
OBITUARY
    Mrs. L.D. Pennington, whose maiden name was Elizabeth A. Stone, was born Sept. 4, 1830, on the old Boner farm, about one mile south of the residence in which she died. Her girlhood days were passed in Vernon, at which place she was married on March 21, 1850, to Lorenzo D. Pennington by Elder Hickman New, after which they settled at Westport, Ind., and lived at that place until they moved to their present residence in April, 1865. She passed away at 6 o'clock a.m., Sept 18, 1896, after eight months of intense suffering. She leaves a husband and seven children-three sons and four daughters, and a host of friends to mourn their loss. A long time prior to her death she knew her disease was incurable, but her faith was placed in Him who can cure all pain and she trustingly awaited the coming of the Great Physician. Shortly before her death she called her family to her bedside and bade them good bye, requesting them to place their trust in the Lord. Then, suddenly raising her clasped hands, and looking toward heaven, exclaimed, "Into your hands I put my fate," and expired. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Horace Spears at the family residence and her remains were laid to rest in the Vernon Cemetery. findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - DECEMBER 6, 1899
Obituaries
    Evaline F. Wagner was born in Verno, Indiana, July 26, 1842, died December 1, 1899. She was very concientious in the performance of what she considered her duty and at the age of fifteen, began teaching to aid her mother in the maintenance of a family of small children, the father having died a year previous.
    Her success as a teacher was remarkable. About thirty years of her life was spent in teaching in the public schools of Vernon, Vincennes and Seymour: and the remaining years in the different Institutions of this and several other states. Even after the deamon of disease had laid fast hold on her, she could not quell her ambition, but toiled on regardless of pain and suffering, until she was compelled to surrender, about a year and a half ago, and give up all teaching.
    Eva possesed that quality of true friendship and well could it be said of her, "she would lay down her life for her friends."
    She united with the Universalist church early in life, and was devoted to the faith she loved so well. But she has been called to that bourne of final rest and we can only say,
    She leaves two brothers a sister and many relatives to mourn her death.
    The Rev. Edward Gilcrest conducted the services at the Baptist chruch, Sunday morning, Dec. 3, 1899. The remains were then interred in the Vernon cemetery.    E.W     Findagrave link

    Mary Wilson Wagner was born in Madison, Ind., March 4, 1824 and was married to Uriah Wagner, May 12, 1844, and came at once to Vernon and had continued to reside in this place until about two months ago when she went to Louisville, Ky., to make a home for her son Frank. Eight children were born to her, three of whom with her devoted husband have gone on before. Her whole married life was spent in Vernon, dearly loved by all who knew her. she was a tender, loving devoted wife and mother and none will miss her more than her children and grandchildren who were affectionally fond of her.
    The remains were brought here from Louisville, Ky., and the services were held in the Presbyterian church, Sunday afternoon, Dec. 8, 1899, conducted by Rev. Edward Gilcrist. Remains interred in the Vernon cemetery. Findagrave link
Poem for both women
Oh! weary eyes! that oft did weep,
Closed now; rest well in dreamless sleep.
Oh! tired hands! that did their best,
Lie still-be folded into rest.
Oh! feet! that trod life's stony road,
There's rest for you 'neath grassy sod.
Oh! fragile body! sad and worn,
Best, thee-oh rest thee from life's storm.
And thou, oh soul! that wingst thy flight,
From earth's dark prison into night.
Great gain, oh sould! be thine for aye-
From earth's dark night to endless day.

    Casper Henninger was born in Rheinfalz, Bavaria, May 4, 1804 and died Nov. 29, 1899, aged 95 years, 6 months and 25 days. He emigrated to this country with his wife and four children in 1853 and came direct to Vernon, Ind., where he has since resided. Two children survive him, Mrs. Elizabeth Fetter and Jacob Henninger. The wife and two of the children Catharine and Casper having departed this life some years back. He leaves twelve grand-children and four great grand children. The funeral services were conducted at the home of Michael Fetter, on Friday afternoon, Dec. 1, 1899, by Rev. Edward Gilcrist. Interred in the Vernon cemetery.

VERNON JOURNAL - JANUARY 11, 1898
Obituary
    John Van Riper was born in Pennyan County, Mass., in 1831. Soon after his birth his parents moved to the state of New York. When by three years of age his parents died and he went to live with the family of Nathan Evelith and at the age of seven came with them to Jennings county, Indiana. He knew no other mother than Mrs. Eveleth whom he ever fondly cherished. At the age of nineteen he removed to Illinois where he taught school for several years. Here he was married to Elizabeth Graham. In 1858 just before the beginning of the Kansas-Missouri trouble, he removed his family to S.E. Kansas; while there owing to his views on the slavery question he lost what property he had accumulated and was compelled for the safety of himself and family to remove to Allen Co., Kas. At the beginning of the war he joined CO. E. 9th Kansas Vol. Cav., serving until mustered out in 65. After the war he returned to his farm in Allen Co. Kas., where in 1867 his wife died. In 1871 he paid a visit to his old home in Ind., and while there met and married Nancy Hammond. In 1877 on account of failing health he removed his family to Hayden, Ind., where he resided until his death, Dec. 22, 1898. He was the father of eight children six of whom are now living and with his wife and stepson mourn his loss.
    He was ever an earnest consistent Christian and at the time of his death was an ordained deacon in the Baptist church and Superintendent of the Sabbath School. Findagrave Link OBITUARY
    Mrs. Eliza McIlroy, whose maiden name was Hammel, was born in Franklin County, Pa., Oct. 4th, 1817. She was married to George R. McIlroy 1840. In the year 1854 they removed from Pennsylvania to Oakdale, where the family continued to reside until after the death of Mr. McIlroy, which occurred nearly thrity years ago. Soon after his death the family removed to Mrs. McIlroy's late home near Vernon. Mr. and Mrs McIlroy united with the Vernon Presbyterian church-by letter, soon after coming into the State. A year later, Mr. McIlroy was elected Rulling Elder; which office he filled most faithfully until his death. Of the eight children given these parents, five survive-three sons and two daughters.
    A succession of calamities and bereavements followed the family to their new home in the West;-calamities so mysterious and so sad as to awaken the thought and the profound sympathy of the entire community. During one year (1855-56) in which nearly all the households were prostrated with fever and argue, Mr. McIlroy's mill blew up, and several persons were killed, among them, a brother,-a young man of fine promise who came with them from Pa., the oldest daughter sickened and died, a dear little boy followed, and baby Alice, the pet of the household, was instantly killed by the cars. (railroad)
    Mrs. Eliza McIlroy, the subject of this sketch, was a daily student of the Bible, as well as a tireless worker; and altho genial, sunny, and social, she seldom took time for recreation, or to enjoy the society of friends outside the limits of her own family circle. But her place in the Sanctuary was rarely vacant. Its holy services were he delight, and whenever able, from Sabbath to Sabbath she trod the long and weary way that led to God's house.
    Self-sacrificing in her devotion to home duties, patient and unpretending her cheerful face seemed to be constantly set toward the hills where there are no shadows.
    After an illness of several month's duration, she fell asleep on the evening of January 3, 1899, in the 82nd year of her age.
    An appropriate and beautiful funeral service was conducted by Rev. J. F. Baird, in the Presbyterian church, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Vernon cemetery. Findagrave link
What is life, with its hopes and fears?
What is life, with its toil and tears?
What is life, with its fourscore years?
Only a vanishing vapor yet:
Only a breath and a fond regret:
Only a gleam, and then-sunset
Only at tint,-a memory:
Only a barque on a boundless sea;
But frvighted with-Eternity.    M.A.I.
Deaths
    Joseph Smith, of Queensville died of heart failure on Wednesday. Buried at Vernon cemetery, on Friday. Findagrave Link
    Mrs. Harrison Spencer, died of pneumonia, after a very brief sickness, on Friday.
    Chas. Gahn, of Lovett, died of dropsy on Friday. Buried on Sunday. Findagrave Link
    Geo. Smith, a pioneer colored man, of Bigger township, died, Jan. 1st. He was a Kentucky slave, and came to this county at the close of the war.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - APRIL 15, 1891
Centerville
DIED-At his residence in Lovett township, one mile south of this place, on Friday night, April 9th, 1891, Mr. John Deal. He was born in the village of Nordheim, in the State of Hesse Dormstadt, near the city of Worms, on the river Rhine, Germany, Nov. 16th, 1813. He came to America in 1837, and settled in the State of Indiana. He was married to Mary Wolfe, Aug. 14, 1842. To them were born two sons. He was married the second time to Elizabeth Paffenburger. To them were born seven children, two of whom still survive him. He united with the M.E. Church at Centerville in 1847. He was a professed follower of Christ, and was always present at public worship as long as health permitted. He always served his Master, and while on the bed of affliction, he endured his suffering with Christian patience. He was afflicted four years. He always said he was ready to go, that he was just waiting for the Lord to call him home. Mr. Deal was a good citizen, a good neighbor, always ready to lend a helping hand, and a kind father and husband. Mrs. Deal and daughters have the sympathy of the entire community. Funeral services were held at the Centerville M.E. church, Sunday at 3 p.m., conducted by the German minister, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Centerville cemetery. Findagrave link
East Lovett  April 13, 1891
    Mrs. Polly Carson died at her home one mile east of Lovett, on Saturday morning, April 11th, 1891, at 6 o'clock, after a lingering illness of several months. Deceased was born in Jennings county, Indiana, in May, 1836, and at her death was nearing her 55th birthday. At an early period she united with the Presbyterian church. As an evident fact she was a consistent christian, a loving mother, a kind neighbor, and a friend to all who knew her. She was the wife of Lewis Carson, who for several years has gone before her. Their union was blessed with three children, all of whom survive her. To the bereaved sons, grand children and other relatives the community at large extends their most sincere sympathy. Funeral services were conducted by her Pastor, Rev. J. McRee, at the Graham Presbyterian church, after which the remains were carried to their last resting place in the cemetery. Findagrave link
OBITUARY
    Martha Bland was born in North Carolina in the year 1803, moved to the Territory of Indiana with her parents when a small girl. Both her parents dying, she came with a widowed sister to Jefferson county, Indiana, and was joined in marriage there to the Rev. Thomas Bland, in the 21st year of her age. From this union they raised a family of seven children-six sons and one daughter; four of them are now dead (all died over the age of 30 years). She was quite domestic in her habits, enjoying herself much better at her home in the care of her children than elsewhere. She lived a faithful member of the M. E. church, beloved by all her children, and neighbors. Died a Christian's peaceful death, March 24th, 1891, in the 88th year of her age, leaving a husband, three children and a number of grand children to mourn her lass, but not as those who mourn without hope. Findagrave Link

NORTH VERNON REPUBLICAN - NOVEMBER 26, 1908
Found Dead
    Lewis Carson of Vernon was found dead in bed yesterday morning at Tampico, in Jackson county. He was out on his route selling Poultry Tonic having left home several days since and while he was not in good health when he left, his condition was not considered alarming. Heart failure is supposed to have been the cause of his death. He leaves a wife and four children.
DIED-Wm. J. Randall, for many years a prominent farmer of this county, died at his home in Vernon township on Sunday. For the past four years he has been an invalid as the result of a stroke of partial paralysis and for more than a year he has been almost entirely helpless, requiring the constant attendance of a nurse. During the active period of his life hewas active is Farmers Institute work and was a most successful farmer. He was a member of the G.A.R. Post and of the I.O.O.F. A wife and four sons survive him.
    Funeral services were held at the residence on Monday and his remains were taken to Dillsboro for burial on Tuesday.
DIED-George W. Graston, 74 years of age, of Dupont, died at his home there Monday night. For many years Mr. Graston was employed in the Mill business in this county, having operated the mill at Paris and at Vernon, but several years ago he bought the mill at Dupont, which he operated until the time of his death and which he was eminently successful, having accumulated a vast amount of property. Findagrave link
DIED-James Couchman, 54 yearsof age, and a former resident of this county, died at his home in Louisville, Monday. He had lived in Louisville, for 20 years and had a successful business career there. Findagrave link

VERNON JOURNAL - MARCH 29, 1899
Obituary
    Dailey J. Faker-infant son of Charles and Addie Faker, died in Lovett township, March 23, 1899, age 18 months, and 15 days. Services conducted by W.T. Wilson, on Thursday, after which the remains were interred in the Graham cemetery.
Obituary
    John W Morris was born near Salem, Ohio, June 1st, 1829. On June 3rd, 1847 he was married to Mary Kerkbride and to them was given 5 children of which all precede him. In 1852 he and his first wife came to Jennings county, where he spent the remainder of his life which was 47 years. Mary K. Morris died July 24th, 1858. He saw fit to chose another companion Rebecca T. Morrogh (Stanley) on Oct. 13th, 1859, to them was given 4 children, all of which survive him. Rebecca T. Morris fell asleep in Jesus, Jan. 3rd, 1876. In the providence of God he saw fit to chose another companion Mary N. Barber, Feb. 1st, 1877 to them was given one child which preceded him, leaving the latter companion surviving him. On March 16th 1899, he quietly fell asleep in Jesus. He bore his last illness with all patience, expressing a willingness to go, at the age of 72 years, 9 months, 16 days. Findagrage link
    Mrs. Mary J. Crist, of Grayford 76 years old and for 53 years a resident of this county, died on Friday, of Pneumonia and after funeral services conducted by Rev. Grimes, on Saturday, her remains were interred in the Vernon cemetery. findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - SEPTEMBER 14, 1876
Died-Solomon Deputy died of conjestive chill at his residence in Marion township on last Thursday, and was burried in Mr. Zion cemetary on the following Saturday at 11 o'clock p.m. Findagrave link
Died-Alexander Liddle died of consumption at his home in Marion township on Wednesday of last week, and was burried in Mr. Zion cemetary on last Friday. Findagrave link
Died-Mrs. J. Keiper, of Marion township, died on Monday of last week and was burried in Mr. Zion cemetery on Tuesday.

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - JANUARY 8, 1904
Obituary
    Riley Elliott, or Uncle Riley as he was familiarly known and called by his neighbors and friends, was born near Lawrenceburg, Dearborn County, Indiana, December 24, 1821, and at the time of his death, December 19, 1903, was 81 years, 11 months and 25 days old. In early life Mr. Elliott united with the Baptist church but in his old age he ceased to be an active member although he remained faithful to his religon and remained a firm believer in the refining influence of the church and the power of a living God as his savior. At the age of 22 he married Hannah Daily, of Hardinburg, now Hayden, with he lived happily until she was called to that immortal home where parting is no more. By this union there was born one child, who survives her father and is the widow of Calvin Wildey. After the death of his first companion he married Henrietta Goould. By reason of this union there were born ten children, four of whom died in infancy and three after they were grown. Mr. Elliott came to North Vernon when it was a small town and from the time he located here to the time of his death, he took a great interest in the growth and future prosperity of the city. He was elected, after the town was incorporated as a city, a member of the common council from his home ward, the 3rd, and no member from that or any other ward in this city was more loyal or zealous than he when the interest of his ward was before the council. In his public and private life he was universally kind and considerate as well as affable to those who came in contact with him. The city has lost by the death of Mr. Elliott, one of its oldest citizens, one who was proud of its growth, and who in its early history took an active part in bringing about the conditions that all citizens of the city feel a just pride andin its present prosperous condition and future prospects of permanency. His widow has lost a kind husband and his surviving children a loving indulgent father, and they have the proud satisfaction and consoling knowledge that while he lived beyond the allotted time of man, that he left to them an inheritance more to be sought after than the precious metals-a good name. Such a monument is more enduring than one erected from stone, brass and mortar, for they will crumble and fade away, but a good name will live on and on and be honored as long as time lasts. Burial - Hillcrest Cemetery
Over the Rhine Column
    Jacob Artz died Sunday morning. Burial at the German graveyard today-Tuesday. For a few years Mr. Artz had been ailing and his death was not altogether unexpected. Findagrave link
Obituary
    Robert W. Branham was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., January 11, 1823, died at his home near Zion church, in Jennings county, Dec. 11, 1903, aged 80 years and 11 months. He was united in marriage to Elizabeth Spencer, Aug. 6, 1846. To this union were born nine children. Two sons and three daughters survive him, four sons having died in early youth. His wife preceeded him to that better land three years ago. He united with the Baptist church in early life and remained a consistent member until the Master called, "Come HOme". The remains were laid to rest in the Vernon cemetery. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - FEBRUARY 21, 1904
    Mrs. James H. Abbott died at her home here on Saturday morning, February 6th, 1904, at 3 o'clock, of paralysis. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Grimes, at the family residence on Monday afternoon, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Vernon Cemetery. Findagrave link
    George W. Vandergrift, died at the home of his daughter (Mrs. Norris,) in Troy, Ohio, on Monday, February 8, 1904. His remains were brought to Vernon on Thursday morning and interred in Vernon Cemetery. Mr. Vandergrift lived near Vernon for many years, and was well known and highly respected and his many friends here were sorry to learn of his death. He was in the 74th year of his age. Findagrave link
Resolution of Condolence
    Upon the death of Mrs. Amanda Clarkson, a member of the Freedom Sunday School, whom God in allwise providence, has seen fit to call from our midst. She departed this life January 29, 1904, aged forty-five years. She spent the most of these in the service of her Savior, having united with the Methodist church at the age of fourteen. Resolved, that we feel, keenly, the loss which we have sustained as members of her class in Sunday School. Her example was always noble and she was well worthy of the esteem of all who knew her and we, as a class, shall ever cherish her in our memory and strive to fulfill her request, to prepare meet her in heaven. We extend to the loving father and daughters our deepest sympathy in the sad affliction that has come upon them. Resolved that a copy of these resolutions be published in the county papers and copy sent to the family, and a report be made upon our Sunday School records.
Harriett Stillman
Grace Ryan
Daisy James
    Maggie Shera died at the home of her parents, a half mile north of Alert, Wednesday. Rev. Vogel, of Hartsville, preached the funeral sermon at Bear Creek, Saturday, to a very large and sympathising audience after which the remains were laid to rest in the Bear Creek cemetery. Maggie's was the first death that has occurred in the Shera Family. She was the oldest daughter. She leaves a father and mother, three sisters and three brothers, and a host of relatives and friends, to mourn her loss. We join with the many friends of the family our sincere sympathy. Findagrave link
    Gus Herring died at his home in Alert, Thursday night. Rev. Talkington, of Grammar, preached the funeral sermon at Bear Creek church Sunday to a crowded house of sympathising relatives and friends. Gus was one of our old settlers. He never joined any church but a few days before he died, he requested to be baptized and have his name put on the church book, at Bear Creek Baptist church. Rev. Talkington, of Grammer, administered the ordinance of baptism to him. Gus was a cousin of the writer and we join the other relatives and friends in sympathy to the bereaved family. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn the loss of a loving husband and father.

NORTH VERNON SUN - JANUARY 27, 1892
Died, Jan. 23, 1892, of consumption. Alice, wife of Jackson Vance. Deceased leaves a husband and one daughter to mourn her loss. Interment took place to-day, Monday, at the Tea Creek cemetery at 11 o'clock. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - JANUARY 18, 1934
DANIEL VANCE, 87 years of age, died of the infirmities of old age at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Dempster Green, Friday, Jan. 12th.     Mr. Vance was born in Jennings county where he spent the greater part of his life. He was an honest upright citizen and had made many friends during his lifetime.
    He is survived by four sons, Granville and Webb of near Cropsey, Ill., J.E. Vance and J.A. Vance of Lovett and by a large number of grandchildren and several great granchildren.
    Funeral services were held Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at the Tea Creek church with burial in the Tea Creek cemetery. Rev Swarthout of Butlerville conducted the services. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - SEPTEMBER 4, 1941
Mrs. Sarah Vance, 68 years old, died Wednesday after a heart attack in the Pennsylvania Railroad Station in Franklin, Ind. She was the widow of Thomas Vance who was a former employee of the Pennsylvania Railroad.
    Mrs. Vance and her daughter, Miss Gladys Vance, who is a teacher in the Franklin schools, were waiting for a train to take them to Mrs. Vance's sister, Mrs. George Rich of Corydon.
    Another son Mr. Roland Vance of this city survives.
    Funeral arrangements had not been completed as we do to press.
    Surviving are the husband, two sons, Roland of this city, and Wm. of Cincinnati, O.; two daughters, Miss Gladys of Franklin, and Mrs. George Rich, of Corydon.
    The remains will be brought to this city Friday morning and held at the Diekhoff Funeral Home, when services will be held at the First Baptist church Saturday morning, at 10:30 with burial in the Hillcrest cemetery. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - AUGUST 14, 1919
PIONEER MERCHANT PASSES AWAY
WOLF GUMBLE SUCCUMBS AFTER TWO WEEKS OF ILLNESS
Was Prominent in Business For Fifty-One Years.
    Wolf Gumble, prominent citizen and business man died at the home of his son, Mose Gumble, on Walnut Street, at about 4:30 o'clock. Tuesday afternoon August 12th, after an illness of two weeks. The body was taken to Cincinnati, Thursday morning, where funeral services were held at Walnut Hills Chapel at 2:30 o'clock in the in the afternoon and the burial took place in Walnut Hills Cemetery.
    Wolf Gumble was born in Heidelburg, Germany, March 26th, 1830. At the age of twenty-six, he came to America and his first stop in the United States was in Ohio. After living there a short time, he came to North Vernon in the year 1868 and at that time started in business in this city, laying the foundation of the business, which has flourished for fifty-one years. Although for many years the business has been managed by his son, Mose Gumble who is the junior member of the firm "Grandpa Gumble" as he was knownto all his clerks, had been almost constantly at the store and despite his eighty-three years had always shown an active interest in business proceedings and in the pleasures and daily life of young people who were in his employe.
    About the year 1870, he was united in marriage to Bertha Katz, of Cincinnati, and to this marriage three children were born, two are left to mourn his death: his son Mose Gumble of this city, and his daughter, Mrs. Hannah Arky of St. Louis. He was bereaved of his wife on May 23rd, 1906 and his other daughter, Lena, passed away on May 4, 1912. One grandson, Stanley Gumble, of this city, survives.

Mrs George Litchfield Died Suddenly Tuesday
    Mrs. George Litchfield, aged forty-three, died at her home on South State Street, this city, at about 3:30 o'clock. Tuesday afternoon, August 12th. He death came as a crushing blow to her husband and little daughter, who had left her but a short while before in good health and good spirits.
    Mrs. Litchfield was at work in the kitchen at her home when she was stricken. A workman, who was working on the lawn, stepped into the kitchen for something and found her lying on the floor, critically ill. Mr. Litchfield who was at his office, was summoned by telephone and a physician also was called, but their efforts to save her were fruitless and she died a few minutes later.
    Mrs. Litchfield was a highly esteemed woman, a devoted wife, mother, daughter and sister, a faithful church worker and a useful woman in the community. Her bereaved husband and little daughter and her aged mother, who made her home with her, have the sympathy of the community in the loss of one who was so devoted to their comfort and happiness. Besides her husband and little daughter, Mary, and her mother, Mrs. Mary Rubottom, she is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Kate Walker, of Havanna, North Dakota, and Mrs. Blanch Wagner, of Peoria, Ill. and by two brothers. Charles Rubottom, of Indianapolis, and Clyde Rubottom, of Decatur, Alabama.
    The funeral service will be held at the residence at two o'clock Saturday afternoon, conducted by Rev. C.H. Pinnick, of the First M.E. Church, of which church the deceased was a member. The burial will take place in the City Cemetery. Findagravelink

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - OCTOBER 21, 1943
MRS. SUSAN C. GANT CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs Susan Catherine Gant, ninety years old, died Monday, October 18th, at the home of son Lewis V. Gant in the Bear Creek community. The body was taken to the Jordan furneral home at Vernon and funeral services were held this morning (Thursday at Bear Creek Church. Burial took place in Bear Creek Cemetery.
    Mrs. Gant was the daughter of George and Mary Gividen and spent most of her life in Jennings County. Her home, in the northern part of the county, was near that of her son and when she became ill two weeks ago she went to her son's home and was cared for there by her children who came to her bedside. She is survived by three daughters: Mrs. Anna McGuire of Jennings County; Mrs. Iva Tomlinson of Wabash; and Mrs. Grace Clerkin, of North Vernon; and one son Lewis V. Gant of Decatur, County. She is also survived by four grandchildren and eleven great grandchildren. Her husband Monroe Gant, preceded her in death. Findagrave link
JOSEPH DORGAY DIES IN MICHIGAN
    Joseph Dorgay, seventy-four years old died Thursday, October 18 at a nursing home in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. The body was brought to the Down funeral home in this city and funeral services were held at St. Mary Cemetery.
    He formerly lived in this city but went to Michigan in July to be near his daughter, who is a nun. when he became ill he was taken to the Bloomfield Hills Nursing Home which is conducted by the Sisters of the Order of Devine Charity, of which his daughter had been a member for twenty years. All of his children visited him during his illness.
    His wife died in this city in the year 1941. He is survived by six children; Joseph and Andrew Dorgay, of Milwaukee, Wis.; Mrs. Marie Feltes, of Sulphur, La.,; Sister Carmella, of South Bend; Mrs. Isabelle Deck, of South Gate, Calif; and Sergeant Paul Dorgay, of Camp Howze, Texas. A brother, Andrew Dorgay, of Granite City, Ill., also survives. Findagrave link
MRS. DANA F. JACUPS CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs. Dana Frances Jacups, sixty years old, died Saturday, October 16th at he home of her daughter, Mrs. Edna Hyder on Route 2, North Vernon. The body was brought to the Dowd funeral parlor and was taken to Bowling Green, Ky., where funeral services were held and the burial took place. Findagrave link
ALONZO HARRELL EXPIRES SUDDENLY
    Alonzo Harrell, seventy-nine years old, of this city, died suddenly at the home of his step daughter, Mrs. Raymond Sandefur, Saturday morning on October 17th, in Brownstown. The body was taken to the Voss Funeral home at Seymour and was brought to this city, Sunday, for services at the Church of the Nazarene, conducted by the Rev. A.R. Ketterman. The burial took place in Riverview Cemetery in Seymour.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harrell went to the Sandefur home for a visit. Although he had suffered some heart trouble, he was in usual health and spirits when he awoke Saturday morning. He ate breakfast and accompanied Mrs. Sandefur to the barn lot where she fed some livestock. As they walked back to the house, he collapsed and died instantly.
    He is survived by the widow and by one son by a former marriage, Charles Harrell, of the Four Corners community; also by three step-daughters, Mrs. Sandefur, Mrs. O.M. Losey of this city; and Mrs. Elizabeth Fry, of Vernon; and two step-sons, Frank Jackson,of St. Louis, Mo., and Albert Jackson, of Rushville.
    He was a member of the Church of the Nazarene, of this city. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - December 9, 1943
JOHN FIRZGERALD DIES IN INDIANAPOLIS
    John Fitzgerald, 82 years old, of this city died at Indianapolis, Thursday, December 2nd. The body was brought here and funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic Church at 9:30 o'clock by Rev. Omer Eisenman. Burial took place in St. Mary's Cemetery.
    He spent most of his life on a farm in Jennings County but moved to North Vernon after his farm was taken as a part of the Government Proving Ground. He was visiting in Indianapolis when he became ill and passed away. He is survived by four daughters and one son: Mrs. Florence Cornelius, Mrs. Mary Hawley, Mrs. M. Chester and Mrs. Thelma Rozell and Alvin Fitzgerald. Findagrave link
BABY CALLED BY DEATH
    Charlotte Harlow, the two-day old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Harlow of Butlerville, died at Schneck Memorial Hospital at Seymour, Wednesday, December 8th. The body was brought to the Dowd funeral home. Burial arrangements have not been completed.
MISS REBECCA HEIDT ANSWERS SUMMONS
    Miss Rebecca Heidt, seventy-nine years old, died Sunday, December 4th, at the Madison State Hospital where she had been a patient for twelve years. The body was taken to the Jordan Funeral home at Vernon. Funeral services were hald at Rush Branch, Tuesday afternoon conducted by the Rev. Tullis, and burial took place in the chruch cemetery.
    She was born and reared in Bigger Township and spent most of her life there. She is survived by one nephew, Elmer Bundy, of Bigger Township; and three nieces, Miss Alice Bundy,of Ashville, N.C., Mrs. Iva Lowry and Mrs. Ray Long of Indianapolis. Findagrave link
MRS. LOTTIE WAGNER CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs. Lottie Dodd Wagner, eighty years old, died at the home of her (step) son, Eldo Dodd, at Paris Crossing, Friday, December 3rd. Funeral services were held at two o'clock Sunday afternoon at the Baptist Church in Paris Crossing conducted by the Rev. Roy Durse, pastor of the church. Burial took place in Coffee Creek Baptist Cemetery.
    She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Yeager and was born at Madison. Most of her life was spent in the Paris Crossing community. She is survived by one son, Eldo, of Paris Crossing, and one daughter Mrs. Julia Blades, of Berkeley, California; also by seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren and a great-nephew and great niece Mrs. Iva Tyner and Charles Merriman of Westport. Findagrave link
MRS. MARY LEE CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs. Mary Lee, sisty-nine years old, died at Madison State Hospital, Wednesday, December 8th. The body was brought to the Diekhoff funeral home and funeral services will be held Friday morning at nine o'clock at St. Mary Catholic Church. Burial will take place in St. Mary Cemetery. She is survived by several grandchildren. Findagrave link
MRS. CHARLES ENGEL CALLED BY DEATH
    Mrs. Anna Engel, sixty-seven years old, wife of Charles Engel, died at her home near Commiskey, Saturday, December 4th. Funeral services were held at the Baptist Church at Commiskey, Monday afternoon conducted by the Rev. Walter Moseley. Burial took place in Hopewell Cemetery, near Commiskey.
    She was the daughter of John and Ella Dawson and was born December 5, 1875, in Kentucky. WHen she was just a child, the family moved to Jennings County, and she spent almost all her life here. On February 20, 1895 she was united in marriage to Charles Engel and to this union were born four children. Of these children, Lewis E. died in infancy and Lillie Mae was taken at the age of six.
    She is survived by the husband one son, George Engel of Seymour, and one daughter, Mrs. Mamie Layman, of Commiskey. She also is survived by three brothers, John Dawson, of North Vernon; Frank Dawson, of Bloomington, Illinois; and Walter Dawson, of Franklin; two sisters, Mrs. Pearl Humphrey of Paris Crossing; and Mrs. Agnes Hartwell of New Castle; and two grand-daughters, Anna Mae Laymanof Commiskey; and Mrs. Marjorie Engel Fullmer, of Indianapolis.     Almost all of her married life was spent on a farm near Commiskey. For many years whe was an active member of the Commiskey Baptist Church. She had been in ill health for several years but the last illness came with sudden and unexpected violence and she did not linger long.
    She was devoted to her home and family and was held in high esteem by her many friends and neighbors. Findagrave link
NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - December 16, 1943
THOMAS ROSE SUFFERS DEATH WHILE HUNTING
Frozen Body Found Near River After Search of Forty Four Hours
    Thomas Rose, forty-five years old, a farmer of Marion Township, died of a heart attack while hunting ducks, Monday afternoon, in the vicinity of his home. His body was found late Wednesday morning after members of the family, neighbors and friends had searched for approximately fourty-four hours. The body was taken to the Eldo Dodd funeral home at Paris Crossing, where funeral services will be held Friday afternoon, conducted by the Rev. Walter Mosely.
    The man purchased shells at the Lurton store in Commiskey Saturday, saying that he was going duck hunting. He complained to one of the clerks at the store that he had not been feeling well. He left his home about three o'clock Monday afternoon and when he did not return before dark members of the family became alarmed and a search was started. The search continued through the night and Tuesday night.
    Late Wednesday morning, Charlie Dart, a neighbor, found the body on the Grant Stewart farm, near Big Creek. The body was frozen but there was no trace of wound or injury. Coroner Fletcher Dowd pronounced death due to an acute heart attack. It is said that the man had been suffering from heart trouble. After the body was found it was learned that members of the searching party had previously been within forty or fifty feet of where the man lay.
    Mr. Rose was engaged in farming on the Arbuckle farm. He worked on the farm during the week but he also served as minister for the Church of God, a small rural church, located between Deputy and Dupont. He preached at this church each Sunday. He is survived by the widow and two children, Arlie Rose of austin, and Mrs. Otto Malcomb, of Jennings County, and one grand-daughter. Findagrave link
CHARLES CHILDERS DIES AT CINCINNATI
    Charles Childers, a veteran Baltimore and Ohio train conductor, died suddenly at his home in Cincinnati and burial took place there.
    He is survived by the widow and three children, also by one sister and a brother, also a conductor on the Baltimore and Ohio. He lived for many years in Seymour and was well known here.
MRS. SARAH SMEDLER DIES AT TERRE HAUTE
    Mrs. Sarah Smedler, eighty-four years old, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Ella Carty, at Terre Haute, Monday, December 13th. Funeral services will be held today (Thursday) at Terre Haute and burial will take place there.
    She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. August Klingner and lived her early life in Jennings County. She was married to John Smedler and their married life was spent at Fountanet. Her husband preceded her in death. Eighteen years ago she came back to Jennings County to care for her sister Mrs. Mary Euler and remained with her until her death on January 22, 1943. Since that time she had been living at her daughter's home.
    She is survived by two sons, Tom and Albert Smedler, of Fountanet, and three daughters, Mrs. Ella Carty and Mrs. Edna Carty, of Terre Haute, and Mrs. Mary Wirt, of Los Angeles, California. Elmer Calvert and Ernest Klingner, of this city, are nephews. Findagrave link
MRS. FLOYD MCCREY DIED TUESDAY
    Mrs. Linnie Bell McCrey, fifty-six years old, wife of Floyd McCrey, died at her home near Nebraska, Tuesday, December 14th. The body was taken to the Dowd funeral home and funeral services were held this (Thursday) morning, at Butlerville Baptist Church. Burial took place in Butlerville Cemetery. Besides the husband she is survived by several children. Two sons are in the service of their country.
HENRY BELL WOOLLS sixty three years old, died at his home west of the city Thursday night December 9th, after a short illness. Funeral services were conducted at the Tower Funeral home at Seymour, Saturday afternoon with the Rev. Clyde S. Black. pastor of Trinity Methodist Church of Seymour, in charge. Burial took place in Riverview Cemetery in Seymour.
    He was the son of William H. and Agnes Grey Woolls and was born in Washington, D.C., February 17, 1880. He went to Seymour to live when quite young and had been a resident of North Vernon for a number of years. He was train conductor on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at the time of his death and had been in the service of the railroad for about forty years. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge in this city, of the Red Men's Lodge of Seymour and of the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.
    On April 5, 1923, he was married to Miss Naomi Fisher, who survives and he is also survived by two sons, Clarence Woolls and Athos Woolls, of Seymour and three grandchildren. Findagrave link
MRS. MORTON REEVES PASSED AWAY TUESDAY
    Mrs. Ruth Cobbs Reeves, seventy years old, died Tuesday, December 14th, at Madison State Hospital where she had been receiving treatment for two weeks. The body was taken to Voss funeral home at Seymour and funeral services will be held this (Thursday) afternoon at Hayden Methodist Church and burial will take place in Hayden Cemetery.
    She taught school when quite young and later took up the profession of nursing and was graduated from Sibley Hospital at Washington D.C. She served as a Methodist deaconess for a period of time and also as nurse at the Home for the Deaf at Indianapolis. She also practiced her profession as private nurse and served for a time as emergency county nurse for Jennings County.
    She married Morton Reeves, who died three years ago. Since his death she had been engaged as private duty nurse at Seymour but suffered a nervous breakdown and was taken to Schneck Memorial Hospital for treatment. On November 28th she was removed to Madison State Hospital, where her death occurred.
    She is survived by one brother, Oliver Cobb, a veteran of World War No. 1 who resides in Florida. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - March 1, 1905
Died
    Mrs. Louis Wildey, of near Hyde, died Sunday morning of pneumonia; aged about 45 years. The funeral was held Tuesday. Interment at Rush Branch. M. Wildey and little daughter also have the pneumonia and are in a dangerous condition.
    Michael Maschino for a number of years a resident of Spencer township living on six mile about three miles south of Hayden died at Seymour his late residence last Thursday morning. The remains were laid to rest in the new cemetery near the city last Saturday morning. Findagrave link
    William Gray, aged 52, living in the Deer creek neighborhood, died last Monday morning. His funeral and burial were under the direction of Rev. Duncan, of this city. Burial in the Summerfield cemetery.
    Geneva Township Loses One of Her Oldest and Most Highly Respected Citizens on Wednesday night March 1, 1905, when Wm. T. Rowe passed away. He was a time honored citizen and a large number of friends attended his funeral at Scipio in the Presbyterian church Friday. Rev. Cupp, of Alert, and Rev. D.L. Vanderment, of Greencastle, Ind., were in charge of the funeral and burial services.
    Wm. T. Rowe was born in New Jersey May 30th, 1818. He moved to Redding, Ohio, and while yet a young man to up a residence in Franklin county, Ind. He was married to Miss Mary Berry, of Brookville. To them were born two children, a boy and a girl. The daughter is Mrs. Phoebe Long, of Geneva township, and the son W.A. Rowe, lives only a short way from the old homestead.
    In the spring of 1852 Mr. and Mrs. Rowe moved to Geneva township and the same farm has been their home ever since. Mrs. Rowe died May 8, 1869.
    Wm. T. Rowe was a public spirited man and ready at all times to assist in any enterprise concerning the people at large.
    It was largely due to his influence and money that "The Sun" was moved to North Vernon from Seymour and started over thirty years ago.

NORTH VERNON SUN - March 17, 1905
Died
    Martin Hood (colored) aged 75 years, died at his home in this city last Sunday night. The remains were buried Monday afternoon.     ELSNER-Mrs. August Elsner aged 57 years, died at her home two miless east of Seymour Saturday morning of paralysis. Mrs. Elsner's death comes as a shock to her many friends, as she has been ill but a short time and such an abrupt termination of her illness was wholly unexpected. Deceased was well known here. She was born in Jackson county, August 2, 1847 and has resided in this vicinity ever since. She leaves a husband and four sons.
    The funeral was held at St. Paul's church at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Rev. Egli conducting services. Burial at St. Paul's cemetery. Findagrave link
From Paris Crossing Correspondent
    James H. Wilson, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of this place, died at his home last Thursday, aged 73 years. The funeral was conducted by Rev. Ward at the Coffee Creek Christian church. Findagrave link
George Euler Dead
    George Euler was born in Prussia, Province of Wetzler, Germany, March 30, 1840, and departed this life on the morning of March 11, 1905, at nine o'clock. He came to this country in 1858 in company with his mother, five sisters and a brother, landing at New York coming direct to Indianapolis, Indiana. In 1862 he came to Jennings county in which he resided until his death. Soon after coming to Jennings county he, with his brother, became engaged in the shoe business and took up farming in which industry he had continued until his death. He was united in marriage to Miss Minnie Marbour on Feb. 4, 1864, and to this union were born two sons and six daughters.
    He was a member of the Vernon Presbyterian church for many years and was a faithful member.
    He leaves a wife, son, six daughters, brother and three sisters, besides a host of other relatives and friends.
    The funeral services were conducted at the home on Graham, Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock by Rev. A.G. Yount of the Presbyterian church after which the remains were laid to rest in the Vernon cemetery. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - March 23, 1905
Obituary
    Eliza J. Weeks, nee Clinton, was born June 30, 1835, and died March 17, 1905, aged 69 years, 8 months and 17 days. She was born one and one half miles south of where Butlerville now stands and was the only child. She was married to Harvey R. Weeks August 3, 1853 and four children were born to them. The first died in infancy and Flora Ellen Kinnick, nee Weeks, died after 13 years of married life, leaving a boy and a girl. The girl has since died. Maggie Coy, nee Weeks, whose husband is now dead, has one child, and Mary B Hole, nee Weeks, has one child. All of these three children, who reached maturity were well educated, two of them being graduates of Moores Hill College and the other one attended as long as health would permit. Mrs. Weeks formerly lived at Vernon, on a farm but the last twenty years, she was a resident of this city. She joined the M.E. church in early childhood in the Brougher neighborhood, near Butlerville and has since belonged at Vernon and in this city. She with her husband helped to build the Butlerville church and were the largest individual contributors to the building fund of the First M.E. church of North Vernon. Their subscriptions were made each one paying one half from their respective possessions. She had been an invalid for the past 13 years and had not been able to leave her bed for 3 years past, she was consequently a great sufferer. Funeral services were conducted at the First M.E. church, Sunday, March 19, 10:30 a.m. by the pastor, C.C. Bonnell. Burial at Vernon. Findagrave link

NORTH VERNON SUN - March 24, 1905
Deaths     Mrs. Anthony Ginley died on St. Patrick's day and her funeral and burial was conducted Sunday afternoon by Rev. Father Widerin from St. Mary's church. The remains were placed to rest in St. Mary's cemetery.
    Mary Caffrey was born in Ireland in 1820. She married Anthony Ginley before coming to America. In 1847 the family landed in New Orleans. Later Madison was their home and finally Jennings county, where she remained until her death.
    The children wish to thank the friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted them during the sickness and burial of their mother, Mrs. Ginley. This family name was originally McGinley. Findagrave link
_________
    Daniel McGinty died at his home in this city last Friday. Some time ago when the ground was covered with ice he fell while going home over the bridge near Hick's machine shop, and received injuries from which he never recovered.
    Mr. McGinty is a member of one of the oldest and best known families of the city. He was a B. & O. S-W section foreman. His funeral and burial was conducted by Father Widerin from St. Mary's church.
_________
    Mrs. Roda Eveleth, aged 92, died at the home of her son, George, who lives three miles north of Hayden, last Sunday morning. She was the living representative of five generations and had a host of relatives who loved their good old grandmother. Mrs. Eveleth came to the farm where she died in 1838 and lived there ever since. Rev. Duncan, of this city, conducted the funeral last Monday afternoon. The remains were interred in the Mutton creek cemetery.
_________
    Died, Sunday morning at 7 o'clock Mrs. Rose Kane, wife of Patrick Kane. Mrs. Kane's maiden name was Rose Clerkin. She was the daughter of Wm. Clerkin and Mary Clerkin of Campbell township, and was born near Butlerville April 26, 1863, and was married to Patrick Kane in 1886. To them were born four children three of whom are still living. The funeral was conducted at the Catholic church in North Vernon, and the remains laid to rest in St. Mary's cemetery. NORTH VERNON PLAIN DEALER - January 13, 1892
OBITUARY
    Eliza Shephard was born at Rome, New York, Feb. 23rd, 1808, and died at the residence of her son-in-law, L.H. Hill, Dec. 27th, 1891. She was married to Ephraim McMillan, at Rome, in June, 1825. amd was left a widow, Sept. 20th, 1857. When 17 years old she united with the Presbyterian church under the preaching of Rev. Chas. J. Finney and continued a member of that church until moving to Gowanda, N.Y. It being more convenient, she placed her membership in the M.E. church, in which she remained until her death. She had eight children, one of whom preceded her to the better land. Mrs. ____ina Dye, who died at Spring City, Tennessee, April 20th, 1886. There are left, Mrs. Mary Richardson, J.B. McMillan, Mrs. Sarah Hodshire and Mrs. Adelia Hill, of this place; E.E. McMillan, Ludlow, Ky.; Mrs. Jane Shaw, Dayton, N.Y., and Mrs. Maria Prather, Kirbeyville, Mo., to mourn a loss which can never be restored. Mrs. McMillan was a woman with a very cheerful and sunny nature, always greeting everyone with a kind word and pleasant smile. Her presence was felt to be a blessing and benediction upon the household where she passed many of the last years of her life. Her mind was remarkably clear for one of her years and she enjoyed living, but was willing "to depart and be with Christ."
    These lines were found marked in one of her scrap books:
Some Day,
A flower, a song, a word may be
A link between us strong and sweet;
Ah, then dear child remember me;
And let your heart to "mother" beat,
My love is with you everywhere-
You cannot get beyond my prayer.

Some Day,
At longest it cannot be long,
I shall with glad impatience wait,
Amid the glory and the song,
For you before the Golden Gate,
After earth's parting and earth's pain
Never to part! Never again.
Findagrave link

Franklin Evening Star - February 2, 1920 - pg. 1 (Thank You Lois Johnson for this Obit)
Ethel Wohrer Carlock
Born 1892
Died 1920 in Washington, D.C.

Death of Mrs. R. H. Carlock
     Mrs. William Featherngill received a message this morning announcing the death in Washington, D. C. of her sister, Mrs. R. H. Carlock, after an illness of a few days from influenza. Mrs. Carlock, who formerly was Ethel Wohrer, was well known in Franklin, where she lived for a few years while attending the Franklin high school. She graduated from the local school in 1911 and after teaching for three years entered Indiana university, where she graduated in 1917, completing her university course in three years.
     During the war she and her husband entered the government service where they had remained for several months, her husband just recently having retired from the government work. In addition to the husband, she is survived by a young daughter.
    Mrs. Carlock was a brilliant you woman and was loved by all who knew her. During her stay in Franklin she gained a host of friends to whom news of her death will be received with great sorrow. Her record while a student in the Franklin high school was a splendid one and she graduated with high honors.
    The funeral party will arrive in Seymour Wednesday noon and the body will be taken from there to the Wohrer home near Hayden, where services will be held Thursday morning. Burial will be in the family cemetery at Hayden.
     Mrs. Featherngill left shortly after noon today for Hayden, where she will remain until after the funeral. Findagrave link

North Vernon Sun - June 2, 1921
Obituary
    Charity Meek was born March 8, 1830, on a farm near the present home of her son Edward Kinder. She was married to Peter Kinder November 10, 1853, who was born near the same place and who passed away December 19th, 1904.
    They began housekeeping on the exact spot of her death which place was the scene of their continoous residence.
    To this union was born ten sons and four daughters, six of whom have preceded her in death. She being survived by five sons and three daughters, twenty-seven grand children; twenty-four great grandchildren and four great, great, grandchildren.
    Her life spanning a period of 91 years, 2 months and 15 days was a stenious one, being a struggle with the problems of early settlers of this county and the rearing of a large family without the aid of mondern conveniences.
    She had been a member of the Tea Creek Baptist Church for more than 45 years, was a great lover of the Bible and read and re-read the story of the love of God for his children, and the prayer for their guidance, making them the basis of a character that is worthy of emulation by every one, and is revered by all relations and friends.
    As a wife, she was true and faithful, as a mother tireless, kind and loving, as a friend and neighbor, dependable, honest, truthful, unknown to malice, envy or hate. A curb in time of triumph and an encouragement in time of failure, whose going is at once beacon and a benediction.
CARD OF THANKS
    We desire to express our appreciation and thanks to our many friends and relatives for the kindness and sympathy shown us during the illness and death of our beloved mother Charity Kinder.
    Also to the pastor, the undertaker those who took part in the music and to the friends for their beautiful floral offerings. The Family Findagrave link

Vernon Journal - December 14, 1898
Obituary
    Phineas B. Bailiff was born in Clermont Co., Ohio, July 30, 1824, died Dec. 6th, 1898, aged 74 years, 4 months, 6 days. His remains were intered in the Centerville cemetery on Dec. 8th, 1896.
    When fourteen years of age he came to Indiana with his parents locating on Tea Creek about three miles west of Lovett where, with the exception of a residence of about two years in Jefferson county, he has since resided. Having lived the last forty years on his farm which he wrought from a dense wilderness into fertile farm lands.
    On March 6th, 1846, he was married to Sarah J. Wells who survives him. To them were born eight children, seven of whom are living, two sons and five daughters.
    He had enjoyed reasonably good health until about three weeks preceding his death, whe he was attacked by a very painful illness from which he suffered much pain. His pain and weakness were borne bravely and with few conplaints, he being always glad to meet his friends and neighbors greeting them with the same pleasant smile so characteristic of him in his everyday life and when death summoned him to leave this earthly realm, he closed his eyes and passed peacefully and quietly to his eternal rest. He was a loving husband, kind father and respected neighbor.
It is thus our friends must leave us.
As we journey here below;
But in heaven there is no parting,
There is no sadness, pain or woe,
We will bear this sad affliction,
For 'tis rest on him bestowed;
And we'll journey on more bravely
Thinking of a brighter goal.   Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer - October 20, 1904
Obituary
    The funeral of Rev. Edmund H. Bailiff, who died at 1:15 Sunday morning took place Monday morning at 11 o'clock from the Methodist church, Rev. Robert Barton officiating. For some time the decedent had been grabually sinking and when brought home from Banning the other day his condition was such as to give little hope that he could rally and the end was anticipated. He had been quite prominent in this community for a number of years, having at various times filled the pulpits at the various churches, and preaching at Banning and other places, though not having a regular charge, owing to his need of rest from arduous labors during 24 years activity in the ministry in Kansas. The decedent was born in Calremont county, Ohio, January 20, 1833, and in his forth year removed with his parents to Indiana, were he enlisted at Indianapolis when 32 years of age, serving from the early part of 1865 to the close of the war. He then took up his home in Kansas, serving in the state legislature during the term of 1869-70, when he entered the ministry. At the close of 24 years preaching his health had been undermined and in 1896 he removed with his family to Colton, since which time he has resided here. One of his brothers Silas D. Bailiff, died July 15th in Mich. Another brother, Orrin W. Bailiff, died July 23, in Kansas, he being the last of seven brothers. There were also seven sisters, two of whom are living. He was twice married, his first wife, Miss Sarah Sutton, dying in the East. He leaves a wife and four children, D.O. Bailiff, of Banning, J.E. Bailiff, of Colton, E. G. Bailiff, of San Jose, and Mrs. V. E. Gallagher, of Kansas. The services at the church were largely attended the pall bearing being C.B. Hamilton, T.E. Moon, Jas. Carrigan, R.J. Martin, H.M. Stone and W.E. Stone.The interment was made at Riverside under the auspices of the Grand Army Post at that place.
    They were brothers of Phineas B. Bailiff, deceased, of this county. Findagrave link
North Vernon Plain Dealer - March 28, 1894
Died
    Walker-At her home on O. & M. Avenue, on Thursday evening, March 22nd, 1894, after a short illness, Mrs. Maggie Elizabeth Walker.
    Mrs. Walker was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. R.S. Barnes, and was born in Barnesville, Ohio, October 27, 1872. She leaves a husband and two little children, one almost two years old, the other two weeks old. The funeral services were conducted by C.O. Shirley, March 24th, at the home of the parents of the deceased. Her friends gathered to pay their last respects to the departed and to offer heartfelt sympathy to the husband, father and mother, brothers and sister. No only has the lost the loving companion, and her father's family been broken into by death, but also is the loss felt by many friends who had come to know and love Mrs. Walker.
"One by one we cross the river;
One by one we're gathered home."

North Vernon Plain Dealer - May 15, 1883
Sudden Death
    On Sunday noon Mr. Guy Leavitt went out of his house to drive a cow out of his lot, and not coming back in the course of a couple of hours his wife, who was ill, became seriously alarmed and went out to look for him. Not being able to find him anywhere about the premises, she was more alarmed than ever and made her way to Col. Tripp's residence where she made known her trouble. Search for the old gentleman, who was known to be quite feeble, was made at once. After some time he was found in a remote part of the lot dead. He had been suddenly taken with paralysis of the heart or similar complaint and apparently died without a struggle. Mrs. Leavitt, who is a sister of Colonel Tripp and Mrs. J . W. Cochran, was greatly prostrated by the shock of her husband's sudden death, and has since been in a precarious condition at the house of her brother. Mr. Leavitt was a pioneer of this county, was at least 77 years of age, and greatly respected by all who knew him. His manners were always pleasant, mild and gentle. For years he had been very feeble but on the day of his death was about as usual.

North Vernon Plain Dealer - March 6. 1903
Obituary
    Robert Leavitt was born Nov. 17, 1822, died Feb. 18, 1903, aged eighty years. His birthplace near Batavia, Genesee county, N.Y. The following year the family moved to Chautauqua Lake and three years later settled near Westfield. After a year spent in Canade, the subject of this sketch, Robert Leavitt, located in Vernon, Ind., in 1847. He engaged in manufacturing, which persuit he continued extensively and successfully for fifty years. He possed many excellent business qualifications, being strictly honest and upright in all his business transactions. For many years his manufactory contributed largely toward the up-building and continued prosperity of Vernon and Jennings county. He met with many reverses his manufactory being destroyed by fire three times. Under such circumstances, a man of less energy would have become dishartened but with remarkable perserverance and undaunted courage, time and again did he retrieve his severe losses. He sustained the most kindly relations with his employees, several remaining in his employ from thirty to forty years. May 17, 1853, he was united in marriage to Mary A. Pabody, to this union were born four children, two daughters dying in infancy while two sons survive him. Three months more, and fifty years of happy married life would have been completed. Preparations were already being made to celebrate the "Golden Wedding" anniversary in the month of flowers at the beautiful home of Maplewood, when death claimed the devoted husband and tender father. Only those who were permitted a glimpse into the "inner circle" know how complete and perfect were all the relations of home life. One of Mr. Leavitts chief characteristics was his cheerful, genial nature. There was a heartiness in his handshake and a cordiality in his smile, both irresistable and winning. His hospitality was unbounded. He always welcomed his friends with cheerful greetings and was untiring in his efforts for their entertainment. Mr. Leavitt united with the Presbyterian church, July 1855. He became an elder in 1876, which office he held during the rest of his life. He contributed liberally towards the support of the church and was always a faithful attendant upon church service. He was superintendant of the Sabbath school for many years and taught a class until a few weeks before his death. He was president of the Bible Society, being also much interested in all Foreign Missionary work. The temperance cause found him an earnest advocate, wver working actively for the overthrow of the liquor traffic. Hating all kinds of vice, he was always found on the side of right, laboring for the welfare and elevation of humanity. His entire life was a benediction to all around him and when he was "called up higher" the community lost one of its best citizens, the church one of its most Christ-like members, the family an ideal husband and father. As we review his earnest Christian life, will not the beautiful words of Cardinal Newman find a responsive echo in the hearts of all those who so long had known and loved him? Thou art enshrined In all the fragrance in our memories; For we must ever find, Bare thought of thee Freshen this weary life, while weary life there be. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer - February 25, 1891
Obituary DIED-Little Henry, only child of Chapin and Lizzie Wagner, at the home of his grandfather, J.H. Wagner, in Vernon, Friday morning Feb. 20th, 1891, aged two years, two months and sixteen dayd. The little fellow was a great sufferer for several months. He was first taken sick with a dangerous form of croup that involved his lungs fataly. All that medical skill and loving hearts and hands could suggest, was done to preserve the life so dear to his parents and relatives, but it was unavailing. He was an unusually winsome, precocious child. During his long, painful sickness, he exhibited a patience and intelligence remarkable in one so young. He retained his consciousness to the end, his last breath, almost, being a request for one of the songs which his attendants had been wont to soothe his pain. This blow falls with crushing effect on the undisciplined hearts of his young parents. The human sympathy that goes out to them from overflowing hearts is infufficient now. We point them to that source of infinate comfort whose divine compassion is all sufficient, and bid them look forward to that eternal home where they will be reunited to their little one never to be separated.

William R. Davis died very suddenly at his home five miles southwest of town, Saturday evening. He had done his feeding as usual that evening, and upon going to the house informed his wife that he felt bad, and in a short time afterward breathed his last. Mr. Davis was a good citizen, a kind neighbor and loving husband and father. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his sudden departure. Funeral services were conducted at the family residence, on Monday afternoon, by Rev. J. M. Swarthout after which his remains were conveyed to the Greene cemetery by the members of Rescue Lodge No. 26 K. of P., of this city, of which Mr. Davis was a faithful and exemplary member, and there laid to rest, with beautiful and impressive ceremonies of the Order. Findagrave link

DIED-On Saturday morning, Feb. 21st, Philip, son of Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Heilman, aged 1 year and 8 mos. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. John B. Erben, of Seymour, in the Lutheran church at North Vernon, on Sabbath afternoon, after wich the remains were interred in the city cemetery at that place.

North Vernon Plain Dealer December 23, 1915
OBITUARY
Lusanna , daughter of Mr. and Mrs Aaron Scott, was born January 13, 1827 and died December 13, 1915, aged 88 years and 11 months. She was united in marriage to Phineas Butler on February 24, 1848. To this union were born eight children Caldonia, Arabasis, who died in infancy) Subiski, Alferretta ,Oliva, Milton, Olive and Charles. Three daughters, Mrs. Olive Hoard, Mrs. Alferretta Hoard and Mrs. Oliva McClellan preceded their mother to the Better Land. In the dark days of the Civil War, her husband responded to the call of his country and on June 27, 1862, yeilded up his life for his country in the Seven Days' Battle before Richmond, Va., and he lies buried in the trenches near there. Then left without a husband's protection and aid, she bravely took up the task of providing and raising up her seven little children. Sturdily she worked in the fields, night after night she spun and wove at her loom in the old-fashioned way; daily she struggled on, and aided by Him, who heareth the call of the widow and orphans, she brought her children to manhood and womanhood. Early in her girlhood, she united with the Baptist Church and all through life held to her religious Ideals, going to the church services whenever it was possible. She united with the Coffee Creek Baptist, Church In January 1864, and her membership in this church extended over a period of fifty years and ended only with her death. She leaves to cherish her memory three sons, one daughter, thirty-three grandchildren, fifty - five great grandchildren and four great great-grandchildren; also one brother Robert Scott, of Webberville, Michigan, and one sister, Mrs. Nancy Stewart, Crothersville, Ind.; two half-sisters in Benton County, Ind., and many other relatives and friends. "Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates." Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer March 21, 1912
DEATHS
FOLEY-Mrs. Kate Foley, wife of James P. Foley, died at her home in Denver, Colorado, at about two o'clock Monday morning, March 18th. The deceased was about fifty-one years of age and her death was due to apoplexy. Mrs. Foley was a former resident of this city, being a daughter of the late Terrence Kelley and wife and a sister to Mrs. Wm. Fitzgerald, Mrs. Mary Westover and Mrs. John Balk, of this city. All her life before her marriage to Mr. Foley was spent in this city, and a large circle of friends here were shocked to hear of her sudden death. Mrs. Fitzgerald and Mrs, Westover left Monday afternoon for Denver.
MARKS-Carl Marks, aged 72 years, died at his home at Indianapolis Tuesday, March 19th, and the remains were brought to this city this morning and interred in the city cemetery. The family moved from this city to Columbus several months ago and had moved from there to Indianapolis just a few days before his death. The deceased is survived by his wife and two daughters.

North Vernon Plain Dealer November 28, 1912
The funeral of the little son (Harry R. Ashton)of Milo Ashton and wife occurred at the home last Tuesday, conducted by Rev. Gardener, who indeed spoke comforting words to the friends of the little one, who was almost nine months old. Having been born afflicted, it can truthfully be said a little sufferer has been released. All was done to help in every way possible, but God alone could relieve, so he called him to be an inhabitant of the Heavenly home, where all such as he will be perfect in body and mind and free from all pain. Findagrave listing

North Vernon Plain Dealer January 18, 1917
DEATHS
    STRICKLAND - Paul F. Strickland, aged seventy-five years, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Florence Funke, at Logansport, at three o'clock, Thursday afternoon, January 11th. The remains were brought to this city Friday, and taken to the home of his son, John Strickland, where funeral services were held at nine o'clock Saturday morning, by rev. A.M. Irvine. He is survived by his wife, three sons, John, Ben and Lafe Strickland, of this city, and four daughters: Mrs. Rose Beckshultz, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Martha Miles, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Florence Funke, of Logansport, and Mrs. Emma Light of Wawaka, Texas. Find a grave link
    MATTHIES(MATHIES) - Mrs. Elizabeth Matthies, aged 86 years, 9 months 21 days, died at her home, near Lovett, January 15th. Mrs. Matthies was born at Neiver, Moshen, Germany and came to this country whenquite young and has since lived in this county on the farm near Lovett, where she died. She was the mother of ten children, five of whom are dead. Her maiden name was Elizabeth Rohensweiler. She was a member of the German Evangelical Church in Germany. She was a devoted Christian, a happy mother and a good neighbor. Funeral services were conducted at the Tea Creek German M.E. Church, Wednesday, by Rev. Charles Owens, of Indianapolis, after which the remains were interred in the Church Cemetery. Find a grave link
    VANCE - The remains of the little three-weeks old son of Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Vance were brought here from Rugby, Ind., Saturday afternoon and taken to the home of the child's grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Evan Vance, where funeral services were held Sunday afternoon by Rev. Carroll, of the Baptist Church, after which the remains were interred in the City Cemetery.     PECK - Dorothy Peck (colored) the 17 months old daughter of Gilbert Peck, died at the home of Warner Peck in Geneva Township Thursday, January 11. The remains were interred in the City Cemetery. Find a grave link
VERNON
    The funeral services of Mrs. Mattie West Spencer (maiden name Aramantha Vawter), who died Saturday at Indianapolis, was held here at the Baptist Church on Monday morning, by Rev. Chesley Holmes pastor of the church. Mrs. Spencer was the daughter of the late Jesse (R.) Vawter. She was born near North Vernon, June 1858. She was married to James West in 1876 and to this union were born three children, Mrs. Nellie Wright, Mrs. Sadie (Sarah) McClure, now of Indianapolis and a son Willie, who died several years ago. About twelve years ago Mrs. West was married to Mr. Fountain Spencer. For many years Mrs. Spencer lovingly and tenderly cared for her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Vawter. Her mother now in the 97th year of her age residing in her home at the time of Mrs. Spencer's heath. Several brothers and sisters beside her husband, two daughters and two grandchildren are surviving members of her family.     Fountain Spencer, Mrs. Nellie Wright and daughter, Opal, Mr. and Mrs. McClure, Mrs. John Price and daughter, Lavonne, Mr. Logan Boggs and wife, M.A. Shepherd and wife, of Indianapolis, Mrs. Gussie Carey, of Cincinnati, were here on Monday on account of the funeral of Mrs. Mattie West Spencer. Find a grave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer September 27, 1917
OBITUARY
Leaves have their time to fall
And flowers to wither at the north winds' breath
And stars to set-but all
Thou has all seasons for thine own
O' death
    The subject of this sketch, James Canfield was born at New York City, New York, Aug. 12th, 1838, departed this life Sept. 23rd, 1917, after an illness extending over a period of a year. Although very ill for several weeks prior to his death he never gave up and was only confined to his bed fifteen days, being at the time of his death 79 years, 1 month and 12 days of age. He was married to Miss Ann Hartwell, of North Vernon, Ind. To this union was born seven children, his wife and two children having preceded him to the better land. He leaves two daughters, three sons and ten grandchildren, besides a host of friends to mourn his departure. As a father he was kind and loving giving his service and counsel to his children. He never became tired serving his family and friends and was always willing to lend assistance when within his power to do so. At the age of 20 he enlisted in the Civil War, being a member of Co. A. 22nd Ind. Inf. and faithfully served his country for three years. Such is the brief history of the life of the departed. Findagrave Link
ERNST-Mrs. Kate Ernst, aged 69 years, died at her home in this city, Saturday, September 22nd. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. G.L. Widerin, at St. Mary's Catholic Church Monday morning and interment was made in St. Mary's Cemetery. One son Joe Ernst, survives.
SHOAF-Mrs. David Shoaf, aged 60 years, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Gohn, in this city, Thursday night, September 20th. Burial took place in the Kellar Cemetery, Sunday afternoon.
CAMPFIELD-James Campfield, aged 78 years, died at his home in the Zion neighborhood, Sunday, September 23rd. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Don Davis, Tuesday, at the residence, and burial took place in the Baldwin Cemetery.
North Vernon Plain Dealer October 31, 1918
NOON-Miss Rose Noon, aged 30 years, died at her home north of this city, Saturday night, October 26th, after an illness of several weeks. Funeral services were held Wednesday morning and the burial took place in St. Mary's Cemetery. She is survived by her father Thomas Noon, two brothers, Will Noon of New albany, and Allan Noon, who is in military service at Camp Sherman, and one sister, Miss Alice Noon, who resides with her father, and also a host of friends. Rose Noon was a young woman of sterling qualities and splendid character. Her life was marked by many sacrifices and deeds of kindness for her brothers and sisters and for her father and her mother whose death occurred but a few months ago. She was bright and capable and was a teacher in the county schools for several years. Findagrave link
McCONNELL-Benjamin Foster McConnell, aged 70 years, died at his home near Scipio, Monday morning, October 28th, after an illness of eighteen weeks. Funeral services were held at the house on Wednesday afternoon and the burial took place in the Scipio Cemetery. He is survived by his wife and three children; Mrs. Grace Grinstead, of Cincinnati; Harry McConnell, who lives with his mother, and Walton McConnell, of Middletown, Ohio. Mr. McConnell was one of the prominent farmers of the county. He was born and spent his entire life on the farm where he died, which is located about three miles west of Scipio. DIES IN FRANCE
    The Franklin Evening Star of October 16th announced the death of Carol D. Shuck, of that city, whose death occurred from pneumonia, September 7, in France, where he was serving with the American Expeditionary Forces. He is the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. P.F. Shuck, and was well known here through his visits at their home.
WILKERSON-Mrs. Alice Bortz Wilkerson, aged 62 years, died at her home on North State Street at 11:30 o'clock Tuesday morning. October 29th, after a lingering illness. Funeral services will be held at two o'clock Thursday afternoon, by Rev. P.O. Duncan, a Baptist minister of Waynetown, Ind., and the burial will take place in the City Cemetery. The deceased was born at Greenville, Pa., February 24th, 1856. She was educated in the Greenville schools, after which she entered Dana's Musical Institute at Warren, Ohio. While a student there she met William Wilkerson, who was also a student, and they were married September 25th, 1876. They came to North Vernon immediately after their marriage and she has since resided. Her husband died September 23, 1903. They were the parents of seven children two of whom are dead. The living children are; Mrs. Josephine Thompson of Decatur County; Mrs. Florence Van Cleave, of Jennings County; Carl B. Wilkerson of Jennings County; William T. Wilkerson of North Vernon; and Clarence S. Wilkerson, who is at present in military service at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station. Findagrave link
North Vernon Plain Dealer September 30, 1923
OBITUARY
    On July 30th 1923, Finley T. Semon one of the leading citizens of Jennings County, passed away at his home in Vernon. His death came after a protracted illness. All his life he had been an exceptionally active and vigorous man, usually in robust health, until in the Spring of 1922 he suffered a nervous breakdown, due largely, no doubt, to his very energy and anxious care for others to who whom his life was always devoted. Following the break in his health he was unable to regain his full strength, although he still continued to be about for a large part of the time, looking after his numerous business affairs. Several weeks prior to his death he suffered a second nervous stroke from which his constitution, which he had always preserved by clean and healthful living, was unable to rally and the end came on the 30th of July 1923, with his wife and son and his two brothers and one sister and other relatives at his bedside. After funeral ceremonies at the Catholic Church at North Vernon he was laid to rest in the cemetery at Vernon, amid a large gathering of friends from this and other counties where he was known and loved as a friend.
    Finley T. Semon was born, December 8th, 1858 in Ripley County, Indiana, at the time of his death, he was thus in his 65th year. He was educated in the public schools of St. Magdalene, in Ripley County and afterward attended the training course for teachers in Moores Hill College at Moores Hill, Indiana. For 19 years following this he taught in the Ripley County schools, where many a young man and woman received from his earnest and sincere personality and high ideals of character a permanent impress for good upon their lives.
    In the year 1901, he left the school room and purchased the flour mill at New Marion in Ripley County, and in July 1902 he purchased the Vernon flour mill from Herbert Goff, and moved to Vernon, where he resided until his death. He at once became active in local affairs, proved himself a sound and sagacious business man and was made a director in the North Vernon National Bank, and was a promoter of all activities for the good of the community. At the time of his death he was also President of the Jennings Building and Loan Association an office in which he served faithfully for many years. During the War he was especially energetic in "doing his bit" and in promoting all the War activities, as loyalty to his country was as natural to him as loyalty to his family or church. He was a believer in the Catholic faith and for many years a member of the North Vernon Catholic Church. He was a deeply religious man. On one occasion speaking to some friends he argued with earnest conviction for the Catholic Confessional, which he believed furnished a great restraint upon young people in that it lead them frequently to confess their sins and take a fresh start in the struggle for a moral and religious life.
    It was seldom one called at Mr. Semon's home and did not find him reading, either the newspapers and current magazines or some good book. He was in politics a life long Democrat and for a time was treasurer of the County Democratic Committee. While earnest in his political beliefs he was not a violent partisan and strove always to see both side of public questions. His very sense of fairness led him sometimes to make enemies, but he made them honestly and every one knew where he stood. As he often remarked a man without enemies does not amount to much. Mr. Semon kept himself abreast of the times and expressed his earnest convictions without fear but always with tolerance and consideration for those who differed with his opinions. He gave great credit to those of different convictions for being honest and sincere as he always was himself.
    Love for and loyalty to his town love for his home which he filled with kindness, devotion to his family and friends, thoughtfulness for others, and their happiness and comfort before his own; these were the outstanding elements in his character. No one will know many of his deeds of charity and kindness as charity seemed so natural to him that he did not make a show of it. It seemed as natural to him to be charitable as it did to attend to business and consequently he seldom spoke of it. Indeed sound charity and sound business he thought was one and the same thing. His liberality of opinion was shown by the fact that while himself a Catholic yet he often contributed to promoting the activities of other churches in the community. No worthy cause failed to receive his earnest support. The bent of his mind and thoughts was shown in his daily speech in which he often qroted some line from some great writer or poet, or from the Bible. He Was especially fond of Bryant one of the great religious poets of the English race.
    On the 12th of August 1894 Mr. Semon was married to Anna Belle Naylor, of Ripley County, and his death brings to an end a happy married life of 29 years. One son, William T. Semon was born to this marriage and the mother and son remain to mourn the loss of a man, who was a kind and loving husband father, a sincere and dependable friend, an active educator and sound business man, and all that is summed up in the phrase, "a good Christian citizen" it is the lives of such men that give us renewed faith in that it pays to be good, that righteousness is the right way to live and that immortality is as natural as life itself and the only possible outcome of a life of justice, and truth and that faith in God which to those who cherish it, as Mr. Semon, did is the devine guarantee of enernal life on the other side. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer September 8, 1921
OBITUARY
    Cort Hayes son of Mahion B. and Lucinda J. Hayes, was born in Dearborn County, Indiana, August 2nd, 1861 and departed this life August 19, 1921 aged 60 years and 14 days. His father enlisted in the Civil War and his mother came with her four children to Jennings County, where the family have since made their home with the exception of a few years. Cort was married April 6th, 1892 to May Comer of near Queensville. To this union were born five children Arvilla Adams, Nona Helen, who preceded almost twelve years ago and Russell B. , Blanch and Lucille, who were at home. He united with the U. B. Church at Pleasant View nearly thirty years ago, and has since remained a faithful member. Of late years he was a great sufferer, although he never was in bed much and often expressed his willingness to go and be at rest. Altho the summons came suddenly while he was on his knees in the potato patch cutting a few weeds we are sure he was ready to go. Court has been a faithful member for a number of years of the I.O.O.F. and M.W. of America, both of Scipio. His place in the lodge will be missed by all its members as he was one of a jovial disposition and ever ready to enter into anything for the good of the orders. As a neighbor and a friend in need, can be vouched by all those who have lived near him. His frequent calls among his neighbors will be greatly missed as his little visits (though sick and a sufferer) were full of jokes, and the bright side of life. He was strictly honest and upright in all his dealings with his fellowmen, and always tried to practice the Golden Rule, "Do unto others as you would that others would do unto you." So we have before us a character worthy of imitation, and we can truly say "The Lord gave; the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord." The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Nicholson at the residence, after which he was laid to rest in the Bear Creek cemetery. The I.O.O.F. and M.W. of A. officiated at the grave. The funeral was very largely attended. Besides the wife and children, three grandsons and a host of relatives and friends mourn their loss. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer & Republican October 29, 1914
DEATHS
    SEMON-Edmond Semon, aged about 65 years died at his home near Grayford, at nine o'clock, Sunday night, October 25th. His death was the result of the third stroke of paralysis, which he sustained. Thursday of last week. Funeral services were conducted at Bethel Church, in Ripley County, Wednesday, by Rev. C.E. Hughes and the remains were interred in Bethel Cemetery. His wife and six grown children survive. Findagrave link
    PIERCE-Thomas Pierce, aged seventy years, a former resident of Vernon, died at his home at Kokomo, Thursday, October 22nd. The remains were brought to Vernon, Saturday, where funeral services were conducted at the M.E. Church, by Rev. Homer Manuel. The remains were interred in Vernon Cemetery. The deceased was a Veteran of the Civil War and was also a member of the I.O.O.F. Lodge, His wife and two sons survive.
    CARNEY-Mrs. Parie Carney, aged 69 years, died at her home at Vernon, Friday morning, October 23. Although she had been ailing for many months, and the members of her family realized that her condition was quite serious, the end came as a great shock to them, her death occurring while her daughters and son were ministering to her. The deceased was one of the most respected and highly esteemed women of the county, and a host of friends mourn her death, and extend their sympathy to the bereaved family. Funeral services were conducted at the residence, Sunday afternoon, by Rev. W. D. Cole, of the Vernon Presbyterian Church, and the remains were laid to rest in the Vernon Cemetery. She is survived by two daughters, Misses Annie and Cora, of Vernon; and three sons, John R., of Vernon; Frank, of Indianapolis; and Roscoe, of St. Louis. The relatives from a distance who attended the funeral were: John Ross, wife and daughter, and Dr. James Shields, of Seymour; George Duncan and wife and Omar Duncan, wife and family, of Sharpsville; Miss Dora Newby and Mrs. Susan Hoback, of Goldsmith, Ind.; Jack Shields and wife, of Seymour; Mr. and Mrs. Ernest McHaffee, of Coastville, Ind.; and Henry Carney, of Franklin.     Parie Stokes Newby was born March 17, 1845, on the Newby farm one and one-half miles west of Vernon. She was a daughter of James Hobbs and Mary Ellen Newby. Her mother's maiden name was Sheilds. Her half brother on her mother's side, Jesse L. Cain, while fighting for the Union during the Civil War, was killed in battle at Champion Hill, before the siege of Vicksburg. Her half sister on her father's side, Georgianna Logan Chase, of Center, Howard County, is a surviving sister. An older sister, Sarah Jane Johnson and a younger sister, Susanna P. Chase Hoback, of Goldsmith, Ind., and two younger sisters, Miss Dora LaBoone Newby and Mrs. Mary Florence Asche, of Indianapolis, and her brother Harry Howard Newby, of San Rafael, California, survive her. In early life she attended school at the Brick school west of Vernon, also at North Madison, at Indianapolis and at Vernon. When but thirteen years of age, while attending school at Indianapolis, because of her proficiency in mathematics and reading, she acted as supply teacher. For several years before her marriage she was a successful school teacher in Jennings County. On September 27, 1866, she was wedded to John Carney, a most worthy gentleman and scholar. To this union were born six children, two daughters, Annie F. and Cora M., four sons, Jesse Howard, James Frank, John Ralph and Henry Roscoe. Mrs. Carney was a great helpmate to her husband in his active career as a school teacher, attorney-at-law, county superintendent of schools and county auditor. On November 12, 1876, her eldest son, Jesse Howard Carney, a lovely child, died in the fifth year of his age. On November 13, 1880, soon after he was elected county auditor, Mr. Carney was suddenly called by death, leaving this beloved mother at the age of thirty-five, a widow with five children, the eldest being thirteen years of age and the youngest eighteen months old. But with a mother's love and devotion she raised her children to be successful men and women. For several years after her husband's death, she taught school in Jennings County, a part of the time being at North Vernon, where her late husband had been the first superintendent of schools. She departed this life on Friday morning, October 23, 1914, at seven o'clock. The cause of death was a complication of diseases. During her early life she united with the Presbyterian church of Vernon, but later in life, owing to home cares and partial deafness, she was not an active member, but was always a devoted Christian mother and a noble Christian woman. Mrs. Carney was a deep student and a great reader and loved good literature. She was an exact student of history. She was always loyal to her town and her country and always rejoiced at the progress of the people, institutions and industries of Vernon and Jennings County.
BENNETT-Mrs. Carolyn Bennett, aged 75 years, died at Hayden, Tuesday, October 20th. The remains were taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Victoria McIntire, north of Hayden, where the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Jann, Thursday, October 22nd. The remains were interred in the Hayden Cemetery. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer February 15, 1877
DIED
    CRAYTON-On January 11th, 1877, at the residence of her brother in Clermont county, Ohio, Mrs. Mary Crayton, in her 82nd year. She was a resident of this county for many years, and was a member of the Vernon Presbyterian church. (Banner please copy.)
    WILSON-On January 27th, 1877, at Hazeldell, Ill, of inflamation of the lungs, Mollie, wife of Harry Wilson, and daughter of Dr. B.F. Little, formerly of Columbus, Ind. She was a devoted christian, having connected herself with the M.E. church in her early youth and she strived to serve God as long as she lived. The day before she died in speaking of her future, she said: "The day is bright, but my prospects are brighter."
    ECKLES-On Tuesday, February 13th, at the residence of his son, in this place, Mr. John Eckles, aged over 80 years.
    STOUT-On Monday, February 5th, 1877, Evermont G., youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J.N. Stout, at Trafalgar, Ind. Findagrave link
PARIS CROSSING, Feb.12, 1877
    Mrs. Cassia (Cassandra) Deputy died on the morning of the 7th. The funeral sermon was preached on the 8th by Rev. S. Tinker, after which the remains were interred in family burying ground on Coffee creek. Mrs. Deputy was one of the pioneers of this county having come here in 1810. She had been a member of the M.E. Church for more than forty years. Findagrave link
Father Oesterling
    On Friday morning, 9th inst., Father Oesterling died and on Monday, in accordance with an expressed wish in his first sermon in the church, he was buried in front of St. Mary's altar in St. Ann's church, on Long Branch, in the presence of a host of friends. For many years he had been in charge of the church above name, and was beloved by all his church people. In his intercourse with persons holding opposite religious oppinions he was always the polite and courteous gentleman. He interested himself with little outside of his profession, and was a friend to everybody.

North Vernon Plain Dealer April 3, 1889
    James Kane, a member of the old 6th regiment, died suddenly at the home of his son Patrick Kane, in Sandcreek township, on Saturday morning. He arose as well as usual from his bed, ate a heartily breakfast, and suddenly died, possibly of apoplexy. His remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at this place on Sunday. He was 79 years of age. Findagrave link
DIED
    READ-On Tuesday, March 26th, 1889, four-year old son of Samuel Read and wife, at their home one mile south of Butlers Switch. Funeral services at the house and burial on Thursday at Freedom church.
    McNUTT-On Saturday, March 30, 1889, at his residence near Butlers Switch, of pneumonia, Perdillus McNutt, aged 66 years, 11 months and 19 days. Funeral services and burial at Freedom church on Monday. Findagrave link
    SMITH-At his residence in this city, at 12 o'clock Tuesday night, of apoplexy, John Smith, aged about 65 years.
    KELLEY-On Tuesday afternoon, April 2d, 1889, George, son of A.J. Kelley and wife, aged 19 years, after a lingering illness.

North Vernon Plain Dealer August 17, 1911
DIED
More - The remains of Mrs. Florence More, who died at her home in Janesville, Wis., Monday, were brought to this city Wednesday and taken to Hayden, where funeral services were conducted at the Baptist Church at 12:30. The remains were interred in the Hayden Cemetery. Mrs. More was a former resident of this city and Hayden, having from this city about four years ago. She is survived by two daughters, Mrs. Nellie Sandifur and Miss Matie More, of Janesville, and one son, Bruce More, of Dickstone Gap, Va., all of whom are well known here. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer August 24, 1922
AGED RESIDENT DIES
    Charles Bonner Shed, eighty-one years old, died at his home, near Queensville, Friday, August 18th. Funeral services were held at Pleasant View Church, Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. C.P. Gibbs. The burial took place in Cave Springs Cemetery. He is survived by his wife and several children.

North Vernon Plain Dealer August 21, 1877
From Decatur County
    Died, at Westport, on Tuesday, the 24th of July, Mr. James Thomas. He had been afflicted for many years, and the last four years has been paralyzed and totally blind. He leaves a wife and child. His remains were interred in Horseshoe graveyard. He has a great many relatives in Jennings County.
    Also on the 27th, of consumption, Mrs. Wm. T. Stott, daughter of Mrs. Bennett. She leaves a husband and four small children. Findagrave link

DIED,
KNOLL-On Sunday night, July 29th 1877, at her home in this city, Mrs. ____ Knoll, wife of Henry Knoll. The remains were interred in the cemetery north of town on Monday.
LALLY-On July 30th, at his residence in this city, Mr. Michal Lally, aged about 65 years of age.

North Vernon Plain Dealer May 22, 1883
LOVETT COLUMN
Died, March 7th, at his residence near Centerville, Volentine Oachs (Ochs), in his 74th year. Funeral preached by Rev. Frichey, a German preacher of Charleston. Remains buried on the farm near Centerville. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer February 11, 1870
Johnson W. Summerfield,
    For the past five years Clerk of Jennings County, and previously Deputy Clerk for a number of years, died at his residence, in Vernon, at one o'clock on last Friday morning, after several days dangerous and painful illness. and many months physical prostration. He was n man of fine social qualities, and by the urbanity of his manners he won for himself, during his life, and his death is regretted by, many warm personal friends. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer February 8, 1876
Died
    In Osgood, Tuesday night, Feb. 1st, after a short illness, Zerelda wife of Jeremiah Dickerson, in the 39th year of her age. Funeral services were held in the M.E. church Wednesday, and the remains were taken to Versailles for internment. Mr. Jeremiah Dickerson is a brother of Mr. John N. Dickerson of this city. Findagrave link

    Catherine Feagler, aged eleven years, daughter of Orman F. Feagler, who lives two miles east of town, died at her home on last Saturday morning. On last Wednesday, while playing with some other children at school, by accident or inadvertence, she ran violently against the teacher's desk and received an internal injury, which caused her death.

Vernon Banner December 27, 1871
OBITUARY
    Died, December 12th, 1871, at the residence of his Son-in-law, in Howard Co., Seth M. Chase, in the 75th year of his age, of paralysis of the left side, after an illness of three days.
    The deceased was born in the State of New York, on the third day of September, 1797; was married to Miss Margaret Whitney, on the 25th of July, 1817. A few years after his marriage he moved to Jennings Co., Ind., near Vernon, where he remained a few years, when he moved to Bartholomew county, where his wife and oldest son died, when he removed to Jennings county were he married Miss Phebe Wagner, March 22, 1829. He resided in Jennings county from that time until December, 1863, when he moved to Howard county, Ind., where his wife died, July 23rd, 1864. Since that time he has lived with hiw children. The deceased was the father of twelve children. Seven of the number is still living. S.W.C. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer April 1, 1873
Obituary
    Departed this life, March 18th, 1873, Mr. John W. Fields, aged 70 years, two months and twenty-eight days. He was born in Rockingham county, North Carolina, Becember 20th, 1802 and emigrated to Scott, Virginia, when a small boy. He married Miss Susan Heaberlin, of Russel county, Va., March 10th, 1830, and moved to this state in 1849. He was the father of eight children, four sons and four daughters, of which only two daughters and one son remain. He also leaves a loving companion and a large number of friends who mourn his loss. He was a devoted husband and father, and was a firm believer in the Universal doctrine until January 8th, 1872, when he was soundly converted and joined the United Brethern church, since which time he has been a devoted follower of Christ, ready and willing at all times to testify to the goodness of God, and that christ has power on earth to forgive sins, and exhorting sinners to not delay as he had done. During his christian life, he set an example well and worthy for any of us to follow. J.I.R.

North Vernon Plain Dealer January 18, 1877
DIED
    DAVID HAMANT, on last Sunday morning after lingering a short time; was confined to his bed but a few days. Subject of this sketch was born in Sturbridge, Worchester Co. Mass., March 18, 1800; he came to this state when about 33 years old and was married to Miss Mary McConnell, Oct. 29, 1835, Rev. John Vawter officiating. For some time after coming to this State he was engaged in teaching. After removing to Scipio, Ind., he united with Bethel Presbyterian church at this place, about thrity-five years ago, under the pastoral service of Rev. David Latimore, and be served as deacon of the church the last thirty years of his life, and what time the writer has been acquainted with him seemed to be very consistent as a christian and citizen, leading the most quiet life of any person we ever met with. He passed quietly away, leaving his companion, aged about sixty-eight years, one son and a large circle of friends to mourn his departure. Funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church on Monday at 11 o'clock a.m. conducted by Rev. S.J. Brownson. - T.C. Clapp - Scipio, Jan. 16th. Findagrave link

Vernon News November 21, 1906
GEORGE SPECHT
    The angel of Death has again visited our midst and called to the eternal home, one of Vernons oldest citizens, George Specht, who departed this life on November 16, 1906, at the ripe old age of 77 years, 1 month and 2 days, after a long and long and lingering illness through which he bore his sufferings patiently, and was ready for the call of the reaper when it came. Deceased was born in Bergstadt, Germany, a small Prussian village where he lived with his parents until he was 17 years, when the family came to America, landing in New York, after a voyage of 55 days. They went directly to Philadelphis, where Mr. Specht entered a shoe store, and after several years of hard work and perseverance, mastered his trade. The family moved to Indianapolis in 1851 and the following year moved to Vernon occupying the property now occupied by John Hengstler. Here Mr. Specht took up his trade, and in 1853 built on the site of his recent shop. In 1859, he was a heavy loser in a disastrous fire that visited Vernon and gutted the business portion of the town, but out of the ruins arose the building in which the present generation have watched him work at his trade. He worked up a good business by his honesty and excellent workmanship and supplied many of the citizens of the county with boots and shoes, made from years of experience and there are many Jennings county people who will point to their boots two years hence and say, "Uncle George Specht made them." He was ever true to his adopted country and during the Civil War, shouldered his gun to protect Vernon and its citizens from the famous raid of John Morgan. He was a jovial and entertaining gentleman, and won many friends by his kindly words. He was a good scholar being well versed in both German and English. He was married to Elizabeth Leininger on March 12, 1854, nine children being born to them, four of whom survive, Mrs. Kathryn Harman, Miss Anna Specht, of Vernon, Frank and Charles Specht, of Indianapolis. Other surviving relatives are a brother Philip Specht, of Jeffersonville, two sisters, Mrs. John Reddinger, of Seymour, and Mrs. Henry Toedly, of North Vernon, four grandchildren and one great grandchild. Mrs. Specht died February 10, 1900, only a few weeks short of fifty years of happy married life. No man or woman can be held in more higher esteem than was this old couple, known so well, and it is well with us, that he go to join his Maker and his loved one in the better land. The funeral services were held at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Henry Harman, Sunday afternoon, at 2 o'clock conducted by A. G. Yount, Ph. D., of the Presbyterian church. Burial in the Vernon cemetery. Findagrave link
    William Black an old time resident of this township and city, died, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Lannie Neely, of Elm street, Sunday morning about 7 o'clock. Interment in City Cemetery Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Rev. H. J. Black had charge of the funeral services at the house. Mr. Black was about 70 years old. He was an old soldier of the Civil War, was wounded at one time and was with Sherman on the famous march to the sea. About one month ago Mr. Black fell from the second sotory of the Linden Hotel and the injuries was the cause of his death.

Vernon Jornal August 12, 1896
DIED
    SIMEON HARTWELL - At his home in Vernon, Aug. 6, 1896, after an illness of several weeks, at the age of 63 years. He was born and raised in Vernon and spent his entire life here, except three years, which he spent in the service of his country as a union soldier. He was a peaceful, inoffensive citizen and his death removes from Vernon an old familiar land mark. Deceased was buried by Baldwin Post G.A.R of which he was a member. Funeral services conducted by the Rev. Horace Spear of the Baptist church on Friday Aug. 7th. He leaves a wife, one son and one daughter to mourn his loss. Findagrave link

North Vernon Sun August 8, 1925
CIVIL WAR VETERAN DEAD
    John J. Buchanan, aged 82, died at his home in Hayden Saturday of heart disease. Mr. Buchanan served thruout the civil war (Company A, 9th Indiana Legion). He was a member of the K. of P. and the Hayden Baptist church.
    Surviving are his wife and two sons and seven daughters.
    Funeral services were held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning at the home in Hayden, the Rev. Wade officiating and Wm. Nauer, Bert Nauer, E.J. Welker, Wm. Randall, Louis Eitel and Judge R. Carney acting as pall bearers. Burial was in Queensville cemetery. Findagrave link

North Vernon Sun October 30, 1930
OBITUARY
    Milton F. Easton, the son of Horace and Aurelia Eastman was born April 1, 1851, on the Eastman homestead near North Vernon. On this place he spent his childhood and his entire life. He was a faithful member of the Hayden M.E. Church at the time of his death and had been for many years. He belonged to the Knights of Pythias Lodge at North Vernon and was I think the oldest member of the lodge. He spent most of his life caring for others. He was prominent in public life. He served as commissioner of Jennings County for six years. He was beloved by his nephews and nieces and other relatives and a host of friends. He is survived by two brothers, Calvin R. Eastman of Mt. Healthy, O., and Oliver M. Eastman of North Vernon, Ind., and a sister, Miss Josephine Eastman also of North Vernon. He leaves eleven nephews and nieces. At the time of his death he was visiting his nephew, Carl Eastman in Detroit, Mich., in hopes of regaining his health. His death was caused by asthma and bronchial pneumonia on Oct. 20th, 1930. His age was 78 years 6 months and 19 days. Findagrave link

Banner Plain Dealer September 15, 1900
Died
Thomas-On Wednesday, August 8, 1900, at his home in Lovett township, Jennings county, Mr. John S. Thomas, of general debility, aged 79, years.     Mr. Thomas was born in Jennings county, Indiana, on February 25, 1821, and was always a resident here, where he grew to manhood and became one of the county's foremost citizens and most prosperous farmers. In October 1852, he was married to Isabella Lattimore, who died December 27, 1872. In December 1874, he married Catherine May, who died October 19, 1875. He was then united to Nancy Jane Lattimore in November 1883 who died March 3, 1894. To the first union there were born seven children, three of whom survive him. They are T.L. Thomas, John H. Thomas and M.R. Thomas. Four grandchildren also survive him. He was a gentleman in every sense of the word, admired by a large circle of friends and respected by his few enemies. It has been said of him by one who knew him well: "He was a man of sterling priniples, strong in his likes and dislikes but no man ever applied to John S. Thomas for aid and went away empty-handed. Findagrave link

North Vernon Sun June 9, 1900
Obituary
    Died, at her home, December 19th, 1902, Susan Low, wife of Emens Low. She was born September 16, 1862, and was 40 years, 2 months and 3 days old. She was married to Emens Low November 5th, 1885. To this union was born five children, three sons and two daughters. She united with the Brush Creek Baptist Church twenty years ago and remained a faithful member. She leaves a father, mother, two brothers, four sisters, a husband five children to mourn their loss. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. J.C. Nicholson at the Brush Creek church Sunday Dec. 21st, 1902, and the remains were laid to rest in the Brush Creek cemetery. She is gone but not forgotten. Findagrave link

Vernon Journal February 13, 1895
Obituary
    Isaiah Green died Monday morning, January 7, at 10 o'clock, at his late home on his farm, five miles southwest of Paola. The deceased had suffered intensely for several years and growing gradually worse his death was not a surprise to his family and friends. The cause of his suffering and death dated back to when he was a boy of fourteen. He was chopping down a tree when a large limb fell on him and broke his leg, which necessitated amputation near the knee. He was able to get around fairly well until twelve years ago, when symptoms of mortification of the limb became apparent, for which there was no relief.
    Mr. Green was highly esteemed by every one who ever knew him. He led a Christian life and was a decon in the Baptist church, having united with that church forty years ago. He had a wide acquaintance in early days and took an active part in politics. He was continuously elected assessor of Stanton twp. until his health became such that he could not perform the duties of the office. He was a native of North Carolina, where he was born August 28, 1809, being eighty five years old at his death. When a child he moved to Jennings Co. Idiana, with his parents, where he grew to manhood and married Mary McKinney, he and the late Daniel Childs marying sisters. Mr. Green was a member of the Whig party and was twice elected by that party to the office of Sheriff of Jennings county. He became a Republican at the organization of that party and remained steadfast to its principles.
    His aged wife survives him, as do also two daughters and two son. Mrs. Stephen Day of Stanton, Mrs. Mary Guy of Ottawa, one son at Mount Ida and one son on the homestead. The funeral services, conducted by Rev. Her, will be held this Friday morning, at 10 o'clock, at the Plum Creek church, from where the remains will be taken for interment to the cemetery at Osawatomie. Findagrave link


    The death of Daniel Childs at his home on his farm in Stanton Tp., Monday, Jan. 7th, takes away another of the first settlers who were closely identified with the settlement of Miami Co., and who was one of our best citizens and most substantial farmers. Three years ago he had an attack of the grippe, which left him in poor health, and although quite feeble at times he could not be content to be inactive, and was clearing a patch of timber on his farm when he contracted a severe cold about a month ago, which terminated in his death.
    The deceased was born in Massachusetts, June 20, 1814. At four years of age he removed with his parents to Steuben county, N.Y. (now Scheyler Co.) from where he removed to Jennings Co., Indiana, in 1837, teaching school there. He resided in that county until 1860, when he came to this county and settled on the farm where he died. During the war he was enrolled a member of the Kansas militia and was on duty during the Price raid. He was elected County Clerk of Miama county in the fall of 1861, was re-elected three times and served eight years. He was married in Indiana, March 17, 1841, to Sallie C. McKinney. They had four sons and three daughters, who are living and most of whom are married and reside in this county. Mrs. Childs died in 1867. In 1868 he was united to Miss Sarah B. Young in New York, who survives him. He also leaves one brother, Phillander Childs, who resided in Stanton Twp.
    Mr. Childs was a devout Christian and a good citizen, a member of the Masonic order and of the Baptist church, having united with the church when quite young. His remains were brought to the Baptist church in Paola, Wednesday afternoon, where the funeral services, conducted by Rev. E. Lee Howard, were held. His remains were buried in the Paola cemetary.--The Miami, (Kansas) Republican. Findagrave link

Obituary
    Elizabeth Storms was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, Sept. 9th, 1806, and departed this life Jan.29, 1895, aged 88 yrs, 4 months and 20 days.
    She was married to George Vantreese in Hamilton county, Ohio, April 5, 1827. They moved near Westport, Decatur county, Ind., their present place of residence, Oct. 18, 1833.
    Unto them were born five boys and four girls, of whom three boys and four girls survive her. On Jan. 22, she had a paralytic stroke from which she never recovered. She leaves a husband, ninty one years old, seven children, thrity-five grand-children and thrity great grand-children to mourn her loss. Findagrave link

Vernon Journal September 30, 1896
OBITUARY
    DIED-At his home near Hege, on Thursday morning, Sept. 24th, 1896, James Weedon Hammond, third son of Theopolis and Mary Hammond. He was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., Feb. 8th, 1875, making his age 21 years, 7 months and 16 days. He had been confined to his room with typhoid fever for two months causing heart trouble which resulted in his death. He leaves father, mother, grand-mother, five brothers and four sisters, besides a host of other relatives and friends to mourn his early demise. Weed was a general favorite, not only in the home circle where he was best known but in the neighborhood he was universally loved and respected.
    He will be sadly missed by those who knew him best for he ever had a smile and pleasant word of greeting for one and all. Many are the expressions of endearment that came not only from nearest relatives but from neighbors and a large circle of friends and acquaintances.
    The kind affectionate brother and son is gone.
    He was laid to rest on Friday afternoon in the Springer cemetery near Elizabethtown, followed by a large concoourse of sorrowing relatives and friends. Rev. David T. Newsome conducted the services at the grave.
    Weed is not dead but gone before. O.C. Findagrave link

OBITUARY
    Mrs. L.D. Pennington, whose maiden name was Elizabeth A. Stone, was born Sept. 4, 1830, on the old Boner farm, about one mile south of the residence in which she died. Her girlhood days were passed in Vernon, at which place she was married on March 21, 1850, to Lorenzo D. Pennington by Elder Hickman New, after which they settled at Westport, Ind., and lived at that place until they moved to their present residence in April, 1865. She passed away at 6 o'clock a.m., Sept. 18, 1896, after eight months of intense suffering. She leaves a husband and seven children-three sons and four daughters, and a host of friends to mourn their loss. A long time prior to her death she knew her disease was incurable, but her faith was placed in Him who can cure all pain and she trustingly awaited the coming of the Great Physician. Shortly before her death she called her family to her bedside and bade them good bye, requesting them to place their trust in the Lord. Then, suddenly raising her clasped hands, and looking toward heaven, exclaimed, "Into your hands I put my fate," and expired. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Horace Spears at the family residence and her remains were laid to rest in the Vernon Cemetery. Findagrave link

Vernon Journal January 30, 1895
OBITUARY
    Pearl Rochat Hand was born at Marble Corner, Ripley County, Ind., Feb., 5th, 1876. Died Jan. 14th, 1895. She was married to Howard Hand, Dec. 24, 1893. She leaves a husband and her father, three sisters, two brothers and a host of friends to mourn her loss. She joined the Methodist Episcopal church at Marble Corner in 1892. During the revival meeting held at that place last October she was present a number of times and always testified to the love of Jesus. Until her health failed her she continued a faithful and consistent christian, when God took her from the church Militant to the church Triumphant. While enduring untold suffering at the last she was happy in a Savior's love and her death was one of great victory. Her funeral took place at the Big Creek Church, Jan. 16th, 1895, and was conducted by her pastor T.J. Tone. Her body was interred near the church where the funeral was held, a large congregation being present. Findagrave link

North Vernon Plain Dealer September 7, 1892
OBITUARY
MRS. MARTHA CAMPBELL
    The death of Mrs. Martha Campbell on August 18, 1892, at her home near Queensville, removes from the community one of the most respected residents. Her death was caused by heart failure. She had been ailing but her death came very unexpectdly.
    Mrs. Campbell was 62 years, 4 months and 29 days old. Her maiden name was Martha Atkinson and she was born in Switzerland county, Indiana, March 19, 1830. On March 21, 1847 she was married to Cyrus Elliott. To them five children were born - four daughters and one son - three of whom two daughters and a son, survive her. On August 14, 1876, she was married to Mr. Granville P. Campbell and was to him a faithful and loving wife until death claimed her. Mr. Campbell is left alone at the age of 72, but his trust is in Him who knows all and can sympathize with him in his deep grief.
    Mrs. Campbell became a Christian at the age of 15 and was identified with the United Brethren in Christ. She was a faithful and devoted member so long as she was identified with them. In 1863 under the labors of Rev. John Brazelton, she became a member of the Christian church at Queensville. Here, as elsewhere, she was ever ready for every good word and work until the Lord called her from labor to rest, from Earth's ceaseless toils to Heaven's perpetual rewards. She lived a most worthy and consistent life-always loyal to the Word of God and her convictions of right. She was one of the Lord's noblest women. Her devotion, piety and industry were in every way exemplary and commendable.
    Farewell, dear sister, farewell till we meet again. Neal S. McCallum.

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