Jackson Ballard
Jackson Ballard and his family lived in Lost River Township. He was a Union Civil War soldier with Co I, 24th Regiment of Indiana Volunteers, enlisting January 9, 1861. He served three years and re-enlisted. He returned on leave March 17, 1864, and also had orders to search for another Martin County soldier who had failed to return from leave. Martin County was home to a group of Southern sympathizers known as the "Knights Of The Golden Circle". Ballard was murdered by members of the KGC early in the morning of March 18, 1864, 1/4 mile from his home. In 1888, several men were charged with and tried for Ballard's murder.
Cathy Clark, whose great grandmother was Jackson Ballard's sister, has assembled for her own use, a collection of newspaper stories and other information regarding Ballard's military service, his murder, and the resulting trial 24 years later. This compilation remains the property of Cathy Clark and may not be reproduced in any public media without permission.

Copyright Cathy Clark

Jackson Edgar Ballard  was born on 12 Apr 1832 in Indiana. He died on 18 Mar 1864 in Martin County, Shoals or Natchez, IN.  He was murdered by The Knights of the Golden Circle (Southern Sympathizers). He was buried in Walker Johnson Cemetery, Martin County, Rusk, Indiana 

All items, articles typed as written with mispellings, incorrect names/information.
 1850 Census - 5 October 1850 - Columbia Township, Martin County Indiana - age given as 18, birth Indiana.  Living with parents, William and Nancy Ballard. 

Served in Co I. 24th Reg. Indiana Infantry
Rank in Private, Rank out Corporal
Shot by assassins in Martin County, Indiana.


 The Indianapolis Daily Journal
9 August 1861

The regiment now at Camp Knox, the 24th regiment of Indiana Volunteers, it is understood will go West, probably to Jefferson City, Mo., and there drill until they are prepared to go into service. They will remain in camp here until they are armed, as the Governor will not permit the volunteers of Indiana to go out of the State unarmed.
In all probability there will be another regiment encamped at the same place in which the 24th are now stationed, as this is the best place for a rendezvous for the West, and it appears there will be no more troops marched East, for the present, at least.-Vincennes Gazette.


 The Evansville Daily Journal
15 April 1862
List of Killed and Wounded in the 24th Indiana,
Col. A.P. Hovey

Lt Col John A Gerber killed, Capt Saml F. McGaffin co I killed, Lieut Stephen H Southwick co B killed,  2nd Lieut Fred T Butler co B wounded slightly, 2nd Lieut Saml M Smith co D severely, Capt Nelson F Bolton co D slightly, Acting Major Wm T Spicely slightly, Corporal Z J Tate co B slightly, Charles H Clark  co B killed, N V Huddleson co B wounded slightly, Richard Organ co B slightly, Serg Ditmar Fisher co C slightly, Thos O'Bryne co C severely, Jas Lytle co C severely, Corp Jas G Carnahanco D slightly, Thomas Hyatt co D severely, Lenson Johnson co D slightly, Jesse J Lucas co D do, Jas Cullen co D do, Jos Coleman co D do, John Rudolph co E do, Lindsay Taylor co E do, Serg John F Crisp co F do, Corp Thomas J McClure co F do, Jos A Jewett co F severely, Serg Perry D Kimbley co Gslightly, Jos S Dean co G severely, Preston Teagarden co G do, Wm Quarterman co G do, Win Burnham co G slightly, Wm Wright co G do, Thomas G Glover co G do, Jas Webb co G do, Caspar Colhepp, co H killed, Thos Bryant co H wounded severely, Wm H Dawson co H slightly, James Sullivan co H do, Cor Robt Owen co I severely, J Sherman co I do, J J Miller co I do, Jackson Ballard co I do, Thos J co I do, Corporal Jas T Steele co I slightly, Peter Pierce co I do, Benjamin F Milburn co K severely, Gears co K do. B F Lister co K slightly; Peter Young co K do, D Conley co A. missing. Total 5 killed, 43 wounded and 1 missing.


 The Indianapolis Daily Journal
17 April 1862
List of Killed and Wounded in Indiana Regiments

24TH REGIMENT.

Lt. Col. John A Gerber, Capt. Saml F. McGaffin, CO. I, Lieut. Stephen II. South wick, co. B, Chas. H. Clark, co. B, Caspar Colhepp, co. H, killed 2d Lieut. Fred. T. Butler, co. B, Capt. Nelson, F. Bolton, co. D, Acting Major Wm. T. Spicely, N.V. Huddleson, co. B,'R. Organ, co. B, Sergeant Ditmar Fisher, co. C, Corporal Jas. G. Carnham, co. D, L. Johnson, CO. D, Sergeant Perry D Kimbly, co. G, Wm. Burnham, co. G, Wm. H. Dawson, co. H,  Corporal Jas. T. Steele, co. I, B. F. Lister, co. K, Wm. Wright, co. G, Thomas G. Glover, co. G, Jas. Webb, co. G, James Sullivan, co. H, Jesse J . Lucas, co. D, Jas. Cullen co. D, Jos. Coleman, co. D, John Randolph, co. E, Lindsay Taylor, co. E, Sergeant John F. Crisp, co. F, Corporal Thos. J. McClure, co. F, Peter Young, CO. K, wounded slightly; 2nd Lieut. Sam. M. Smith, co. D, Thos. O'Bryne, co. C, Jas. Lytic, co. C, Thos. Hyatt, co. D, Jos. A. Jewett, CO. F, Jos. S. Dean, co. G, Preston Teagarden, co. G, Wm. Quarterman, co. G, T. Bryant, co. H, Corporal Robert J. Owen, co. I, J . 
Sherman, co. I, J.J. Miller, co. I, Jackson Ballard, co. I, Benjamin F. Milburn, co. K, wounded severely D. Conley, co. A, missing. Total-5 killed, 43 wounded and 1 missing.


 1863 -  3 March 1863 - Listed one after the other with Francis and James, in Consolidated list of all persons of Class 3 who were in service of the United States in 1st Congressional District.  Listed as married farmer,residence Lost River , Martin Indiana, born Indiana, 24th Indiana Infantry.


 The Indianapolis Daily Journal
27 May 1863

Indiana Losses at the Battle of Magnolia

TWENTY-FOURTH INDIANA

Killed - Co C, JoShua Lindell; Co D, Jackson Edwards; Co F, Wm H Jesser; Co I, Asa Evans, Francis Ballard. Total 5
Wounded - Co I - WS Waller, Abram Perkins, Thos J Hawkee, Joseph Street, John Mackey, Jackson Ballard


The Evansville Daily Journal
Thursday, 4 June 1863

Headquarters, 24th Ind. Inf't'y.
Port Gibson, Miss. May 4.

Sir: I would respectfully report the following list of killed, wounded and missing, from my command in the battle near Port Gibson, May 1st, 1863.
Killed - corp Joshua Lindell, co C; Jackson Edwards, co D; William H. Jessee, co F; Asa Evans, co I; Francis Ballard, co I.
Severely Wounded -  Jared Erwin, co A; Francis M McPike, co A; William L. Waller, sergt, co I; Abraham Perkins, co I; Thomas Hawke, co I; Jos Street, co I.
Slightly Wounded -  Sergeant Van B Kelly, co A; sergt John Cabassis, co C; William Hillman, co C; Jas A. Smiley, co F; Charles Miller, co F: 1st Lieut. James J. Jones, co H; Pavil Tislow, co H; Elvis L. Coon, co H; John Mackey, co I; Jackson Ballard, co I; Peter Gray, co K; John Watkins, co K.

Recapitulation.
Killed - 5
Wounded - 18

Very Respectfully, W.T. Spicely
Col. Com'd. 24th Ind. Vols.


 The Rochester Daily Republican
3 March 1888

LEFT OVER FROM THE WAR.
Ex-Knights of the Golden Circle Arrested in Indiana for Murder.

VINCENNES, Ind., March 3.-Intense excitement prevails in Shoals, Ind., over the arrest of John G. Jones, county commissioner; Mr. Stanfield, and James Arthur for the murder of Jack Ballard twenty-four years ago.  Albert Qualkinbush turned state's evidence.
Ballard came back to the county during the war to arrest a deserter, and, it is said, the above parties belonged to the Knights of the Golden Circle.  At a meeting of the order Stanfield said Ballard had to be killed.  Jones and Qualkinbush protested, and said they would do all they could to prevent it.  Just then Ballard came up and Stanfield shot him with a gun.  He then took Ballard's revolver and fired five shots into the body. Stone, another man implicated, then said: '' _____ him!  I'll finish him!" and fired another shot into the body of the dead man.
John G. Jones is out on $1,000 bail. Stanfield and Archer are in jail, and Stone who resides near Olney, Ills., it is said, will be arrested.


 The Boston Herald
5 March 1888

AN OLD CRIME REVEALED.
Four Men Indicted for a Murder Committed in 1864.
(Special Dispatch to the Boston Herald)

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., March 4, 1888. The indictment of four men and the arrest of two in Newton county, for the murder of another named Jack Ballard, forms the sequel to one of the terrible political crimes committed in Southern Indiana during the time of the civil war.  The neighborhood of Jack Ballard's home in Martin county, was the "stamping ground" in which Bowles, Milligan and Horsey figured so conspicuously.  Steve Horsey yet lives in Martin county, and he is frequently seen at the court house of West Shoals. The spot where Ballard was killed is but a few miles from French Lick Springs, which were then owned by Dr. Bowles, and Ballard was a member of company I, 24th Indiana volunteers.  In the spring of 1864 he obtained leave of absence to go home, and was also given instructions to arrest a deserter supposed to be hiding in Lost River township.  His mission was suspected by the Knights of the golden Circle, and a plot was laid to murder him.  It was well carried out, for on the morning of the 18th of March he was shot from ambush just after he had left his house, and was instantly killed.  The rifle shots were distinctly heard by his wife and children. Suspician was directed toward several persons, but, owing to the fact that a large number were in sympathy with the assassins, nothing was done, and the crime went unpunished for a quarter of a century.
Last Thursday an old man named Albert Quackenbush appeared before the grand jury, confessed that he was one of the party that murdered Ballard, and implicated John G. Jones, William Stanfield and James Archer, all of whom have been arrested and are now in the hands of the officers.  Jones is a member of the board of county commissioners and is an elder in the Christian Church.  Archer is a brother to two of the Archers who were lynched at Shoals two years ago, and an uncle to Samuel Archer who was executed July 9, 1886.  Stanfield is the father of the young girl who was murdered a few months ago by Charles Archer, her lover.  Charles is a son of James, and is now in jail at Shoals, charged with Miss Stanfield's murder.  The Archers claim that the girl committed suicide.  She was seduced by Charles Archer.  This trouble between the Stanfield and Archer families created such an ill feeling that Quackenbush, out of revenge and to protect himself, appeared before the grand jury and informed on his accomplices in the murder of Jack Ballard.  He was promised immunity for his confession.


 The Indianapolis News
7 March 1888

Dr. Stone Arrested.

CARMI, Ill., March 7. - In response to a message from Sheriff Genne, of Shoals, Ind., Sheriff Burrell went to Springerton yesterday and arrested Dr. J.W. Stone, who is charged, on the confession of Albert Quackenbush, with complicity in the assassination of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, who was hunting for a man named Anderson, a deserter.  The deed was committed in March, 1864, and, according to Quackenbush's confession, he and Stone were detailed by the Knights of the Golden Circle to make way with Ballard in order to protect Anderson, who was also a brother in the lodge.  The murder was committed, and Quackenbush further stated that a plot was laid to murder all officers serving papers on drafted soldiers.  Several prominent Indiana people who were charged by Quackenbush with complicity in the murder have already been indicted.  Dr. Stone is well know and highly respected in this county, where he has lived for fourteen years.  During this time he has practiced medicine and preached at intervals for the Christian Church, but more recently has connected himself with the church of the Latter Day Saints.  In 1885 he was the Greenback nominee of this district for State Senator.  He disclaims any connection with the crime, and says that when it was committed he was holding a meeting at the residence of David Emmons, in Martin County.


 The Daily Illinois State Journal
Thursday, 8 March 1888

AN OLD CRIME CONFESSED.
The Perpetrators of a Murder Twenty-four Years Ago Finally Revealed.

CARMI, Ill., March 6. - In March, 1864, Jackson Ballard, an officer of the Union army, returned to his home at Shoals, Martin county, Ind., to effect the arrest of a deserter named Anderson.  Two days after reaching home, Ballard was ambushed, and his body riddled with bullets, and for twenty-four years the assassins escaped arrest and punishment.  Today Dr. Stone, a Christian preacher at Enfield, in this county, was arrested for the crime on the confession of an old citizen named Quakenbush, of Shoals. 
John Jones, a county commissioner, James Archer and William Stanfield, old citizens of Shoals were also arrested.  Quakenbush, who confessed, was released on bail, and will testify for the state.  All the others are in jail. 
The confession in substance is as follows;  Anderson, the deserter, was a member of a lodge.  He had the sworn protection of the members, who were determined to defend him.  In additionto this, Ballard threatened to shoot any copperhead on sight.  At this juncture Quakenbush and many others, yet unsuspected of being members of the organization, were notified to meet at once and take immediate steps toward the disposing of Ballard.  At the meeting Jones and Quakenbush were, with reluctance, induced to execute the plot.
"We divided into two posses," said Quakenbush, "each following the main highway that Ballard would travel in search of Anderson.  Not meeting him, we congregated in a thicket almost in sight of his residence, and lay in ambush until he came down the road in plain view, well-armed and ostensibly in search of Anderson.  The order was given by our leader to 'fire.'  Jones' courage failed him, and he handed his weapon to Stanfield.  We fired seven shots into him.  Not yet satisfied, Stone advanced and fired several shots into his prostate form, rendering him almost unrecognizable.  At this juncture we disbanded, and never has the secret, although it has haunted me constantly, been revealed."
He says the scene of the murder has haunted him, and now he feels himself greatly relieved.  The organization referred to was evidently the "Knights of the Golden Circle," yet the confessor is silent on this point.  It is also authentically stated that a diabolical plot had been arranged to murder the officers serving papers on soldiers drafted.  Dr. Stone, who was released today, has been preaching the gospel for fifteen years. 


 The Sullivan Democrat
9 March 1888

MURDER WILL OUT.
Sensational Arrests in Martin County for Murder.

SHOALS, Ind., March 3.-The confession made by Albert Quackenbush of the Ballard murder, committed in March, 1864, is given much credence.
He implicates John Jones, a county commissioner; John Stone, a minister; Wm. Stanfield and James Archer.
All are of good repute, and their arrest was a genuine surprise.  He recites in his confession thatJackson Ballard, whom they murdered, was at home, to effect the arrest of one Andrews, who was a fellow member in their lodge, and was seeking protection from them.  Ballard openly threatened to shoot any butternut, as he called them, on sight. This incited Stanfeld and his accomplices to immediate action.
A midnight meeting was held and it was decided with much reluctance to shoot Ballard, and a diabolical plot was formed. He and his four accomplices with other abettors, secreted themselves in a thicket near his residence, and when he first appeared, fired seven shots, and to complete the work Stone shot him after he had fallen. They covered their crime completely. The county was scoured but no clue. The Knights of the Golden Circle had done their work well. This tended to strengthen their organization.He alleges that neither himself nor Jones did the firing, although present. They also attempted to thwart the efforts of an officer who was serving papers on soldiers drafted. They were arrested to-day. Archer and Stanfield, in default of bond, were jailed. Jones is out on $10,000 bail. Stone lives near Olney. Illinois. There are many abettors in the crime, which will be dealt with soon.
Archer is a brother to two and an uncle of one of the notorious trio who were lynched here in 1886. His son also rests under an indictment for another murder. Excitement runs high, and it is feared that some of the accused may be served with mob violence.


The Sullivan Democrat
Friday, 9 March 1888

Rev. Stone Arrested.

CARMI, Ill.,March 6.- In response to a telegram received from Sheriff Yenne, of Shoals, Ind., Sheriff Burrel yesterday evening arrested Dr. J. W. Stone of Springton.  In Sunday's papers appeared a dispatch from Shoals, stating that Albert Quackenbush had confessed that himself and Stone, by the command of the Golden Circle, had murdered, in March, 1864, Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, who was hunting for one Anderson, a deserter.
Rev. Stone says that he was born in Kentucky in 1840; that he moved to near Shoals when he was 23, and preached for the Christian church, practiced medicine there and at Uniontown two years. He then moved to Jeffersonville, Ill.  Recently he has connected himself with the Latter-day Saints. He says he will not wait for a requisition, as he is anxious to go back and prove his innocence.
When the crime was committed he says he was holding services at the residence of David Emmons and never knew the murdered man, Ballard. In 1880 he was the Greenback nominee for state senator from this district.  The doctor has many friends who believe him innocent and will advance money to help him become a free man again.


 
The Omaha Daily World
9 March 1888

CHARGED WITH MURDER.
A Minister Arrested for a Crime Committed Twenty-four Years Ago. (Typed as written)

CARMI, Ill., March 9 -  In response to a message from Sheriff Genne, of Shoals, Ind., Sheriff Burrell went to Springerton last evening and arrested Dr. J. W. Stone, who is charged, on the confession of Albert Quackenbush, of Shoals with complicity in the assasination of Jackson Ballard, a union soldier, who was hunting for a man named Anderson, a deserter.  The deed was committed in March 1864, and, according to Quackenbush's confession, ha and Stone were detailed by the Knights of the Golden Circle to make way with Ballard in order to protect Anderson, who was also a brother in the lodge.  The murder was committed and Quackenbush further states that a diabolical plot was laid out to murder all officers serving papers on drafted soldiers.
Dr. Stone is well known and highly respected in this county where he has lived for fourteen years.  During this time he has practiced medicine and preached at intervals for the Christian Church, but more recently has connected himself with the church of the Latter Day Saints.  In 1885 he was the greenback nominee of this district for state senator.  He disclaimed any connection with the crime, and says that when it was committed he was holding a meeting at the residence of David Emmons in Martin county. 
He says he knew all the persons mentioned above except Quackenbush and Ballard; that since leaving that neighborhood he has been back three times, twice to hold meetings.The prisoner is 48 years old, is heavy set, fleshy, wears a heavy gray beard and mustache, and is slightly bald.  He was born in Kentucky, moved with his parents to within eight miles of Shoals when hewas 23 years old.  He lived there one year, moved to Monroe county, thence to Jeffersonville, Ill., where he preached and published The Christian Instructor.  He then moved to Crossville, and then to Springertown, this county.  He is an intelligent, well read man.  His friends believe him innocent and will not allow him to go to jail, but are paying the officers to guard him.  He says he will not wait for a requisition, but is ready to go back at once.


 The Odon Weekly Journal
10 March 1888

MURDER WILL OUT
The Murder of Jack Ballard of Martin County Exposed.

Sunday Democrat.
Twenty -five years ago, Jack Ballard, a member of Co. I, 24th Ind. Vol., was sent to Lost River township, Martin county to arrest a man who had deserted from the company.  Shortly after the arrival of Ballard in the wilds of Lost River, he was murdered in cold blood.  The most searching investigation was made by the officials of Martin county, but the murder of Jack Ballard remained a mystery.
Lost River township is semi-barbaric.  It was the home of the infamous Archer gang and confederates, and it's dark history is stained with crimes innumerable, many of which will probably never reach the light of justice.  The township is poor and lawless inhabited by some of the worst outlaws of Indiana, and it's wealth, if it has any, is not apparent, the ten leading citizens of the township listing for taxation only eleven dollars' worth of personal property each, on average.
Sometime during the past week, Albert Quackenbush, an old man of sixty years, appeared before the grand jury of Martin county, and made a confession of the most startling nature.  He stated that himself, John S. Jones, William Stanfield, James Archer and John Stone were the murderers of Jack Ballard. 
John S. Jones is a County Commissioner, an elder of the Christian Church, and a prominent farmer.  He was arrested and placed under $10,000 bond for his appearance.  James Archer is the father of Charles Archer, who is under arrest for the murder of his sweet heart, and a quarrel having been generated between James Archer and old man Quackenbush, it is supposed the latter confessed to the murder of Ballard in order to forestall any such action on the part of Archer.  James Archer and Quackenbush are both in the Martin county jail, failing to give bond, and William Stanfield is keeping them company.  John Stone has been living in Illinois for several years and officers have gone to arrest him. The confession of Quackenbush has again stirred Martin county to it's profoundest depths, and there is no telling what a night may bring forth.  It is hoped, however that the fair name of Southern Indiana will not be again stained by the vengeance of a mob law.


The Daviess County Democrat
Saturday, 10 March 1888

REVERAND J.W. STONE
THE ILLINOIS AUTHORITIES FIND A LATTER-DAY-SAINT
Who is Wanted at Shoals on a Charge of Complicity in the Murder of Jack Ballard - Telegram Giving an Account of Dr. Stone in Illinois.

A correspondant of the Vincennes Commercial writing from Olney, Ill. says: " There has been some inquiry here about the man named Stone, living near Olney charged with complicity of the murder of Jack Ballard, twenty-four years ago.  He does not live near Olney and never did; but there was a man, by the name of Stone who moved from Martin county, Indiana, (near Shoals) about 1871 or '72, to Edwards county, Illinois.
He preached in Olney and at other points.  About 1874 he moved to White county, and preached, and also practiced medicine.  He was afterwards silenced from preaching, on account of not practicing what he preached, and a rumor was reported at the time that he had killed a Union Soldier.  He still practiced medicine, when sober.  About that time, being somewhat a politician, he entered the race on the Greenback ticket for Representative, but was defeated. After that he joined, the Mormons and went to preaching Mormonism.  He was back to this (Richland) county two or three times, after embracing the Mormon faith.  But, for two years past, nothing has been heard from him."

LATER.
Elder Stone, who was charged by old man Quackenbush with being one of the murderers of Jack Ballard, in Martin county, in 1864, has been found at Carmi Ill.  A telegram from Carmi, last Tuesday says, "In response to a telegram received from Sheriff Yenne, of Shoals, Ind. , Sheriff Burrell yesterday evening arrested Dr. J. W. Stone, of Springton.  In Sunday's papers appeared a dispatch from Shoals, stating that Albert Quackenbush, had confessed that himself and Stone, by the command of the Knights of the Golden Circle, had murdered, in March, 1864, Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, who was hunting for one Anderson, a deserter.  The dispatches located Stone at Enfield, in this county.  Sheriff Burrell sent a message of inquiry to Shoals and received reply to arrest and hold Stone for requisition.  In conversation with the Republican's correspondent the prisoner stated that he was born in Kentucky, in 1840, that he moved to near Shoals when he was twenty-three, preached for the Christian church and practiced medicine there and at Uniontown two years.  He then moved to Jeffersonville, III., and published the Christian Instructor and preached there and at Olney one year.  Afterwards he went to Crossville and then located in Springton this county.He graduated at a Cincinnati medical college in 1877.  Recently he has connected himself with the Latterday Saints.  He says he will not wait for a requisition, as he is anxious to go back and prove his innocence. When the  crime was committed he says he was holding services at the residence of David Emmons and never knew the murdered man Ballard.  In 1880 he was the Greenback nominee for state senator from this district.  The doctor has many friends who believe him innocent and will advance money to help him become a free man again.


 The Indianapolis News
Tuesday, 13 March 1888

Dr. Stone of Greyville, Ill., has been arrested as one of Jack Ballard's murderers.  He was formerly a Christian minister but later a disciple of the Latter Day Saints.  He is confined in jail at Shoals.  Stone was Adjutant General in the Knights of the Golden Circle and with Ballard's own pistol put a bullet through the poor victims head after he was dead.  Jones, the County Commissioner, has been admitted to $10,000 and is out.  He was one of the Coroner's jury at the inquest and returned a verdict of "death by parties unknown."  James Archer is in jail.  He has had two brothers and two nephews hanged, one nephew shot, one nephew out of the House of Corrections and one out of the penitentiary on parol of honor, one son in the penitentiary and one son in jail on a charge of murder.  He is now confined with Stanfield, the father of his son's victim, each on a charge of murder.  It is understood that Judge Heffron will order a special term immediately at the close of the present one to try the cases, as the next regular sitting will be in September. - (Paoli Republican)


 
The Petersburg Pike County Democrat
Thursday, 15 March 1888

Archer, Stanfield, Ballard, and Quackenbush
Martin county has for a long time been the scene of the most lawless murders.  The readers of the Democrat remember that Chas. Archer killed Miss Standfield not long since - a lady whose ruin he had affected.  This murder, it seems, has been the means of revealing the circumstances attending the murder of Jack Ballard which occurred 23 years ago.  Wm Quackenbush is a brother of Quackenbush of Martin county who went before the grand jury a few days ago and confessed to having been connected with the murder of Ballard 23 years ago. Wm. Quackenbush said that he believed there is truth in his brother's confession, and gives as a reason for the confession that he does it out of the interest he has in Miss Standfield, his niece. The explanation is plausable, for Chas Archer's father is implicated in the murder of Ballard, and this implication is of course, a means of getting even with the family.Wm. Quackenbush has always been a quiet good citizen, and has been esteemed by the citizens of this (Washington) township. Has held office, performed his duty, and we can assure him that the citizens who know him sympathize with him in the trouble his brother brings upon him. Albert Quackenbush, the
confessor, implicates besides himself, John G. Jones, Wm. Standfield, and Jas. Archer, charging them with the murder of Jack Ballard.  Jas. Archer is the father of Chas. Archer who murdered Miss Standfield, Quackenbush's niece.


 The Bedford Lawrence Mail
15 March 1888

AFTER MANY YEARS

The neighborbood in Martin and Orange counties, near Shoals, that for more than twenty-five years has borne a reputation for lawlessness and blood that is second to none other in Indiana, and which was the home of the infamous Archer gang of robbers and cutthroats, has again drawn the attention of the country.
The 18th day of the present month will be the 24th anniversary of one of the cruelest murders that was ever recorded in the criminal annals of Southern Indiana.  The victim was Jack Ballard, a Union soldier, member of Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry.In 1864, early in the spring, the regiment to which Jack Ballard belonged was stationed at Evansville.
Ballard's home was in Colombia township Martin county, where his wife and children anxiously waited for the day that would return the soldier husband and father to them.While in camp at Evansville it was learned that a deserter from the regiment had returned to Lost River township, in Martin county, and Ballard obtained permission to visit his home and arrest, if possible, the deserter.
Accordingly, a few days before the fateful l8th of March, Jack Ballard set out for his home with a light heart. He arrived in due time, and there was much rejoicing in the little home over the return of the soldier boy.The vicinity of Lost River township in Martin county and French Lick Springs, in Orange, was then one of the greatest hot-beds of secession in the North.  The infamous stories of the secret plotting of the gang that is said to have been commanded by the famous trio, Bowles, Milligen and Horsey, are yet fresh in the minds of the people of this part of the State. The disloyal band reigned supreme in the neighhorhood of Jack Ballard's home.
It is supposed that Ballard's mission was suspected by the friends of the deserter, and a plan was concocted to murder him.  It was agreed that he be shot from ambush, and on the morning of March 18, 1864, he was fired upon just after he had left his home and instantly killed.  The rifleshots which killed the brave fellow were heard at his home.
Persons known to be implicated with the disloyal organization of the Knights of the Golden Circle were suspected of the crime, but so carefully had the plan been laid that no clew could be secured. This was aided by the fact that so many of the population were either in league or in sympathy with the murderers.After nearly a quarter of a century has elapsed the assassination of Ballard seems in a fair way to be avenged.
Some of his alleged slayers are already in the toils of the law and officers are looking for others.
On Thursday, Feb. 23, the Grand Jury of Martin county returned a bill against Albert Quackenbush, John G. Jones, Wm. Stanfield and Jas. Archer, charging them with the murder of the soldier. Warrants for their arrest were immediately issued, and Friday the Sheriff brought in Jones and Archer.James Archer is a brother to old Tom Archer and Mart Archer who, with young John Archer, Tom's son, were hanged by a mob in Shoals two years ago this month.  Archer is also an uncle to Sam Archer, who was executed by the Sheriff of Martin county on the 9th of July, 1886, for the murder of Sam Bunch, in which he and his three relatives who were lynched and John Lynch participated. Lynch is now in the Prison South.
Stanfield is the father of the young girl who is alleged to have been murdered by her lover, Charles Archer, a few months ago. Charles Archer is a son of James Archer.  It is said he first seduced and then murdered Miss Stanfield.  Archer claims that the girl committed suicide.  Anyhow, he is now in jail charged with her murder.
As might be expected the trouble between the Stanflelds and Archers brought about by the murder or suicide whichever it was, of the Stanfield girl is very bitter, and it is claimed that this trouble caused old man Quackenbush to appear before the Grand Jury and tell there, in consideration of immunity for himself, the story, so long buried in the secret hearts of the assassins, of the murder of Jack Ballard.  It is said that a man named Stone, who now lives in Illinois, is also implicated in the Ballard murder.Ballard's widow and his children still live in the place they did when he was killed.-Washington Gazette.


 
The Indianapolis Journal
21 March 1888

All Over The State

James Archer, the Rev. John Stone, John G. Jones and William Stanfield of Shoals who stand indicted for waylaying and murdering Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier then at home on furlough, March 18, 1864, were required to furnish bonds for their appearance, and all save Jones were remanded to jail, he being released on $10,000 bond.  Charles Archer, son of the first-mentioned, is charged with murdering the daughter of Stanfield.  The last-mention was also remanded to jail in default of bail.  Messrs. Clark and Dobbins, who will defend the whole gang, prevailed on Judge Hefron for an early trial, whereupon the judge adjourned the matter until May 21, when an exciting trial is anticipated.


The Indianapolis News
Friday, 25 May 1888

MURDER WILL OUT.
STARTLING TALE OF CONSPIRACY

SHOALS, Ind., May 24. "Murder will out" receives another forcible illustration in romantic but blood-stained Martin County, where Wm. Stanfield and Dr. John Stone are in jail and John G. Jones and James Archer under $10,000 bond, charged with the murder of Jack Ballard, on March 18, 1864.  They are all men of good to high standing, Jones being a County Commissioner, having enjoyed unquestioned esteem for many years which does not altogether fail him now, as almost every business man in Shoals offered to go on his bond when he was indicted. 
The story of the Ballard murder and how the confession came about, fixing the charge upon these men, is very interesting.  One of the attorneys in the case states that for years suspicions of the killing attached to the parties charged with it, yet no evidence could be found upon which to base an indictment. 
But in November, 1887, Anna, daughter of Wm. Stanfield, was killed and her former sweetheart, Charles, son of James Archer, was charged with the murder. He had a preliminary trial before Justice Gruber, of Lost River Township, and was aquitted, but will again be tried before the June term of the Martin County Court.  This gave rise to a feud between the Archer and Stanfield families and criminations and recriminations took place until the entire township was filled with talk.  James H. Ballard, cousin of the murdered man, heard of it and went to Albert Quakenbush who was suspected of complicity in the murder.  He told him that he had better turn State's evidence and save himself, as the whole matter would be blown.  Quakenbush went before the grand jury at the February term and made a full confession; indictments were returned and the men arrested.
Dr. Stone, who was practicing medicine in White County, Illinois, came without requisition and stayed without guard until placed in jail.  The murder of Ballard, as will be seen from the dates, was committed during the troublous times of the war, and Quakenbush's confession connects it with the wrought-up feeling of that time in a highly sensational manner.
Jack Ballard was a private in Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteers, and was sent home by Captain John Marley, now dead, to arrest one Allen Anderson, a deserter.  His home was in a lonely, wild part of Lost River Township, and not far from Anderson's in fact.  All the supposed actors in the tragedy lived within a distance of not more than four miles.  Ballard, instead of attending strictly to business, went about the country threatening to "kill some copperheads" before he returned South, arousing a very bitter feeling against himself.
Now, Quakenbush charges that on the day and night preceding the murder a gathering, of which Dr. Stone was alleged the leader, was held in an abandoned cabin within half a mile of Ballard's home, members going and coming at various time.  No direct reference was made to killing Ballard.  Toward morning a committee of two was sent to find out whether Ballard was home.  They found his horse and saddle in the stable, and so reported.  The gathering then broke up, divided into parties of six or eight each, and ambushed the road leading from Ballard's home on the east side.  After a short wait, about daylight, Ballard was noticed coming cautiously along the road.  They let him come until he was opposite one of the parties, then Wm. Stanfield stepped into the road, lifted his gun and simultaneously with him four others shot, Ballard falling, pierced with bullets.  Quakenbush says that Stanfield then took the fallen man's pistol and shot him several times.  The body, when found, bore seven bullet wounds. 
The party then dispersed.  It consisted, according to the confession, of Wm. Stanfield, Dr. Stone, James Archer, John G. Jones, the men now under indictment, Quakenbush, himself, David Emmons, Stringer and Shield - the latter three now dead.  He claims that Stanfield, Shields and Stringer did the shooting.
Ballard evidently feared the fate which overtook him, for two comrades had been with him, at his request the previous evening, in his search for Anderson, and only left him on seeing him safely home.  They are Messrs. Pierce and Ritchie, of Shoals.  Anderson, whom Ballard tried to arrest, fled to Canada, where his family followed, and has not been heard of since.
The murder was followed by lawless vengeance.  Soldiers arrested men, and by means of torture attempted to extort confessions, but failed.  A man named Holt was hung up until his friends rescued him with difficulty.  Dr. Stone, then a preacher in the Christian Church, was arrested by soldiers while holding a religious meeting at David Emmons' the night following the murder, but slipped away through a back door and hid in the bushes until the were gone, saying he had no desire to be hung without trial.
The most startling part of the alleged confession is that Quakenbush says the midnight convention in the lonely ruined cabin was a meeting of the Knights of the Golden Circle, but well informed men thoroughly discredit this, and say there was no such organization in Martin County.  It might have been that a few men in the region belonged to that mystical organization, but not many, though Steven Horsey, of Shoals, and Wm. Bowles, of French Lick, were accused and condemned by court martial on such a charge and only saved by the decision of the Supreme Court, that a court martial had no jurisdiction in a peaceful State.
It is conceded that two secret political organizations existed - one called the Circle of Honor, the other, the Union League. A copy of the constitution and bylaws of the former is in possession of a prominent gentleman at Shoals.  The members took an oath to support the constitutions of the United States and the State, to assist in the enforcement of the laws and to drive out of the State all armed guerrilla bands, which might enter it.  While opposed to arrest for political reasons, they would use no force to resist them, lest it might have a tendency to interfere with the efforts of the Government to put down the Rebellion and possibly produce a counter- revolution in the West.
If the prosecution attempts to make political capital out of the trial, the defense will use the law and regulations of the Circle of Honor to prove that it was loyal, and not organized to resist drafts or for other treasonable purposes.  It will also deny that the accused had anything to do with the murder, and advance the theory that Anderson, other deserters and Quakenbush did it, and claims to be able to prove alibis for all the accused.  The prosecution, however, claims to have a great surprise in store in the way of witnesses who saw the accused going and coming.
The tendency of the case so far has been, to run into politics, and it is to be feared that it may give rise to further feuds and violence.  Public interest is thoroughly aroused.


 
15 June 1888
A Family Of Criminals.

SHOALS, Ind. June 15. - The trial of Charles Archer for the alleged murder of Anna Belle Stanfield is proceeding in court, with Judge Heffner presiding.  Archer is a member of the notorious Archer family, three of whom were hanged by a mob two years ago, and one by the law.  He is a son of Jim Archer, now awaiting in jail to be tried next week for the murder of Jackson Ballard in 1864.  The only other members of the family are serving sentences in the penitentiary.  It is alleged that he shot and killed his sweetheart after first seducing her.  Much excitement prevails, while the courtroom is crowded with people at all times.  The defendant is only sixteen years old.


The Indianapolis Journal
23 June 1888

The Alleged Murders of Ballard
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, June 22 - Wm. Stanfield and John Stone, in jail for the murder of Jack Ballard, in March, 1864, were today brought, on a writ of habeas corpus, before Judge Hefron.
Their bail had been set at  $10,000 but, after hearing the case, the court set their bail at $4,000.  They have been in jail since their arrest, in March, being unable to give the required bail Stone is a resident of Illinois, while Stanfield is a resident of this county.  Their trial is set for September.


The Bedford Lawrence Mail
6 July 1888

Dr. Stone and Wm. Stanfield, charged with the murder of Jack Ballard, were taken before Judge Heffron, at Shoals, a few days since, on a writ of habeas corpus. Their bail was reduced from $10,000 to $4,000, which being furnished released the prisoners.
Their case is set for the September term, when we hope tardy justice will be meted out to all the guilty parties. Jack Ballard, a true Union soldier, was nobler than ten thousand wretches like the rebel sympathizers who killed him. Let his murder be avenged.- Paoli Republican July 4.


The Indianapolis Journal
Thursday, 6 September 1888

Sensational Murder Trial.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, Sept 5. - The trial of the celebrated Ballard murder case began in the Martin Circuit Court today.  This is a case that has more sensational features in it than any other murder case that has ever been tried in Indiana.
It is the case of the State against Wm. Stanfield, farmer;  Jno. G. Jones, county comissioner; Jas. Archer, farmer, and Rev. Jno. Stone, a minister of the Christian Church. These men, it is alleged by the prosecution were members of the Knights of the Golden Circle during the war, and they are accused of the murder of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, on March 18, 1864.  One of their number, Albert Quackenbush, turned State's evidence and is one of the prosecuting witnesses. 
There was a great crowd in attendance today.  The jury was impaneled and twelve young men selected.  The defense is represented by Judge Gardiner, C. S. Dobbins and Clark & McCormick; the State by Brooks, Stephens & Mosier.  The case will be fought energetically on both sides.


 
The New York Herald Tribune
7 September 1888

THE MURDER OF JACKSON BALLARD
KNIGHTS OF THE GOLDEN CIRCLE ON TRIAL IN INDIANA FOR KILLING A VOLUNTEER

Vincennes, Ind., Sept. 6 (Special). - The celebrated Ballard murder case is now on trial in the Martin County Court, at Shoals, Indiana.  Jack Ballard was a Union soldier, who was murdered in March 18, 1864.  He came home on a furlough, in search of a deserter.  The Knights of the Golden Circle, it is charged, plotted his death.  On the day in question he was waylaid and shot.  He had made himself obnoxious by tearing down the butternut stars that were used by the Knights as signals.  This secret has been kept for twenty-four years.  A few months ago the murder of a young girl, Belle Stanfield occurred.  She was killed, it was supposed, by her lover, Charles Archer, who was tried for the crime and aquitted.  The community in which Archer and Miss Stanfield lived was greatly worked up over the murder.  The Ballard affair, which had passed in silence for almost a quarter of a century, was revived.  One of the Knights of the Golden Circle, fearful of the result to himself, Albert Quackenbush, went before the grand jury and had four men indicted for the murder of Jackson Ballard.  Those indicted were the most prominent men in the community: William Stanfield, a farmer, John G. Jones, Commissioner of Martin County; the Rev. John Stone, a Christian preacher living in White County, Ill.: James Archer, a farmer, and Quackenbush himself.  Quackenbush made a complete confession.  Mrs. Ballard went on the stand this afternoon and testified that her husband was murdered in broad daylight on the morning of March 18, 1864 about 200 yards from his home, while in search of a deserter from the Union army.  An organized body of men laid in ambush for him and riddled him with bullets.


 The Indianapolis Journal
Friday, 7 September 1888

A War-Day Crime Recalled
The Murder of Jackson Ballard by a Party of Knights of the Golden Circle
How the Crime Was at Last Revealed Through a Second Murder and the Criminals Arrested - Story Told by Ballard's Widow

Special to the Indianapolis Journal.
Shoals, Ind., Sept. 6.  The people of this town and surrounding country have manifested great interest in the trial of Rev. John W. Stone, Commissioner John G. Jones, Albert Quackenbush, Wm. Stanfield and James Archer, charged with the murder of Jackson Ballard, twenty-four years ago, and the unusual character of the case and the social standing of most of the accused have excited the attention of people far and near.  The trial has been postponed from one court to another until those concerned became excited as to the outcome.  After a great deal of maneuvering, those charged with the murder were released from jail under heavy bond.  This provoked a great deal of talk on account of the peculiar circumstances attending the murder of Ballard.
More than a year ago, Anna Belle Stanfield, daughter of William Stanfield. one of those charged with the murder of Ballard, was shot and killed.  Charles Archer, her lover, was accused of murdering her for the purpose of hiding her shame, and arrested and tried.  As the two lovers were alone when the tragedy occurred, young Archer's story that she shot herself could not be disproved, and he was set free.But while his case was pending a great deal of ill feeling was engendered between the neighbors over the affair, and much loud talk was indulged in, and some threats of direful revelations were made.  Albert Quackenbush feared that it would lead up to a disclosure of the Ballard murder, and with a pricking conscience he went to H. E Wells, proprietor of the French Lick Springs, and made a complete confession of the awful tragedy enacted in the early morning twenty-four years before.
To forestall all the damaging statements that he feared would be made against himself, he told the story first.  He feared the evidence in the trial of Charles Archer would reveal his long-kept secret.  Then Quackenbush went to James Ballard, son of the murdered man, and narrated the awful story of the killing of his father.  The terrible tale was out now, and Quackenbush was advised to go before the grand jury and tell all about the affair. He did so, and as a consequence the four men already named were arrested and imprisoned.  Through the efforts of friends they were released on bonds, after a time.Their trial came up again at this term of the Martin Circuit Court.  They were arraigned for trial yesterday.  The courtroom was crowded with eager spectators.  Fifty witnesses were summoned to appear at the trial.  Both State and defendants have a large array of legal talent.
The men charged with the murder of Ballard were all present  They seemed to be quite composed under the dreadful ordeal of a trial for life, and sat with their counsel before the judge and jury simply like interested spectators.
Wm. Stanfield is a man who has the appearance of a farmer, past middle life.  He has dark hair and eyes, a sunburt face, of medium stature and build, and an eye deeply sunk in his head.  John G. Jones, county commissioner, is a slightly-built man of medium stature, a bright black eye, dark hair, and a long dark mustache.  He has a general air of refinement and intelligence about him that was not observed in the others.  James Archer is of medium stature, slender, long dark hair, a wavering eye, bushy whiskers, low forehead, and a sickly look.  Rev. J. W. Stone is heavy set, rather below a medium stature, a low, bald, retreating forehead, long gray mustache and chin-whiskers, feeble gray eyes.  He constantly twists his mustache nervously.  Albert Quackenbush, the man who demonstrated the truth of the statement that murder will out, is rather mediocre in general appearance, above the ordinary stature and build, small thin whiskers that are now gray, long gray hair, deep-set, tearful-looking eyes, and withal a benevolent air.  He seems weighted with a terrible spot that will not out.
A motion was made on the part of the State to quash the indictment as against Quackenbush, as he would be used in evidence in the trial, and the motion was sustained.  Following this, yesterday, T. J. Brooks, one of the counsel for the State, appeared before the jury and made a statement of the case as they would prove in the course of the trial. As usual, Mr. Brooks recited what the jury would be expected to do in the case, and then proceeded to tell the following harrowing story:
"March 18, 1864, Jackson Ballard was murdered in this county.  He was a soldier, but that cuts little figure in the case.  It only goes to show how he was murdered.  Ballard had been at home a short time before, on a veteran furlough, earned by re-enlisting in the army. While his company was rendezvousing at Evansville a comrade, a neighbor, had deserted from his company.  Ballard was sent to arrest Anderson two weeks after he had reported for duty from hisveteran furlough.  He got off the train here in Shoals in the early morning, got a horse and went to his home in the neighborhood where Anderson was then supposed to be.  On his way he passed by a burying-ground, and there found two soldiers who were at home on a furlough.  On request they went with Ballard, as some parts of the rugged township were not safe to travel in alone, and further, because the township was then thinly inhabited, and some of those were in the army.  Ballard, Richey and Pierce were in the line of duty.  In their search they drew up at the house of Wm. Stanfield, now on trial.  They inquired for Anderson, and here begins the story proper of the tragedy.  At some previous time there had been trouble between Stanfield and Ballard.  Stanfield had some badge or insignia in the shape of star, which he nailed on a tree where it could be seen by those passing by, and it was a source of aggravation to Ballard.  Probably Ballard tore it down.  Stanfield said he would whip Ballard for it.  When they rode up to Stanfield's house there was trouble between Stanfield and Ballard, and Stanfield said he would whip Ballard.Ballard thought, probably, he would have some fun out of Stanfield.  Stanfield dared Ballard to get off his horse.  Ballard was armed, and the other soldiers were also armed.  It was necessary then.  Ballard threw his coat back, and Peirce said in order to aid in the scare of Stanfield." 'Don't shoot, don't shoot!' "Stanfield ran in the house, and came to the front door, and said: ' I'll be even with you before tomorrow." "I expect to prove that he carried out that threat.  Ballard and his comrades went on.  There were no weapons drawn.  These soldiers visited many houses that evening, and in some of them searched for the deserter.  Late in the night they separated and went home.  Their roads separated within half a mile of Ballard's house, and their homes were close.  It was agreed that Ballard should signal by a shot that he had arrived home safe.  The two comrades heard the shot, and saw no more of Ballard till they saw him a bleeding corpse.  Ballard's family had just moved there.  He arrived home about 12 o'clock at night. 
The next morning he arose at the very first peep of day and started to the house of a relative.  He went up the road on foot, and had been gone long enough to have walked half a mile when pistol shots were heard.  In a little while some one at the house of Ballard went down the road and came back hurriedly, reporting that Ballard was killed.  The wife hurried to the scene, and saw her husband riddled with bullets.
"Some of those engaged in that bloody deed have died and are before the bar of another world, but some are here in this court-room.  We will try to show that these four men arraigned here are implicated.
"Soon after Ballard passed Stanfield's the latter went to the home of Quackenbush.   He had a gun on his shoulder.  He said he would have Jack Ballard.  Quackenbush went with him, and they went first to the home of Stanfield, the father of the defendant.  They then went to the home of old man Ballard, but not finding their victim there they went to Ballard's home.  In the stable they found a saddle and a horse, and by the scar on the hip of tbe horse they knew they had found Ballard.  They reported to their rendezoons at the old house: 'Boys, we're got him now.'
They stayed all night in this country log house.  Knowing that Ballard would take one or the other of the two paths from the house, they posted themselves in two companies, one on each road, and waited for Ballard.  After the report of the guns they dispersed to their homes.
'They were posted in a thicket Ballard came along there, and raising his eyes was startled to see Stanfield pointing his gun at him.  He shot and Ballard fell dead.  Two others fired, and then William Stanfield took Ballard's pistol and fired it into Ballard's body.  There were six or seven wounds in his body. They kept their secret twenty-four years, but on account of trouble last spring one of the men, through fear, made a clean breast of it all. lndictments followed and their arrests.  We will show that we have the right parties."
And this is the beginning of this great trial.


 The Indianapolis Journal
Friday, 7 September 1888

A War-Day Crime Recalled
The Murder of Jackson Ballard by a Party of Knights of the Golden Circle
How the Crime Was at Last Revealed Through a Second Murder and the Criminals Arrested - Story Told by Ballard's Widow
The Story Told by Ballard's Widow.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

Shoals, Ind., Sept. 6. The trial of the four men accused of the murder of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, in 1864, while in the line of duty seeking a deserter from his company, who was thought to be secreted in this county at the time, has become the all-absorbing topic of conversation here.  The hideousness of the crime and the brutality manifested by the death-wounds upon the murdered man's body, together with the report at the time that it was the bloody work of the Knights of the Golden Circle, has enlisted almost a startled interest in the progress of the case.
Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard, widow of the murdered man, is here ready for the trial.  Your correspondent met her, and she related to him her version of the cold-blooded, dastardly killing.
She is about fifty-five years of age and a little gray.  The corpulency of age has already begun to creep upon her, but she looks hale and stout.  She cannot be called handsome, but she is quick and intelligent. 
Her recollection of that one dreadful event in her life is perfectly clear and reliable, and she tells the story with a steely air that shows the lurking spirit of revenge in her bosom.  For over twenty-four years she has kept her plighted vows to her dead husband and has never married. At this time she is receiving a pension from the government.
Sitting in the private office of her counselor-at-law she said her husband, Jackson Ballard, enlisted in the army Jan. 9, 1861, and was a member of Company I, Twenty-fourth Indiana Regiment.  He re-enlisted after serving three years, and Jan. 22, 1864, came home on a veteran furlough.  On the 2d of March, 1864, he left to report to his regiment at Evansville, Ind.  Captain Morley, of Mitchell, was his captain. Lost River township, Martin county, takes its name from Lost river. This stream is one of the wonders of nature. The stream runs squarely against a great ledge of rock and sinks out of sight into the earth with a great swirl, and is lost to view.  Many miles below there it again emerges from the ground and sweeps on to the Ohio river.  Lost River township is a wild, rocky, woody, lonely country, and in this section, near the Orange county line, the murder was committed.  Here was the home of the Archers, hung by a mob at this town.  It was the scene of the notorious Bunch murder, and the more recent violent death of Miss Anna Belle Stanfield. On the day preceding the murder of Ballard the lady who told us this story had moved with her family from Natchez, a village seven miles east of here, to Lost River township.
'I was, of course," said Mrs. Ballard, 'compelled to superintend the moving myself.  We moved into a double log house, in one part of which lived Joe Emmons. I did not know that my husband had returned that day.  That evening Bedford Phillips, who was there at Joe Emmons's, asked Joe to go to old Dan Emmons's with him to a meeting.  I thought nothing of that. Then he said he had to go to Pete Williams's that night, and wanted Joe to go with him.  After that they hushed up and said not another word. I did not think of it then, but I see it all now.
"As I said, we moved on March 17, and about midnight that night my husband came home, very much to my surprise.  He told me of his hunting for the deserter from his company, Allen Anderson.  He arose very early, just at the first peep of day, on the morning of March 18.   He said he was going to Pete Williams's, a brother-in-law of Anderson, to see if he was there.   He had gone but a very few minutes when my children and myself heard guns firing.
I thought Ballard was shooting his gun as he did in the night when he arrived home. The children said they counted ten guns, but I only counted four.  We had not got up yet I paid but little attention to the shooting.  After a while I got up, got breakfast and waited two hours on him.  But he did not return.
"Joe Emmons, after some parleying, started down the road to mill-- He did not appear to want to go.  In a minute he came riding hurriedly up the road to the house.  He said he saw a dead man down there.  I asked him whether it was a soldier, and he said he did not stop to look.  Then he said he thought he had on soldier clothes.  My children and I ran down there.  He was lying on his back, one arm out, and his revolver gone.  There was a great ugly wound in his neck, one in his temple, one in his breast, and the forefinger shot off of his right hand.  I did not see the other wounds then, but they said there were two in his waist and one in his knee.  His face was powder-burnt and so was his breast.  When I saw him two hours after he left the house, his face and hands were cold.  It was a terrible affair for me.
"The body of the dead was taken to the house by friends who had collected on the scene.  'Squire Newland summonsed witnesses in the inquest trial at the house.  Dave Emmons, now dead, Bedford Phillips and Ben Hackey were brought up.  The Squire asked Joe Emmons why he did not go to Pete Williams's the night before, as he had said, and he simply answered that he wanted to take daylight for it. 
That looked suspicious.  He knew about it.  He was afraid to go down the road to mill.  Though he had not been out of the house, he understood. There was a conspiracy.  It was well known that a gang of the Knights of the Golden Circle were located around there, and these men were all thought to belong to that cowardly order. It was a well-planned conspiracy, and was a resistance to the authority of the government.  That was the design of the order of the Knights of the Golden Circle. My husband was born in 1832, and lies buried now in Lost River township.
"I have no idea how many attacked him.  An old rotten log lying where he was shot showed the marks of where guns had lain upon it.  There were pieces of the old tree set up as a screen for them to hide behind.
"Quackenbush said in his confession that Ballard's revolver was taken away from him after he fell, and that Stanfield shot him after he was down - shot him with his own revolver.  It was a terrible affair.
"I have heard that Allen Anderson married a sister of Pete Williams while he was at home on a furlough.  He did not report to his regiment and Ballard was sent after him.  He was searching for him when he was killed. I have no knowledge of Anderson now.  It is reported that he is dead.  About two years ago I heard he was here.  He was supposed to have gone to Canada after the murder of my husband."
This is the story of this soldier's widow.  It was learned that on the Sunday night after the burial of Ballard some soldiers took one Dave Holt, a man of weak mind, and hung him to the limb of a tree, in order to extort a confession from him.  But he knew nothing, and the torture developed nothing.  His half-witted condition preserved him from a knowledge of the conspiracy to murder, though he was believed to be a member of the Knights of the Golden Circle.  For twenty-four years the secret was well kept.


The Watertown Daily Times (New York)
7 September 1888

On Trial for a War-time Murder.

SHOALS, IND. Sept. 7. - The celebrated "Knights of the Golden Circle" case is now being tried in the Martin county court.  Great interest is manifested in the trial, and the people crowd the courtroom at every session.  The prisoners, Rev. John W. Stone, a preacher of the so-called "Christian" sect, John G. Jones, a county commissioner, Albert Quackenbush and William Stanfield, farmers, and James Archer, likewise a farmer, are all present in court.
The crime was committed twenty-four years ago, when Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, was riddled with bullets by the Knights of the Golden Circle.  The prosecution is the result of the aquittal of young Charles Archer, son of one of the defendants, for the murder of his sweetheart, Miss Anna Stanfield, daughter of another of the defendants.  The killing of Miss Stanfield and the aquittal of Archer brought about a bitter feud among the elders.  Albert Quackenbush, alarmed at the loud talk on both sides, determined to save himself, and went before the grand jury and made a clean breast of his connection with the crime, and showed what part in it the others had.
Notwithstanding the long time that has elapsed, fifty witnesses are available and have been summoned.


The Daviess County Democrat
8 September 1888

JACK BALLARD

The History of the Case as Stated to the Jury by T.J. Brooks
Tuesday the Ballard murder trial was called in the Martin Circuit Court. The jury has been impaneled, and the case is progressing, the statement of the case was made to the jury by T. J. Brooks. It contains the whole history of case, and will be found below:
" March 18, 1864, Jackson Ballard was murdered in this county.  He was a soldier, but that cuts little figure in the case.  It only goes to show how he was murdered.  Ballard had been at home a short time before on a veteran furlough, earned by re-enlisting in the army.
While his company was rendezvousing at Evansville a comrade, a neighbor, had deserted from his company.  Ballard was sent to arrest Anderson two weeks after he had reported for duty from his veteran furlough.  He got off the train here in Shoals in the early morning, got a horse, and went to his home in the neighborhood where Anderson was then supposed to be. On his way he passed by a burying ground and there found two soldiers who were home on a furlough.  On request they went with Ballard, as some parts of the rugged township were not safe to travel in alone, and further because the township was then thinly inhabited, and some of those were in the army.  Ballard, Richey and Pierce were in the line of duty.  In their search they drew up at the home of Wm. Stanfield, now on trial.  They inquired for Anderson, and here begins the story proper of the tragedy, At some previous time there had been trouble between Stanfield and Ballard. Stanfield had some badge or insignia in the shape of a star, which he nailed on a tree where it could he seen by those  passing by, and it was a source of aggravation to Ballard.  Probably Ballard tore it down.  Stanfield said he would whip Ballard for it.  When they rode up to Stanfield's house, there was trouble between Stanfield and Ballard, and Stanfield said he would whip Ballard.  Ballard thought, probably, he would have some fun out of Stanfield.  Stanfield ordered Ballard to get off his horse.  Ballard was armed, and the other soldiers were also armed.  It was necessary then.  Ballard threw his coat back, and Pierce said in order to aid in the scare of Stanfield.
"Don't shoot, don't shoot !" "Stanfield ran in the house, and came to the front door, and said: "I'll be even with you before tomorrow."
"I expect to prove that he carried out that threat.  Ballard and his comrades went on.  There were no weapons drawn."
"These soldiers visited many houses that evening, and in some of them searched for the deserter.  Late in the night they seperated and went home.  Their roads seperated within half a mile of Ballard's home, and their homes were close. It was agreed that Ballard should signal by a shot that he arrived home safe.
The two comrades heard the shot, and saw no more of Ballard till they saw him a bleeding corpse. Ballard's family had just moved there.  He arrived home at about 12 o'clock at night.  The next morning he arose at the very first peep of day and started to the home of a relative.
He went up the road on foot, and had been gone long enough to have walked half a mile when pistol shots were heard.  In a little while some one at the home of Ballard went down the road and came back hurriedly, reporting that Ballard was killed. The wife hurried to the scene and saw her husband riddled with bullets.
"Some of those engaged in that bloody deed have died and are before the bar of another world, but some are here in this court room.  We will try to show that these four men arraigned here are implicated."
"Soon after Ballard passed Stanfield's the latter went to the house of Quackenbush.  He had a gun on his shoulder.  He said he would have Jack Ballard. Quackenbush went with him, and they went first to the home of Stanfield, the father of the defendant they then went to the home of old man Ballard, but not finding their victim they went to Ballard's home.  In the stable they found a saddle and horse, and by the scar on the hip of the horse they knew they had found Ballard.  They reported to their rendezvous at the old house: "Boys we've got him now!"
They staid all night in this country log house.  Knowing that Ballard would take one or the other of the two paths from the house, they posted themselves in two companies, one on each road, and waited for Ballard. After the report of the guns they dispersed to their homes.
"They were posted in a thicket, Ballard came along there, and raising his eyes was startled to see Stanfield pointing his gun at him.  He shot and Ballard fell dead.  Two others fired, and then Wm. Stanfield took Ballard's pistol and fired it into Ballard's body.  There were six or seven wounds in his body. They kept their secret 24 years, but on account of trouble last spring, one of the men through fear made a clean breast of it all. Indictments followed and then arrests.  We will show that we have the right practices.
And this is the beginning of this great trial.
After the trial was about half through Judge Hefron took sick and adjourned Court until Monday. Judge Hefron and Judge Gardiner returned to their home yesterday.


The Indianapolis Journal
Saturday, 8 September 1888

The Ballard Murder Trial
The Story of the Assasination Told in Court by the Son of the Murdered Man.
The Quarrel Between Stanfield and Ballard - Quackenbush, Who Revealed the Authors of the Crime, on the Witness-Stand.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, Ind., Sept. 7 - The trial of Stanfield, Jones, Archer and Stone is reviving memories of the war and provoking a great deal of talk of a reminiscent character.  The prosecution is presenting a great array of testimony, and making as strong a case as possible.
The testimony of John T. Ballard, son of the murdered man, was particularly interesting.  He was eight years old at the time of the tragedy.  He recollected very well that he and his mother were the first on the spot, about 200 yards from the house, where the dead body of his father lay.  It was lying across the road, bloody and mutilated.  The witness described the rail fence where his father crossed into the road, and made plain, the different bends in the road.  The ugly, ghastly wounds were minutely described, and in all they numbered seven.  The wound in the neck was made by a larger ball than were the other wounds.  It was an awful wound, and tore away nearly one side of the neck.  The ball was never found. 
The ball that entered the temple was thought to be still in the brain.  Either the wound in the neck, or the temple, or the breast, or the waist would have killed him. The road from the house led down a declivity, and there was frost on that morning.  The log in the bend of the road was old and rotten, and showed the marks of the guns that were placed upon it by those in ambush.  A stump near by showed that someone had secreted himself behind it.  Some large trees near by also screened some of the bushwhackers.  The leaves were trampled down around them.  He did not know Allen Anderson, the deserter, and does not know where he lives now.  He heard he left the country about the time of the bloody deed.  Not long since, more than a year ago, he heard that Allen Anderson had returned for a brief time.
The testimony of O. P. Pierce, one of the soldiers that was with Ballard the day before his foul murder, was next called to the witness-stand, and his testimony was most interesting, as throwing light on the difficulty between Ballard and Stanfield.  He stated that he was at home on a furlough and saw Ballard on the 17th and 18th of March, 1864.  He was attending the funeral of his brother-in-law's child, when Ballard rode up.  The funeral ended about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, and then they started on the hunt of Allen Anderson, who had deserted from his company.  They were on horses, and were accompanied by Lew Richie, who was also at home on a furlough.  They stopped at a number of houses and made inquiries for the deserter.  They first stopped at Wm. Stanfield's.
Stanfield was in the road in front of his house chopping wood.  Ballard said to him: "How do you do, Bill"
'Good evening," Stanfield responded.  ''Is Anderson here?" inquired Ballard.  "I have seen him, but do not know where he is now," answered Stanfield.  Then Ballard said: "Bill, I understand you said if you had been at home when that star of yours was torn down you would have killed me."  'No, I said if I had been there you or I, one, would have got a d-- n good licking," answered Stanfield.  "Maybe you want to try it now," said Ballard.  "All right; get off your horse." said Stanfield.  Ballard had two Smith & Wesson revolvers, Richie had one, and Pierce had a Spencer rifle. They did not dismount at Stanfield's.  Ballard wore a big blue soldier overcoat with a cape on it.  His revolvers were in a belt. At the banter of Stanfield to get off his horse he threw back his overcoat and exposed his belt and revolvers.  Stanfield at once dropped his ax, sprang over the rail fence around his house, ran to the rear and appeared at the front door.  He put his hand over the door and held it, just where the gun usually rests in a log cabin home. 
His head was put out at the open door.   "For God's sake," begged Mrs. Stanfield, "don't shoot him oh - don't shoot him!  Pierce answered her: "Mrs. Stanfield, don't be alarmed; we have come here to hurt no one." "D-- n you, Jack, if you want to fight fair, I will fight you yet," said Stanfield.  "O, I thought you was afraid of me," said Ballard.  They now rode off.  When about thirty yards from the house, Stanfield shouted after them: "D-- n you. Jack, I'll get even with you, yet!  "All right," answered Ballard.  This incident occurred about 4 o'clock in the afternoon.  No one was seen at the house but Mr. and Mrs. Stanfield.  Mrs. Stanfield is dead.
It was brought out in the cross-examination that Ballard had said when they rode up that he was going to have "some fun out of Stanfield."
They rode on to Alf Quackenbush's, about a mile away, and there Ballard and Richie searched the house for Anderson, while Pierce held the horses.  They also inquired that night at a number of other houses.  They went into one house where there were two or three women and seven or eight men.  They were around a dim light, engaged in church services.  The witness did not know whether the defendants at this bar were there or not, as he did not know them then.  The three men went into the house. It was David Emmons's house.  Ballard pushed open the door, and they entered. Those within were excited at their entrance, and arose.  Ballard asked whether Anderson was there, and if they knew where he was.  A man answered them that he was not there, and that they did not know where he was.  Then they left, and proceeded to other houses.  These three men were together until about 12 o'clock that night, and within half a mile of Ballard's house separated.  Pierce went home with Richie, who lived about four miles away.  It was agreed that Ballard should fire a single shot on reaching borne, to indicate that he had arrived home safe.  The open opposition of the Knights of the Golden Circle to the prosecution of the war, and the pronounced principles of the order in opposition to drafts, and its hatred of all Union soldiers, and its sympathy for the success of the Southern soldiers, together with the knowledge that that section of the country was a hot-bed of secession, induced these soldiers
to scheme for their own safety.  Ballard fired the shot when he reached his home, and the other two men knew nothing had happened to him.
Pierce saw Ballard the next day about 10 o'clock, in the embrace of cold death, at his own home.  He described the ground where the tragedy occurred, the old, rotten log, and the appearance of the ground that had been pressed by many feet.  He described the morning of the tragedy as a cool, clear one.The star that Stanfield had nailed to a tree in the road in a conspicuous place, so that it could be seen by persons coming and going, and that had been torn down by Ballard, was an emblem of the order of the Knights of the Golden Circle.  It was probably both a sign of warning and a call for a meeting.  It may have been a declaration of war, like that of the Indians when they dug up the tomahawk and stuck it in a tree.  It is a terrible thing when neighborhoods band together to kill their neighbors and acquaintances.
Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard testified that her husband, Jackson Ballard, had been dead twenty-four years the 18th of last March.  She told of his furloughs and visits home, and of his last visit to her.  They had five children John, James, Jackson, Mary Ann and Nancy Ann. She described the log house into which she had just moved, and related why he had gone away so early on that fateful morning.  She told how Joe Emmons found the dead body of her husband, and depicted its horrible condition.  She said the inquest was held early in the morning by Squire Newland, and that John G. Jones was there a few minutes afterward, but she did not know that he was subpoenaing witnesses for the inquest.  Her testimony was very important as corroborating testimony, but in the nature of things added nothing to the proof of a conspiracy to assassinate Ballard.
Louis Richie, the other soldier who was with Ballard the day before his violent death, testified about as Pierce did.  He said Ballard was riding a chestnut-colored horse that had a scar on its hip or side from a burn or scald.  No hair was on the scar.  He repeated the conversation between Ballard and Stanfield, iterated the threat the latter made to Ballard, and told what occurred on their search for Anderson at other places.  He told about the crowd in a house, and how they surrounded it and entered from front and rear at same time, and the consternation of the inmates.  Someone said there was preaching there, but they did not know.  They separated very late at night.
Mrs. Eva Crowder said that she saw John Stone the morning of the murder, a little after sun-up, at his father's, one and a quarter mile from Ballard's; also, another man whom she took to be Albert Quackenbush.
When Albert Quackenbush took the witness stand the acme of interest was reached.  It was known that he was the man who had peached and exposed this murder by the Knights of the Golden Circle.  His information to the grand jury led to the arrest of Rev. Stone, Commissioner Jones, Archer and Stanfield. 
The witness said he was fifty-eight years old, and lived in Lost River township, Martin county, in 1864; said he knew Jack Ballard and the defendants at this court; said Ballard came to his house March 17, 1864, accompanied by Pierce and Richie, searching for the deserter Anderson.  It was late in the evening when they left, and shortly after they left Stanfield and Jones, armed with guns, came to his house.  Ziba Quackenbush was at his house, and his wife and his children, John, Edward, William and Sarah were present.
Stanfield and Jones said Ballard had been at Stanfield's house and threatened to kill him, and they were going to do him up for it. Taking his loaded gun Quackenbush went with them to Rev. Stone's, but he was not there.  They then went to Ballard's father's home.  The door was open and Stanfield was restrained from shooting in at the open door with difficulty.  Pursuing their purpose they went to the vacant house of Jane Newland, where they found all the defendants.  All were armed. The night was dark.Near daylight they carried out their purpose.  They went to a spot within 200 yards of Ballard's home, and deployed themselves for action.  Jones said he knew Ballard was there, for he had found the horse in his stable that had a scar on its side or hip.  Jones, Stanfield, witness and others were in one squad, and they located themselves near the house on a hillside.In about half an hour Ballard came down the road toward them.  Stanfield whistled and Ballard paused.  Then Stanfield shot.  Others within three feet of him shot.  Stanfield took the gun of the witness, larger bore than the guns of the others, and fired at Ballard.  Next he took Ballard's revolver and shot again.  He recollected four shots, Stanfield firing first. The victim fell at the first shot.  They dispersed as quickly as they could, and Stanfield said to Jones that he would be down to work for him so they would not be accused.  Stone remained in that neighborhood about a year as a preacher.  The witness is a brother-in-law of Stanfield.
The witness said he had heard that Anderson and his wife were in Canada, having gone thereabout the time of the tragedy.  Jones wanted him to go and aid in getting away with Ballard.
Wm. Quackenbush, son of Albert Quackenbush, said he remembered that Jones and Stanfield called that night at his father's, and asked him to go with them to kill Ballard.  His father went.  They were armed.  He had talked with James Archer years ago about the crime, and he had said Jones, Stanfield and others were guilty of it, but when Ballard was killed he said, "A d----d dirty dog was killed." Ziba Quackenbush saw Stanfield and Jones the night before at Albert Quackenbush's. Saw the latter coming back home about sun-up the next morning.
John Quackenbush, son of Albert Quackenbush, told the jury he knew Wm. Stanfield, and he had said in his hearing that he had killed Jack Ballard, and he didn't care who knew it. This was said fifteen years ago.  Ziba Quackenbush and Stanfield had a row, and Stanfield told him if he was not careful he would turn up missing like Jack Ballard.  Stanfield was at the witness's home about a month before Charley Archer's trial for the murder of Anna Belle Stanfield.   He asked for something to eat, saying he could have gotten something at his son's (Billy Stanfield's) at dinner time, but he was afraid his son's wife, Charley Archer's sister, would poison him.  He said things were coming out against the Archers that happened over twenty years ago.  The witness, he said, knew nothing about it, but his father, Albert Quackenbush, knew about it.
Mrs. Sarah Quackenbush, wife of John, said that Wm. Stanfield had asked for something to eat.  He was afraid to eat at dinnertime at his son Billie's, as the Archers are dangerous people.
He said something serious would come out of the killing of his daughter Anna Belle, and Jim Archer's barn was as near done as it would be, as one crime brings out another.
James Williams knew Jack Ballard, and was at his funeral.  Marley accompanied him from the funeral to Walker's, who lived near the grave-yard.  He and about ten soldiers went to hunt for Stone, and they found him and twelve or fourteen others at David Emmons's, and guns for each man.  Marley arrested Stone, but he got away under fire.  It was 2 o'clock at night.
The soldiers hung Holt that night.  The soldiers captured about fourteen prisoners that night. Each soldier had a Spencer rifle.  Joseph Dooley was one of the soldiers and said Stone was armed, but he escaped barefooted. The witness thought the defendant looked something like the Stone arrested then.
The State rested here, and the defense will next introduce testimony. The defense will endeavor to prove alibi. The testimony corroborating Quackenbush's confession is strong.


Illinois Morning Star
8 September 1888

"Knights of the Golden Circle" on Trial.
VINCENNES, Ind., Sept. 7. -

The celebrated Ballard murder case is on trial in the Martin county circuit court at Shoals, Ind.  The Rev. Stone, a Christian preacher, County Commissioner Jones, William Stanfield, and James Archer are accused of a conspiracy to murder and of the actual assassination of Jack Ballard, a Union soldier, in 1864.  Ballard came home to look for a deserter and insulted some of the Knights of the Golden Circle, who wanted his blood.  After twenty-four years Albert Quackenbush, one of the murderers, confessed, and he is backed by a vast array of corroberative evidence.  The opening statement was made to the court Thursday and created a profound sensation.  Quackenbush's testimony on the stand is looked forward to with great interest.


 The Rochester Daily Republican
8 September 1888

A Relic of the War.
Justice Is Sometimes Slow But She "Gets There."
ON TRIAL FOR A WAR-TIME MURDER
One of the Conspirators Tells How the Union Soldier Ballard Was Killed in Indiana-

SHOALS, Ind, Sept. 8. -The crowds who have been attending the trial of County Commissioner John Jones, James Archer, John Stone, and William Stanfield for the murder of Jackson Ballard, a Union Soldier, for several days past in the hope of hearing some sensational testimony, were fully gratified yesterday. It had been rumored that Albert Quackenbush, who had been indicted with the others, was going to turn states evidence.
This rumor was confirmed yesterday morning when the district attorney asked that the indictmentagainst Quackenbush be nolled, which was done. The man then took the stand and gave the details of the murder.
"On March 17, 1864," he said, "Stanfield and Jones came to my house.  Both were armed with rifles. Stanfield said that he and Ballard had quarrelled, and that he and Jones were going to make up a crowd and kill Ballard.
I got my gun, and we three left together and went to Stone's house, but he was not at home. Stanfield and myself went to Jack Ballard's father's house to see if Jack was there. We heard a noise in the house, and Stanfield wanted to shoot into the house, but I kept him from it. We than went back to Stone's house where quite a crowd had collected. About midnight we all went to an old house near by. Stanfield and John Stone were sent to Mrs. Ballard's to see it her husband was there. They found him at home. Two crowds were then formed, one for each of the roads leading from Ballard's. All laid wait for him until about daylight, when Ballard was seen coming down a hill. Stanfield gave a sharp whistle, and Ballard stopped and looked around. At this instant Stanfield fired and Ballard fell to the ground. Jones and myself did not shoot at all. We all dispersed as soon as possible to avoid suspicion. Jones went into the army in the fall of the same year, and Stanfield and myself enlisted the following, spring."
Several other witnesses testified that they saw the men with their guns at Stone's house.
The state is through with their side of the case and, on account of the judge's sickness, court was adjourned until Monday, when the defense will commence their side of the case.


 The Daily Journal (Logansport Indiana)
Saturday, 8 September 1888

The Ballard murder trial in Martin county is one of the most remarkable cases in criminal history.  Wm. Stanfield, a farmer; John G. Jones, County Commissioner; Joseph Archer, farmer, and Rev. John Stone, a minister of the Christian Church, are defendants.
It is alleged that they were members of the Knights of the Golden Circle and on March 18, 1864, murdered Jackson Ballard.  One of their number, Albert Quackenbush, turned State's evidence.  There was a great crowd in attendance yesterday. Twelve young men constitute the jury.


 The Daily Democrat (Huntington, Indiana)
Saturday, 8 September 1888

Ballard Murder Trial.

VINCENNES, Ind., Sept. 8 - The testimony in the Ballard case on the part of the prosecution is all in and the State has rested.  Widow Ballard, James Ballard, son of the murdered man, O.P. Pierce, James Richey, Albert Quackenbush, and several others furnished some startling evidence, and it was strongly corroborated.  The testimony of Albert Quackenbush, the Knight of the Golden Circle, created a profound sensation.  He swore, point blank, that all of the four defendants, besides himself, had conspired to kill Ballard, and did kill him; that he had confessed to save his own neck, and that the state had agreed to nolle his indictment.  The crowd in the courtroom was greatly excited at this statement and the defendants looked very uneasy.


The Cincinnati Enquirer
Saturday, 8 September 1888

BALLARD'S DEATH
An Old War Murder Revived By the Confession of One of the Alleged Participants.
Bloody Deed Which Was Charged to the K.G.C.
Quackenbush on the Stand and Details the Circumstances of the Shooting - The State's Testimony Closed.
Special Dispatch To The Enquirer.

SHOALS, IND., September 7, - The Ballard murder trial holds it's interest without any abatement. 
Testimony commenced for the prosecution as follows:
O.P. Pierce, a Union soldier, was placed on the stand.  He went to the army in 1864.  He knew Jack Ballard, and lived on the Ballard farm four years.  Saw Jack Ballard March 17, 1864, when I was home on furlough from Indianapolis.  Saw Ballard at a funeral.  Ballard told me at the funeral that he was after a deserter.  We started after Allen Anderson, the deserter, accompanied by Tom Richey, a soldier.  Stopped often at different houses, and came to house of defendant, William Stanfield.  He was chopping wood.  Ballard asked Stanfield if he had said he would shoot him if he had been at home when he (Ballard) took that star down.
Stanfield said: "No, one of us would have got a d-----d good licking." "Maybe you want to do it now." said Ballard.  Ballard laughed, made a movement with his coat and Stanfield ran into the house.  Mrs. Stanfield ran out and said: "For God's sake Jack, don't shoot."  Ballard answered there was no danger of that.  Ballard started to go, and Stanfield yelled after him: "D--n you.  I will get even with you yet, before tomorrow."  Asked Stanfield where Anderson, the deserter, was.  Didn't know.  Ballard went off laughing.  Then went to the home of Albert Quackenbush.  Went to a house where a dim light was burning.  Those present claimed to have been to church.  Davis Emmons lived there.  We three were together until after midnight, and separated half a mile from Ballard's.  He was to shoot a pistol when he got home, which he did, and we heard it.  I saw Ballard's dead body next day at his home.  Chunks and logs were set up at the spot where Ballard was killed, as a blind.  The ground looked like persons had been tramping on it. 
Stanfield (defendant) said to Ballard: "If you will fight me a fair fight I will fight you yet."  And Ballard replied; "I knew you were afraid of me."  
Mrs. Elizabeth Ballard, wife of Jack Ballard, testified: Jackson Ballard has been dead twenty-four years. His regiment was at Evansville.  He had re-enlisted and had a veteran furlough on March 17.  Lived in a log house.  Didn't expect him home.  Joe Fleming lived in the same house with me.  Ballard reached home at midnight on the 17th of March, '64, and remained till morning.  He started for Peter Williams to look for a deserter.  He started west, toward a big wood.  I heard four shots.  Waited breakfast and heard more shots.  Emmons and Fleming started for the mill and came back and told me there was a man in the road who had been killed.  I went to the place and found my husband.  The revolver he wore on the right side was gone.  The wound on the temple was powder burnt.  I receive a pension as the widow of Jack Ballard.  He was gone two hours.  His face and hands were cold.  I attended the inquest. 
John Jones (one of the defendants) was there a few moments afterward.
Mrs. Eva Crowder testified that she saw County Commissioner Jones, one of the defendants, at Ballard's house early of the morning he was killed.
Great interest was awakened when Albert Quackenbush was put on the stand.  He is the Knight of the Golden Circle who testified and confessed to the Grand Jury of the association, and implicating Rev. Stone, Commissioner Jones, Stanfield and Archer. 
Witness said he was fifty-eight years old.  Live in Lost River Township.  Lived in Lost River Township in 1864, and knew Jack Ballard, Rev. Stone, the preacher, John Jones, County Commissioner, James Archer and Wm. Stanfield.  Saw Jack Ballard on March 17, 1864.  He came to my house accompanied by Soldiers, Ritchey and Pearce.  They were searching for Anderson, a deserter.  Ballard left my house late in the evening.  After they left, Stanfield and Jones came up to my house with guns.  These men said that Ballard had been at Stanfield's house and threatened to kill him.  They were going to do Ballard up.  I went with them with my loaded gun to Rev. Stone's, but he was not there.  We then went to Ballard's house.  The door opened and Stanfield wanted to shoot, but we told him not to.  We went to Jane Newland's vacant house and there found all the defendants.  It was a dark night.  All were armed. 
Near daylight we went to within two hundred yards of Ballard's house.  Jones said he knew Ballard by the scar on the horse he road.  Our crowd divided so as to guard the two paths, as we did not know which one Ballard would take.  We laid down and watched for him half an hour.  He finally came down the road in a trot, whistling.  He came twenty-five or thirty steps from where I was, when William Stanfield whistled and Ballard stopped, and Stanfield then shot him.  Arthur Shields and Stringer also shot him.  They were only three feet away.  Stanfield took my gun and again shot Ballard, and then he stepped up to Ballard's body and took his revolver.  I recollect only four shots.  Ballard fell the first shot. 
We then all left for home as soon as we could.  We didn't say much, but Stanfield said to Jones, "I will be down early to work for you, and we won't be accused."   Stone was a preacher.  He remained in the neighborhood after that about a year.  Jones, Stanfield and myself went into the army after the murder.  I was indicted with the defendants in this case.   Agreed to testify if indictments were nollied against myself.  I did this to save my own neck.  Never was asked about this murder before.  I told several on different occasions that this crime would come out.  The gang wanted to kill Ballard because he threatened Stanfield.  I am a brother-in-law of Stanfield.  No relation to Jones, but Jones wanted me to go with him to get away with Ballard. 
John Quackenbush, son of Albert Quackenbush, testified that he knew William Stanfield, and that he had boasted in his hearing that he had killed Jack Ballard and he didn't care who knew it.  This was fifteen years ago.  Stanfield and Ziba Quackenbush had a row, and Stanfield told him if he wasn't careful he would turn up missing like Jack Ballard. 
Mrs. Sarah Quackenbush, wife of John Quackenbush: William Stanfield came to my house and asked for something to eat in the presence of my husband and children: said he had been to Billy Stanfield's, but was afraid to eat dinner there as all the Archers were a dangerous people: said that something serious would come out of this Anna Belle Stanfield murder - something that happened twenty years ago.  He said Sim Archer's barn was as near done as it would ever be, as one crime brings out another. Found Mr. Stone and twelve or fourteen men at David Emmons'.  Found as many guns there as men. 
We arrested Stone, but he got away.  Maily had Stone in charge.  Several shots were fired at Stone.  It was two o'clock at night.  Never saw Stone again.  I attended Ballard's funeral.  A man named Holt was hanged by the soldiers that night.  The soldiers had twelve or fourteen prisoners.  Can't name any of the prisoners except Emmons and wife.  Don't know if Holt was hanged after they went after Stone or not.  Had Spencer rifles and soldiers clothes.
Here the State rested.  The defense will prove alibis, etc.  The State introduced many other witnesses, but their testimony was simply corroborative of the above in minor details.


The Indianapolis Journal
Sunday, 9 September 1888

The Ballard Murder
Judge Gardiner States the Case for the Defense, and the Taking of Testimony Begins.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, Ind., Sept. 8 - The State having concluded its evidence in the Ballard case, all of which has been heretofore given as briefly as possible, the defense proceeded to give its testimony, and recalled Albert Quackenbush, whose confession to the grand jury and others implicate him in the crime of the murder of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier.  Some very pointed questions were put to him, and at times he was not a little confused, but he answered each question quite promptly. He knew Wm. Spooner, a farmer living in Lost River township, and had no recollection of a conversation with him about this case, and no recollection of having said to him that he wanted all the balance to come clear except Wm. Stanfield, because he was afraid of him.  He denied having said to Jonathan Emmons he had forgotten all about the killing of Ballard; neither did he say to James Archer that he had forgotten all about the murder of Ballard. He confessed to having a conversation with him last June.  Archer asked him where he saw Archer that eventful night, but did not say that he saw him any place.  It was, in fact, at the oldhouse where they had their rendezvous. He very positively denied that he had said he would do anything to get away with Wm. Stanfield. Judge W. R. Gardiner made a clear and forcible statement for the defense, and probably made as favorable an impression on the jury as was possible in the case.  He personally represented James and Archer, but on the part of the united counsel he stated the main features of defense for all the defendants.  He said it was their purpose to prove an alibi in each and every case, and to do that would be the chief burden of their labors before the jury. He declared that the defendant knew nothing of the murder of Ballard until they saw his mutilated corpse. "When a man knows nothing about it,' said Mr. Gardiner, ''an alibi is the only defense he has, and it is the best defense in the world, in fact the only way to meet the charge. The defense of these men is just that and nothing more.  Mr. Quackenbush tells you a story we shall contradict, and we shall call upon you to look at him, his manner, the bargain he has made.  Look at his hair, his neck, his flippant and laughing manner.  We shall do this that the people may testify that he is a colossal liar.  We will prove that at the time poor Ballard was killed there was a man in that neighborhood by the name of Allen Anderson, a man who had married a sister of Albert Quackenbush.  Anderson must have known that Ballard was back there to arrest him and separate him from his wife.  The testimony of the son of Ballard that there were barricades in two places proves our theory.  Anderson went away and was never seen again in that neighborhood but by one man, the next day, since that awful day.  The sister of Quackenbush went away with Anderson. They never came back.  Quackenbush heard from him and heard that he left the day before the assassination, or the day after that. Quackenbush said that he stopped at his mother's to get Anderson; but he was not there. It was apart of his scheme to get his wife on the road so he could get back from French Lick Springs to shoot Ballard down before he left for Canada.  Albert Quackenbush and his brother Ziba have been before the grand jury beforethis and never told of this crime.  Now they come before this court to testify to help carry out this bargain to save their necks and shield them from their dastardly crime."  At this point Judge Gardiner read the affidavit of those before the grand jury in an eloquent and impressive manner.  Part of the defense will be that one of the man who gave the most important testimony had been before the grand jury twice and had taken this same oath.  The several crimes in Lost River township have led Albert Quackenbush, through fear his crime would come out, to do what he has done.  It has led him to talk to William Stanfleld about it.
But never in all these twenty-four years has he opened his lips to Jones, or Archer, or Stone. His cowardly soul had never prompted him to go to them.  He fixed on these men, and particularly Stanfield, because he was afraid of him, to save his own neck.  He confesses that he did not want Stanfield to escape.  He has forgotten the names of those who took part with him in this bloody crime, and does not know whether they are living or dead.  On that night Archer was at his home in Orange county, five or six miles away.  His wife is dead, but his son will testify that he was at home all that night.  Others will testify to the same thing.  It will not be from the mouths of professed perjurers and murderers.  Gardner said Jones was an honest man, and he and his wife will testify they could not have gone from home that night without those persons knowing it.  Witnesses will testify where Rev. Stone was that night, and show the terror all felt from an armed body of soldiers in their community.  Dr. Stone was preaching peace and good will to all men instead of blood and murder.  This has already been proved. Wm. Stanfield went to his father's and stayed all night after these soldiers left him at his home.Jared C. Stone, brother of John Stone, was called as a witness for the defense.
He said in substance: 
In March, 1864, lived in Lost River township, one-half mile from David Emmons's.  John Stone lived near same distance.  Was at David Emmons's night of murder at preaching by John Stone, Christian minister, after meeting three men armed and in uniforms. He had gone to David Emmons's that morning to a house-raising, and stayed for meeting that night.  Did not see Jones, Stanfield or Archer that day.  Heard next morning that hallooing and crying at Ballard's, and went down and found that Ballard had been killed. Soldiers came that night and arrested his father.  Did not see Albert Quackenbush or Dr. Stone the day of the murder. The latter's wife was in Harrison county. 
Did not see Geo. Stringer, Shields, Jones or Stanfield at David Emmons's.  Saw Allen Anderson day before the murder at David Emmons's, and when asked whether he was not afraid of being arrested for staying away so long said he was not afraid.  He had a rifle and revolver. James K. Emmons said he was at the meeting at Emmons's; Stone preached he and Stone slept there
all night; after meeting three soldiers came there; he was thirteen years old at the time; saw Stone get up about daylight next morning; he slept in same room with witness; Stone started home from there, and came back for breakfast; he was not gone long; he came back and worked at witness's uncle's; heard of Ballard's murder in the forenoon; Stone was sawing stave timber; soldiers came that night; saw no guns but the guns of the soldiers; while soldiers were at the cupboard eating Stone fled barefooted, as he could not find his boots.  George T. Emmons said he staid at David Emmons's night before the murder; Stone preached there that night; only a small crowd, and they sat on chairs and planks staid there all night, and Stone was in bed when he got up; he was there at breakfast; Stone went home after breakfast, about half a mile away, and came back after one- half hour, at sun-up; he went home for his medicine case: witness did not recollect seeing Albert Quackenbush; saw Anderson that day; did not recollect whether Stone had a belt and revolver or not.
Jonathan B. Emmons, son of David Emmons now dead, did not know Ballard; his father died fifteen years ago; Stone was at his father's night after murder; soldiers tried to take him, but he got away; he preached his father's funeral.
Phillip C. Emmons said he married a sister of John W. Stone, the preacher; did not know Ballard; Stone led a little singing after the meeting at his father's: Stone staid there all night; Stone was at breakfast: did not know that he had been away before the morning meal; that night about seven soldiers came and arrested Stone, but he got away: only father's gun there and it was over door; did not know that Quackenbush had any arms the day of the house-raising; Stone left neighborhood after soldiers got after him.
Cynthia A. Emmons was at church at David Emmons's the night before the murder; had singing after the murder; saw the three soldiers that came there; Anderson was there about dinner time with a gun; did not recollect how he was dressed; Stone pulled his shoes off before the soldiers came.
This was as far as the defense got with the evidence, when Judge D. J. Hefron announced that court would stand adjourned till Monday next on account of his illness.  On the first session of court again the defense will take up the thread of their evidence and hear the testimony of the many witnesses yet to examine. The jury was placed in the charge of a bailiff.  One of the jurors was permitted to go home on account of the death of his father, but he was accompanied by a bailiff.
The trial is exciting great interest and the people are turning out everywhere to attend the trial.


 The New Albany Evening Tribune
10 September 1888

TO SAVE HIS OWN NECK.
One of the Participants In the Murder of Ballard In Indiana During the War Confesses.

VINCENNES, Ind., Sept. 9.-The testimony in the Ballard case on the part of the prosecution is all in and the State has rested.  Widow Ballard, James Ballard, son of the murdered man, O.P. Pierce, James Ritchey, Albert Quackenbush and several others furnished some startling evidence, and it was strongly corroborated.
The testimony of Albert Quackenbush, the Knight of the Golden Circle, created a profound sensation.  He swore, point blank, that all of the four defendants, besides himself, had conspired to kill Ballard and did kill him; that he had confessed to save his own neck, and that the State had agreed to nolle his indictment. The crowd in the court-room was greatly excited at this statement and the defendants looked very uneasy.


The Indianapolis Journal
Tuesday, 11 September 1888

Indiana and Illinois News
Testimony for the Defense in the Ballard Murder Case on Trial at Shoals, INDIANA
The Defense in the Ballard Murder Trial Endeavors to Prove an Alibi.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal

SHOALS, Sept. 10 - The Ballard murder trial was resumed today, with continued interest, having been postponed from Thursday last on account of the illness of Judge Heffron. The State closed its evidence before adjournment on Thursday, and the evidence for the defense was today began, James K. Emmons, Geo. Emmons, Jonathan Emmons and Philip C. Emmons swearing that Rev. John Stone and some half-dozen other persons were at a religious meeting at David Emmons's on the night before the murder, and all testified that neither John Stone nor David Emmons was away from the house of David Emmons on the night of the murder, and could not have participated in the crime.  The evidence pointed strongly to other parties.  It begins to look like Quackenbush and his brother-in-law, a deserter who was seen on the day before, armed with a gun and two revolvers, and for whom Ballard was searching as a deserter with a view to arrest and return to the service, might be guilty.
John Shields testified that, he knew Anderson, the deserter; that it was generally known that Ballard was after him to arrest him; that about sunrise on the morning of the murder, and not over an hour from the time it was committed, the witness saw this deserter and his wife on foot about one mile from the scene of the murder; he had a carpet-sack in his right hand and she had a parcel tied up in something red in her left hand, and they were running at the top of their speed, getting away from the place where the murder was committed.  Defendant Stone testified that he had nothing to do with the killing of Ballard, and corroborated what was said about his whereabouts, adding that he did not see any of his co-defendants on the night of the murder or the next day.


The Cincinnati Enquirer
11 September 1888

PROVING ALIBIS.
Ballard's Alleged Murderers' Defense
What Was Regarded as a Golden Circle Meeting Was a Religious Gathering, Presided Over by Defendant Preacher Stone.
SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER.

SHOALS, IND., September 10. - Judge Heffron found his health sufficiantly improved to resume the Ballard murder trial today.  The interest in the trial is still intense.  The State had closed it's evidence on Thursday evening, when the health of Judge Heffron compelled an adjournment for further hearing until today.  The statement for the defense was made by Judge Gardiner.  The statement showed that the defense would be an alibi for each of the defendants, and prove that the murder was committed by the traitor, Albert Qualkenbush, and his brother-in-law, Allen Anderson, the deserter, of whom Ballard was in search.
The defense took up the case of Stone, who is a PHYSICIAN AND CHRISTIAN PREACHER.
It was shown on the part of Stone by witnesses that Stone, instead of being along with Qualkenbush at the murder of Ballard, was holding a religious meeting at the house of David Emmons.  Stone remained all night at David Emmons' and took his breakfast there the next morning.Allen Anderson was at the house of David Emmons on the day before the murder.  He had a gun and two revolvers.  He was aware that Ballard was after him to arrest him.  David Emmons, who Qualkenbush swore assisted in the murder of Ballard, was shown by all of said witnesses to have been at home all of the night BEFORE BALLARD WAS KILLED. And was at home early next morning, and could not have been present at the murder.  David Emmons is now dead.  What the witnesses, Pierce and Richey, thought to be a meeting of the Knights of the Golden Circle proved to be a religious meeting.
John Shields, an old and respected citizen of Orange County, testified that he lived at the time of the Ballard murder about one mile east of the place the murder was committed; saw defendant (Stone) on the evening before the murder was committed on his way to preach at David Emmons'.  He was well aquainted with all of the defendants.  He had married Allen Anderson a few days before the murder to Albert Qualkenbush's sister.  He saw Allen Anderson and his wife coming from toward the point where Ballard was killed.  He had hold of her right hand, and had a carpet-sack in his right hand and she had a bundle TIED UP IN SOMETHING RED.
They were running on foot at their best speed when they came in sight; they passed him and went out of sight, still running.  Neither of them had ever been seen in this country since.  He knew defendant (Archer).  He was at home at the time of the murder, taking care of a sick child.
The defendant (Stone) testified in his own behalf that he was not present at the Ballard murder; was at David Emmons' when the murder was committed; did not see any of his co-defendants on the day or night of the murder; did not see Albert Qualkenbush on that night.  He did not know Ballard, and never saw him, unless it was in company with the soldiers, Pierce and Richey.  He remained in the neighborhood for some months, and filled several appointments to preach.  He afterward moved to Illinois.  When he heard he was charged with this crime he came on without any requisition, and is now on trial. The tide is setting in very strong for the defendants.


The Indianapolis News
11 September 1888

TRIAL AT SHOALS
(Special to The Indianapolis News.)

SHOALS, September 11. - The Ballard murder case was resumed today, the defense beginning their side of the case.  W.P. Gardiner made the opening for the defense, in which he said they would prove an alibi for all the defendants.  It was proved by several witnesses that Allen Anderson was seen near the place where Ballard was killed on the night before the murder, armed with a gun and two revolvers. 
Philip Emmons and George Emmons testified that defendant John Story preached at David Emmons's the night before the killing of Ballard, and eat his breakfast the next morning at David Emmons's house.  He said it was impossible for Stone to be present when Ballard was murdered. 
John Shield of Orange County testified that he knew all the defendants.  He said Archer was at home attending to a sick child on the morning of the murder, and he saw Allen Anderson, on the morning of the killing of Ballard, in company with his wife running at full speed near the scene of the murder.  He said that they (Anderson and wife) had not been seen in this county since.  John Stone testified in his own behalf that he was not present at the murder of Ballard.  The evidence was strongly in favor of the defendants.


The Cincinnati Enquirer
12 September 1888

THE BALLARD TRIAL
Defendant Stone Rigidly Cross-Examined, But He Holds to His Original Testimony Remarkably Well.
His Statements Corroborated by Other Witnesses - The Case Growing in Interest, and More Important Evidence To Come.
SPECIAL DISPATCH TO THE ENQUIRER.

SHOALS, IND., September 11. -  Promptly at half-past eight o'clock this morning Judge Heffron called up the Ballard murder trial.  Defendant Stone was called and cross-examined most unmercifully by the State, but the cross-examination only seemed to strengthen his direct testimony.  It was elicited that he had spent the last eight years of his life preaching in this and in contiguous counties of this State: that he left this State in 1872, and has been ever since a resident of the State of Illinois. 
S.P. Yenne, Sheriff of Martin County, was next examined.  He testified that when Stone was indicted he telegraphed the Sheriff of Defendant Stone's county to arrest him and hold him until he could get a requisition.  He stated that Stone sent word to him that he needed no requisition: that he would come without it, which he did voluntarily and cheerfully. 
Samuel T. Emmons next testified that Stone came to his house on the night after the funeral of Ballard, and stayed there till morning: that he had been arrested by some soldiers, but had escaped.
Moroni Emmons testified that he slept with Stone on the night that Ballard was murdered: that neither Stone or David Emmons left the house that night: that the witness ate breakfast with both of them on the morning Ballard was killed, between daylight and sunrise: that this was nearly two miles from the place the murder was committed, and that it was impossible for either to have been present when the murder was committed.
McClellan Jones, a brother of Defendant Jones, testified that he was not in company with John G. Jones and Wm. Stanfield at or near the house of Stanfield on the evening before the murder: that he did not see either of them any where on that day: that he saw Ballard on the evening before he was killed: that Ballard was at his house, and only left there about half-past five in the evening: that he went toward the house of Defendant Stanfield in company with O.P. Pierce and Louis Ritchie. 
Thomas Butler, an old citizen and preacher, eighty-four years of age, corroborated the evidence of Jones.
On behalf of Defendant Jones, Mary E. Stanfield testified that her husband was a brother of Wm.
Stanfield: that on the night of the Ballard murder, her husband being absent from home, she had spent the night at the house of Defendant Jones; that she got to his house about dark and with her two little children: that Defendant Jones was in bad health and his wife was helping feed his stock and horses.  She remained in the house all night and that Defendant Jones was not absent from his house while she stayed, and that she remained until after breakfast the next day, when she started home about sunrise. 
Mrs. Sarah E. Jones, wife of Defendant Jones, testified that last witness, Mrs. M.E. Stanfield, did stay at the house of John G. Jones: that he (Jones) was there all the day before and day after the murder of Ballard until about nine o'clock, when word was brought that Ballard had been killed, when Defendant Jones went to see Ballard.  He and Ballard had spent a part of their boyhood together and had always been friends.
Lew Shields testified to having seen the deserter, Anderson, whom Ballard had been in search, fleeing toward Orange County away from the place where the killing was done. This was early in the morning of the murder.
Davis Emmons testified that he saw Defendant Stone on his way to David Emmons' to fill anappointment to preach at David Emmons' the night before the murder.  He also testified that thedefendant, James Archer, was at home taking care of a sick boy on the night of the murder.
Defendant Jones testified that he was at home on the night Ballard was murdered: that Mrs. Mary Stanfield stayed all night at his house: that he had nothing to do, either directly or indirectly, with the killing of Ballard: did not know he was in the neighborhood until he heard he was killed: went to see the remains: did not see either of his co-defendants on that day or night: was not at the house of Albert Qualkenbush on the evening before the murder. 
In defense of James Archer, Mrs. Phillips testified that she was at the house of James Archer on the night of the murder of Ballard: that she had been there about a week helping nurse a sick boy: that James Archer did not leave his house that night: that he was there when she got up the next morning, which was between daylight and sunrise.
George Archer was the sick boy referred to.  He was eight years old.  He corroborated Mrs. Phillips statements, stating that James Archer rested on his bed and took care of him through the night.
Defendant James Archer testified that he was at home all night before the murder of Ballard; did not know he was in the neighborhood until heard he was killed: had nothing to do with the killing: had not seen either of the defendants for several days: was not with any of them, or Albert Quackenbush, the night of the murder.
In defense of Defendant Stanfield, Ann Connell testified that Defendant Stanfield came to her father's house on the evening before the murder and brought his wife and two little children with him: that he remained at her father's house all that night and ate his breakfast there the next morning about daylight: that she heard of the Ballard murder some time the next day.
Wm. Stanfield, son of Defendant Stanfield, corroborated the statements of Ann Connell.  Defendant Stanfield testified that he was not present at the murder of Ballard: that he did not see any of his co-defendants on that day or the next: that he did not see Albert Qualkenbush on the evening before the murder.
Here the Court adjourned until tomorrow at half-past eight o'clock.


The Indianapolis Journal
Thursday, 13 September 1888

Indiana and Illinois News
Close of the Testimony in the Ballard Trial, Now in Progress at Shoals.
Argument to be Begun Today and the Case Given to the Jury Tomorrow

Indiana
Close of the Evidence in the Ballard Murder Case - A Conflict of Testimony
Special to the Indianapolis Journal

SHOALS, Sept. 12. - Promptly at 8 o'clock the Ballard murder trial was called.  Defendant Jones was recalled and cross-examined.  He was asked whether or not, on the day of his arrest for the Ballard murder, he had a  conversation with one Peter Ragle, one of the sheriffs posse who made the arrest concerning the Ballard murder.  When the witness answered that he had, he was asked by the State whether or not in that conversation, he had not said to Ragle that he did not remember that any other than his own family and one Noble Neal had stayed over night at his house on the night of the Ballard murder, Jones replied that he had not said that, either in words or in substance, to Ragle, upon the occasion named.
Peter Ragle was then put on the stand, and testified that Jones did say to him that he did not remember of any one, except the members of his own family, and one Noble Neal, staying at his house on the night of the Ballard murder.
The defense then cross-examined Ragle, who denied that he had had hard feelings toward defendant Jones; he stated also that Jones was one of the County Commissioners of Martin county, and had been such while the witness was county treasurer; that Jones, as one of such commissioners, had caused the books of Ragle to be investigated, and had found a shortage of about $7,000 against him as county treasurer, but that his bondsmen had made good this shortage.
James H. Ballard, a brother of the murdered man, was then called. He testified that in a conversation with defendant Archer, the latter told him that he had been to see Albert Quackenbush, and had talked to him, but was unable to change him in regard to the murder of Ballard; that he still insisted that he (Archer) was at the place of the murder at the time it was committed.
Mrs. Sarah E. Jones was called by the State and cross-examined further, and, among other things, was asked concerning a conversation had at the house of her husband, the defendant Jones, and asked whether or not she had said to Mary Collins that she did not remember of any one staying at her husband's house on the night of the Ballard murder. She answered that she had had no such conversation.
Mrs. Mary Collins testified that Mrs. Jones did make such statements.
Mrs. Sarah Quackenbush was called, and testified that in a certain conversation with her Mrs. Mary Stanfield told her she was not at the house of Jones on the night of the Ballard murder, but at her own home, and that her husband was at home with her.
O. P. Pierce was called by the State, and on being re-examined testified that he was at a funeral along with Ballard on the day before the murder; that he did not see McClellan Jones on that day shake hands with Ballard, and was not in Jones's house on that day; did not see Stanfield shake hands with Ballard when he came to Stanfield's house on the day of the murder; did not see any man standing at the door with his boots off, as if in the act of retiring.
Louis Ritchey was recalled and testified that Ballard did not stop at the house of Jones on the day before the murder.
Here the evidence closed.  The argument will begin tomorrow morning, and will be made as follows, as the matter is now arranged: Lewis Stephens, the deputy prosecutor, will open the argument for the State. and will be followed by Judge Gardiner, of Washington, T. M. Clarke and C. S. Dobbins for the defense. T. J Brooks will close the argument for the State. The case will probably be given to the jury on Friday.


The Nappanee News
13 September 1888

AT Shoals, Ind., a man by the name of Wm. Stanfield, and several other parties, are being tryed for the murder of a Union soldier, by the name of Jackson Ballard, on March 17th, 1864. It seems as though the testimony is liable to convict Stanfield, who it is alledged, did the shooting. It is only another clear illustration of the old but truthful saying that "murder will out." There are times when justice seems very slow in reaching out after some villians, but it will be observed that it "gets there all the same." There's no doubt but what the unseen hand of the Almighty had been shaping circumstances these 24 years in order to more effectively punish the purpctrator of this crime.


The Indianapolis Journal
Friday, 14 September 1888

The Ballard Case in the Jury's Hands,
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, Sept 13. - On the meeting of court this morning, Judge Heffron announced that the argument in the Ballard case would be limited to eight hours, four on each side, and would have to be closed today.  This caused no little flutter among the attorneys in the case, who were all loaded to the muzzle with convincing arguments pro and con.  Thus limited the argument closed at 6:30 o'clock, when Judge Heffron read his instructions to the jury and they retired.
It seems to be the opinion of people who heard the trial that there will be an acquittal or a hung jury.


The Indianapolis Journal
Saturday, 15 September 1888

INDIANA AND ILLINOIS NEWS
The Daily Chronicle of Happenings of Various Kinds in the Two States.
The Ballard Trial Ends in a Verdict of Not Guilty 

INDIANA.
The Jury In the Ballard Murder Case Brings in a Verdict of Not Guilty.
Special to the Indianapolis Journal.

SHOALS, Sept 14. -  At 4 o'clock this afternoon, the jury in the case of the State of Indiana against John G. Jones, Wm. Stanfield, James Archer and John W. Stone for the murder of Jackson Ballard, on the 18th day of July, 1864, brought in the following verdict: " We, the jury, find the defendants not guilty as charged in the indictment."


The New York Tribune
15 September 1888

THE ALLEGED BALLARD MURDERERS AQUITTED

Vincennes, Ind., Sept. 14 (Special)  The jury in the trial of persons charged with assassinating Jackson Ballard were sent out last night at 6 o'clock.  They returned at 3 p.m. today with a verdict, finding the four men accused of the crime not guilty.  A murmur of applause came from the friends of the defendants, but was quickly supressed by the Judge.


 The Illinois Daily Register
15 September 1888

THE KILLING OF BALLARD
Acquittal of the Men on Trial - An Alibi Proven

SHOALS, Ind., Sept. 15 - The jury in the Ballard murder trial brought in a verdict of not guilty yesterday.  The defendants were John Jones, John Stone, William Stanfield and James Archer, who were charged with the killing of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, in 1864.  They were arrested on the evidence of one man, who claimed he was with them at the time.  They are all men of good standing, and it was the general opinion that they would be acquitted.  The defense was an alibi and the proof was strong.


The Wheeling Daily Intelligencer
17 September 1888

The Ballard murder case at Shoals, Ind., was given to the jury Wednesday night, after a long address by Judge Hefron.  They remained out nearly twenty-four hours, and rendered a verdict of not guilty.  There was a good  deal of political sentiment in the case, but it is not believed that it permeated the jury.  The four men accused were released at once.


The Rochester Republican
20 September 1888

THE KILLING OF BALLARD.
Acquittal of the Men on Trial - An Alibi Proven.

SHOALS, Ind., Sept 15.-The jury in the Ballard murder trial brought in a verdict of not guilty yesterday. The defendants were John Jones, John Stone, William Stanfield and James Archer, who were charged with the killing of Jackson Ballard, a Union soldier, in 1864. They were arrested on the evidence of one man, who claimed he was with them at the time. They are all men of good standing, and it was the general opinion that they would be acquitted. The defense was an alibi and the proof was strong.


 The Goshen Weekly News
21 September 1888

Not Guilty
At Shoals, the jury in the case of Indiana against John G. Jones, Wm. Stanfield, James Archer and John W. Stone for the murder of Jackson Ballard, on the 18th day of July. 1864, brought in the following verdict: "We the jury, find the defendants not guilty as charged in the indictment."


 The Orleans Progress Examiner
28 August 1902

Reunion Renaissance.
At the reunion of the old war veterans held here last week the absence of a member of Co. I, 24 Regt., Ind. Vol. reminded them of the cause of his failure to answer the roll call.  The circumstances of the cause may be briefly told as follows:  Jack Ballard than whom there was no braver or more generous comrade, came home with his regiment in 1864 on a veteran furlough.  After the veterans had enjoyed a pleasant time with their home friends and had started back to the front, it was learned that a soldier who was not imbued with a full competency of patriotism had concluded that he had had enough of army life.Jack Ballard was detailed to go back and arrest and bring the recalcitrant with him to his post of duty. 
Jack Ballard in the exercise and performance of his authority, lost his life by being shot from ambush. He had returned to Martin County, Indiana and was searching for the deserter when he was riddled with bullets.
His old comrades at the reunion, in reviewing the past, remembered kind, brave, old Jack and appointed a committee, of which H. L. Waldrip is chairman, to raise a contribution to erect a monument to the memory of their comrade.  Please send what you may be pleased to give to H. L. Waldrip, Orleans, Indiana.
By Order of Com. H. L. WALDRIP, Chairman


The Orleans Progress Examiner
3 January 1907

BONDS
I understand that Charles Ballard, killed at Hillham a few days since, was a brother-in-law of Enos O. Kirk, of Northwest township.
He was a nephew of Jack Ballard, who was waylaid and killed In Martin county during the war. Jack was a soldier who came home to get deserters. Several men were tried for killing him, but all came clear.


The Loogootee Tribune
24 May 1907

COUNTY SEAT NEWS
MARTIN COUNTY'S HONOR ROLL .

On the eve of Memorial day it may be interesting to recount those who gave up their lives for their country during the ciyil war. The following is a partial list of Martin county's sons who died that their flag might wave over a united land. It is impossible to procure a complete list.
Incomplete records of Company I of the 24th Regiment show two soldiers, Francis Ballard and Asa Evans killed at Magnolia Hills. The only soldier of the civil war killed in Martin county while in line of duty, Jackson Ballard, belonged to this company. He was murdered March 18, 1864 while hunting deserters. His murderers were never captured.


The Washington Herald
30 September 1910

Jack Ballard, who was murdered while on the way to his home near Shoals during the war times, was a member of company I, and the incidents of his killing, together with a trial of several of the citizens of Martin county a few years ago charged with the crime, can be recited in detail by most every one of his comrades now living hereabouts.
The murder of Ballard was similar in many respects to that of Captain McCarty in the neighborhood of High Rock, this county, along about the same time.


 The Washington Herald
5 July 1915

The Golden Circle
Carlos T. McCarty, the talented Shoals correspondent of the Martin County Tribune, has the following article in the Tribune concening the Knights of the Golden Circle:

"The treasonable organization existing during the late civil war and  known as The Knights of the Golden Circle was eradicated largely through the efforts of two Martin county men.  One of these was Captain Henry Henley, who died a few years ago at Bloomington.  He came to Shoals before the civil war with General Wilder, who established him in the milling business.  Captain Henley was one of the men who platted the town of Shoals, then known as Memphis.  When the civil war commenced he organized a company which became Company A of the Seventeenth Indiana regiment and was attached to Wilder's brigade.
These soldiers were mounted infantry and did some of the most effective fighting of 1862 that Captain Henley returned from the front to Shoals for a short visit.  One night he was awakened by a knock on the door and found that Wesley Tranter, one of his company who was home on a furlough, wanted to see him.
Tranter, at the hour of midnight, related to Captain Henley the secrets of the Knights of the Golden Circle.  He had been induced to attend a meeting, being told it was simply a political gathering.  The meeting was held in a school building near Shoals.  When he found out the real character of the meeting he determined to go as far as possible into the secrets of the organization in order that he might be able to disrupt the treasonable circle.  He attended four meetings, the last ones being held at the home of Stephen Horsey.
"At the last meeting the full strength of the organization was revealed to Tranter.  Also the plans which included an attempt to capture the United States arsenal at Indianapolis.  The southern prisoners at Columbus, O., and Springfield, Mo. were also to be released.  Southern Indiana, southern Ohio and Missouri were well organized and were ready to make the attempt.  Tranter had especial knowledge of the lodges in Martin, Sullivan, Brown, Daviess and Orange counties, Indiana.  Correspondence was being regularly carried on between the lodges and the organization did fair to become strong enough to throw  those portions of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois which were infested with the nefarious circle to the confederate column.
"By the time Tranter had told his story fully to Henley it was almost daylight and it was agreed between the two that they would go to Indianapolis at once and lay the matter before Governor Morton. The first train out of Shoals carried the two men to the capital of the state where they had a consultation with General Carrington.  A sworn statement was made of the affair by Henley and Tranter.  This was written at the old Bates house, on the corner now occupied by the Claypool hotel in Indianapolis. This being done Henley and Tranter returned to Shoals.  Governor Morton was not in Indianapolis that day and immediately upon his arrival General Carrington laid before him the statement which he had secured. This was the first information which had been procured in the matter which was considered at all reliable, although the military authorities were aware that such an orgarization existed in southern Indiana.
"The following Saturday morning the people of Shoals were surprised when a special trainload of soldiers pulled into town.  The soldiers immediately left the cars and started out in different directions.  Within thirty minutes all the roads leading to town were being patrolled by armed soldiers.  People who were coming to town were allowed to come in without any ceremony, but when they started to return they were halted at the point of a loaded gun and forced to return to town. This means was taken to prevent the information that the town was occupied by the military from reaching the country.  Before the day was over about thirty men were in the custody of the soldiers.  They were taken to the train occupied by the troops as fast as they were arrested.  One man, named Coffield was supposed to have important information which he would not divulge and he was taken out by the soldiers and hanged to a tree until almost dead, but he refused to divulge anything concerning the organization. One of the last men arrested was Stephen Horsey who was generally supposed to be the ringleader of the Martin county rebels.  He, with the others, was afterward tried at Indianapolis for treason and was sentenced to be hanged.  After the scaffold had been constructed on which he was to be executed he was reprieved and in his later years, broken in purse and spirit he made his home at the county farm near Dover Hill, where he died a dozen or more years ago.  Tranter lived in constant fear of assassination for his part in the affair but died peacefully near Shoals a few years after the war. The service he rendered to the union in this matter was one of the greatest rendered by any Indiana soldier. The danger he cheerfully assumed was much greater than that of the battlefield, as was shown by the murder of Jack Ballard and Captain McCarty by the Golden Circle assassins.  But he was a soldier and assumed his dangerous duties with the true spirit.  He played a great part in the fearful tragedy of the civil war and his deed should never be forgot."


The Loogootee Martin County Tribune
22 March 1923

NEWS FROM SHOALS

Carlos T. McCarty; Correspondent
A LOST ARSENAL

During the troublous days of the civil war, Martin county was not altogether loyal to the North. There were many Southern sympathizers to be found in the county.  The organizers of that treasonable body of men commonly known as the Knights of the Golden Circle found much material in our county.  The organization seemed to head about Shoals and most of their members were found either there or between there and the south-eastern part of the county.  The story of the Knights of the Golden Circle has been told time and again. It was a Martin county man who furnished the government with the evidence that finally was used to disrupt the organization.  Of the three men Bowles, Milligan and Horsey, who were tried for treason against the government and condemned to be hanged, one, Stephen Horsey, was a Shoals man.  Fortunes of war came to their aid and even after the scaffold had been erected on which they were to pay the penalty for levying treason against the government and furnishing aid and comfort to its enemies, they were pardoned.  Horsey spent the greater part of his after life in Martin county and died an inmate of the county asylum a number of years ago.
The knights were strong in Shoals and its vicinity and their organization here was of such a character that the government sent troops here who placed the entire community under martial law, placed guards at all the highways leading out of town and took away with them when they left a number of citizens. It was just about the time of this raid that the arsenal which was being established in Shoals, disappeared. Just where it was that the Knights had selected to store their guns was exactly never known, but it was always understood that they were stored near an old home on the West Side. The building is standing yet.  Whether the guns, of which there was a considerable number, were hidden in the house or in an old log barn, which used to stand near the residence, was never told by those who knew and as they have all since passed over the trail to the land from whence no traveler never returns, absolute knowledge will probably never be secured.  About the time the government officials were busily engaged in running down the organization, it became known that troops would soon be in Shoals and would make a search for the guns which were being stored there and which were to be shipped to the South if it was not found possible to use them in the plot which had been laid to capture Indianapolis and free the rebel prisoners who were held there. 
When the news reached Shoals it caused immediate consternation among those who were implicated in the plot. They realized that to be found not only to be members of the order but also to be engaged in storing arms for use against the government, would most probably mean that they would soon face a firing squad.  So under cover of darkness the guns were all removed and hidden.  It has always been the tradition that they were taken to the river and sunk in its waters at a point about opposite the high school building.  None of them have ever been found and it may be that they were otherwise disposed of.  But the story of the throwing of the rifles into the river has always had all the ear marks of the truth and maybe some day chance will bring them to light again. However they were never used to fire a shot against the old stars and stripes.
Blood was shed however in the cause in Martin and Daviess counties.  Jack Ballard was cruelly murdered being shot from ambush in Lost River township, in Martin county, while back in the recruiting service. This murder was instigated by the order of Knights.  Captain Eli McCarty met a like fate in south-eastern Daviess county while back from the front on official duty.  These were the only two men who were killed in these two counties who died on the field of battle.  Attempts were made to kill others. One man being waylaid between Shoals and Dover Hill when he was back hunting deserters, but who fortunately escaped his enemies.
The old Golden Circle spirit has forever died in the county and when the call was made for men and money for the world war the entire county rallied to the support of the stars and stripes and whatever stain may have been placed on the escutceon of the county by disloyalty during the war of the rebellion, was wiped out when the call for duty came and Martin county responded so nobly in the War of the Nations.
Never again, no matter what the occasion, is it likely that treason will be found among our people. They are all loyal to the inmost thought and but few counties can show a more valient record in the Great War than that of our own.


The Indianapolis Sunday Star
Sunday, 23 June 1929

Knights of the Golden Circle Crushed Through Personal Sacrifice of Shoals Man Who Died Unhonored and Unsung

By John T. Harris
Had it not been for the activity of Oliver P. Morton, Indiana's war-time Governor, and the extreme Union loyalty of Wesley Tranter, of Shoals, immediately following the murder of Jack Ballard of Martin county and Capt. Eli McCarty of Daviess county as a result of the fantastic scheme for the subjugation of Mexico and the formation of a strong and an autocratic government of the Mason-Dixon states and Mexico itself with all or part of Central America as it's territory, the Knights of the Golden Circle would still be fresh before the minds of every citizen of Indiana and the United States.
This organization had it's origin in this section and it's doings were shadowed in mystery. In fact, the secret and mysterious functions of the order were devised to appeal to the emotionalimagination, especially of men of the North who were advocates of Negro-slavery and desired the success of the states forming the rebelling Confederacy.
Others Drawn In.
There were others too, who were drawn into the occult, dark and mystic realm of the Golden Circle for political reasons, men who believed the war would destroy the doctrine of state rights.  They thought first of their association and attachments to party and were loath to see brought about what seemed to them it's certain destruction.
Many of these simply were partisans of a political organization.  But the leaders in Indiana were men who would go to any length to help the South.When the organization began to spread out from this section Harrison H. Dodd of Indianapolis became it's leader.  Others of the early officers were Horace Heffren, a newspaper man of Salem, Col. W.A. Bowles of French Lick, John C. Walker of LaPorte and L.P. Milligan of Huntington.  Andrew Humphreys of Greene county was an influential member as was Stephen Horsey of Shoals.  Daniel W. Voorhees of 
Terre Haute was known to be high among the ranks of this organization.
Assemblage Broken Up.
These men attempted to address an organization meeting at Indianapolis one night just a few days before the murder in this section and the assemblage was broken up by Union sympathizers, hundereds of the participants being arrested and disarmed.  These foes of the Union finally became so numerous and the trouble in this section gave so much annoyance to Governor Morton that he took steps to break up the knights with their last midnight gatherings, blood bound oaths and disloyal intentions.The leaders were arrested, tried and sentenced, some of them to death, some to imprisonment, but the surrender of Lee to Grant at Appomattox stopped the fratricidal struggles between the North and the South, and then Governor Morton gave his efforts to freeing the convicted men.
The first outward demonstration of the Golden Circle was that upon Capt. Eli McCarty, who was at home just south of this city recovering from a wound received in the battle of Perrysville, Ky.  He was commissioned by Governor Morton to serve notices on drafted men in Daviess county.
Organized Home Guards.
Before entering the service Capt. McCarty had organized a company of home guards in theneighborhood just south of Washington, and many Washington men belonged to this company.  The only known living man of this organization and who can tell at first hand the events of that day is Dr. R.S. Mitchell of this city, who was taught by Capt. McCarty to beat the drum for the home guards.  This little drummer boy, now 74 years old, beat the prolonged and tremulous chords of the "dead roll" on the drum Capt. McCarty taught him to use at the grave after the body had been taken from the river just south of Washington.
It was about 1 o'clock in the afternoon of Oct. 3 1864, that Capt.McCarty started down the road on horseback to execute the orders of Governor Morton.  He had been warned that the task was one surrounded by danger and his answer was;  "I can not shirk my duty as a soldier and citizen."
A short distance from the home of William Jackson Sr., where McCarty had his noonday meal, the sharp report of a rifle was heard and within a few minutes two men came up the lane by the Jackson home and exclaimed to Mr. Jackson, "We have killed McCarty and if you tell of it, we'll serve you in like manner."

Jackson did not immediately give the alarm through fear of personal harm, but as the hours went by he conferred with Dr. John S. Mitchell, captain of the home guards.  Capt. Mitchell immediately sent out a call for the assembling of these home protectors and he came to Washington and communicated with Governor Morton with the result that he was authorized to make any and all arrests he deemed wise in order to apprehend the murderers.
The two hundred men started a search for the body of McCarty, as all were in the belief that he had been mudered, his horse having been found and blood stains in the saddle.  Blood was found at the intersection of the road and also evidence was found that the body had been concealed near that spot until the cover of nightfall on the day of the murder.
The searchers found traces that something had been dragged along the road and it later developed that the body of McCarty had been dragged from it's hiding place after night to a point in the east fork of White river known as "Belue Hole"
Body Brought Up.
Here ropes were tied around the body and a rock weighing more than sixty pounds was fastened in a big palmetto hat and this was dropped into the water.  Dr. Mitchell was a good swimmer and diver and after a considerable length of time the body was brought forth from this deep hole.
Examination disclose that a rifle bullet had entered the muscle of the left arm near the shoulder passing between the officer's ribs and severing the arch of the aorta and this caused almost instant death.
Military law was at once declared, arrests of suspected persons were made and among the first of these was John Whitesides who turned state's evidence and told the story of the plot and murder.  Whitesides had a small saloon in this county in which some of the meetings of the Knights of the Golden Circle were held.
Hid in Oak Tree.
The shot that ended Capt. McCarty's life was fired by a young man by the name of John McAvoy, 18 years old, a member of the knights, who was considered an expert rifle shot.  McAvoy hid himself behind the stump of a white oak tree in a fence corner and, as Capt. McCarty came down the road, he fired the shot thst was heard in every section of the United States.  He was among the number who escaped and was located at St. Joe, Mo.  Later he returned to Indiana, confessed the crime and died in prison in Indianapolis.  Several others who made their escape at the same time joined Quantrell's band of guerrilas in the West.
The legend on the simple slab that stands at the head of Capt. McCarty's grave in famous old Ebenezer cemetery just south of Washington reflects the temper of the time when political passions were high and southern Indiana had such a sinister mixture of Southern sympathizers, as it bears the following: "In memory of Eli McCarty Captain of Co. G. 42d reigement Indiana Volunteers  Born Nov. 26, 1826 Killed Oct. 3, 1864 by eight peace Democrats while notifying drafted men."  "He enlisted in the service of his country Sept. 23, 1860, was wounded at the battle of Perryville, Oct. 8, 1861.  Resigned March 6, 1862.  He was a volunteer and served in the Mexican war."  "All things work together for good those who love and serve God."
Look Up Deserter.
Louisa McCarty, his wife who died Nov. 26, 1865, for many months after the murder of her husband, insisted that the names of the men whom she was convinced made way with him be placed upon the marker, but finally was persuaded to abandon the thought.
About the same time of the McCarty murder, Jack Ballard, Lou Ritchie and O.P. Pierce were sent into Martin county to notify the drafted men that their services were needed in the Union army.  After their arrival at Natchez, which is on present State-Road 150 a few miles west of the famous West Baden and French Lick watering places, they gave their attention particularly to the looking up of Allen Anderson, a deserter.
The men did not have the success in locating the deserter and drafted soldiers that they had expected and several days were spent with no results.The incident that is believed to have hastened the death of Ballard was brought about while he was passing the home of "Bill" Stanfield, a Southern sympathizer, who lived near what is known as Salt Peter Cave, where in later years the famous Archer gang placed William Bunch on a ledge of rock and riddled his body with bullets in order to seal his tongue.
Tears Rebel Flag.
Stanfield had exposed a rebel flag and, as Ballard passed down the road, he noticed it. He became enraged and, leaping from his horse, tore the flag from it's fastenings, and ripping it into ribbons trampled it beneath his feet.
The next morning he left his home about 6 o'clock and had proceeded in his man hunt not more than a half hour when a number of shots were heard and Ballard's horse came galloping back home minus it's rider.
Search was made and Ballard's body was found in the road carrying the marks of seventeen bullets, six of these from his own army revolver, having penetrated his head.  Ballard was buried in what was known as Hawkins graveyard, but today there are no markers in the plot, it being used as a cornfield this spring.
Several years later as the outgrowth of a neighborhood row, a man by the name of Albert Quackenbush appeared before the Martin county grand jury and offered such evidence as caused the indictment of John G. Jones, James Archer, William Stanfield and Dr. John Stone for the murder of Ballard.  There was no direct evidence against these men except that offered by Quackenbush, and the jury returned a verdict of not guilty.
Morton Acts.
The two murders of the Union officers coming so close upon each other attracted the attention of Governor Morton who concluded that drastic steps should be taken.
As a result of the Governor's action Wesley Tranter of the Shoals neighborhood arrived home one afternoon from services in Dixie.  He immediately caused to be circulated that word that he had been drummed out of the Union army and that he had been dishonorably discharged, and the like, and for several days the friends of Mr. Tranter had little or nothing to do with him.
It was not long, however, until he fell into the good graces of the officers of the Knights of the Golden Circle.  he joined that organization, secured it's membership list, particularly the officers, found out the places throughout this section of Indiana where ammunition and guns and other equipment that were to be sent to the Confederate forces were stored and then without any announcement left the neighborhood.
Boy Is Halted.
The next day a trainload of soldiers came from the east over the Ohio and Mississippi Railroad and stopped about half a mile east of the town of Shoals.  Soldiers on double-quick surrounded the town and within a few minutes this section received its first taste of military law. All persons could enter the line of soldiers, but no one could leave. 
Little had been said by the officers in charge of the soldiers as to the purpose of the visit until 10-year-old Pete Yenne, who had come to town with a wagon load of cane to convert into molasses and drawn by two yoke of oxen, concluded it was time for him to go home. Yenne, who is now a citizen of Danville approached the line of soldiers at what is known as the crossing of Beaver Creek.  He was halted, of course, and told he could not pass out of the line.
Defended By Garfield.
The youngster tried to convince the officers with the aid of an ox gad that he was wanted at home to procure the back logs and the like for the mother who was sustaining the home while the father and other sons were in the service.
After reconciling the chap he was induced to point the way to the home of Harry Connell, one of the leaders of the Knights of the Golden Circle, which was located on what is now known as Indiana State Road 150.
During that night, Connell, Milligan, Bowles and Horsey were arrested and taken to a point east of Shoals known as  Grassy Point.  Here the soldiers made an effort to extract confessions but were unsuccessful.  At the trials, which were held in Indianapolis, all of the arrested men were defended by James A. Garfield, who later became a national character in the United States.
Another murder that was laid at the door of the Golden Circle was that of Pleasant Hart, a harmless and kind Negro, whose body was found one morning riddled with bullets.
The work executed by Mr. Tranter naturally brought down upon his head the condemnation of the friends of the arrested traitors and other members of the Knights of the Golden Circle and for some four or five months after these arrests Tranter remained in the home of Governor Morton at Indianapolis. 

With this article are seven photos. The captions read as follows:

1.  Jack Ballard, who was slain near Natchez in Martin county while notifying drafted men.  Members of the Knights of the golden Circle were blamed for the murder.
2.  The church at Ebenezer cemetery from which the funeral of Capt. Eli McCarty was held.  Remnants of Company G, 42d regiment Indiana volunteers gathered here annually on the date of the murder.
3.  Wesley Tranter, civil war veteran of Shoals, through whose efforts the organization in Indiana was crushed and who died unhonored by the government.
4.  Dr. H.S. Mitchell of Washington, who as a boy, 10 years old, was taught to drum by Capt. McCarty, beat the death roll at the Captain's grave.
5.  S.P. Yenne, now living at Danville, as a boy, 10 years old, led a party of Union soldiers to the home of Harry Connell, one of the leaders.  Later as a sheriff of Martin county, Mr. Yenne sered warrants on men charged with the murder of Jack Ballard.
6.  Capt. McCarty, who was murdered by members of the Knights of the Golden Circle.
7.  This stone marks the grave of Capt. McCarty in the old Ebenezer cemetery, south of Washington.


History of Martin County Indiana
Harry Q. Holt 1953

Chapter XVII - Page 295
TWENTY - FOURTH Co. I
Jackson Ballard, James Ballard, Francis Ballard

Regimental History

Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry. - Cols., Alvin P. Hovey, William T. Spicely; Lieut. -Cols., John Gerber, William T. Spicely, Richard F. Barter, John F. Grill, Francis A. Sears, William S. Pollard; Majs., Cyrus C. Hines, William T. Spicely, Richard F. Barter, John F. Grill, Francis M. Redburn, David Kelly.
This regiment was organized at Vincennes and was mustered in July 31, 1861. It left the state Aug. 19, joined Fremont's army at St. Louis, and moved to the interior of Missouri. In Feb., 1862, it was ordered to Fort Donelson and reached Paducah the day after its surrender. It then moved to Fort Henry and later joined Grant's army at Pittsburg landing. It was conspicuously engaged at the battle of Shiloh, where Lieut. -Col. Gerber fell. Col. Hovey was appointed brigadier- general on April 28, and Maj. Spicely was commissioned colonel.The regiment participated in the siege of Corinth, moving from there to Memphis and then was transferred to Helena, Ark., where it remained until the spring of 1863, engaging in numerous minor expeditions through Arkansas and was in many skirmishes. It moved with Hovey's division of the 13th corps to the siege of Vicksburg and was in nearly all the skirmishes and battles of that campaign, including Port Gibson and Champion's hill, charging and defeating the enemy at the latter place. It was in the trenches before Vicksburg from May 19 to July 4, and was then stationed at and near New Orleans until Jan. 1, 1864.
It reenlisted as a veteran organization in January and returned home on furlough. It passed the year at various points in Louisiana, and while at Morganza in December the 67th regiment was consolidated with it. It was transferred to Barrancas, Fla., in Jan., 1865, participated in the investment of Mobile, took part in the battles about Fort Blakely and in the assaults made upon the enemy's works was the first to place its colors thereon. It was then sent to Selma, Ala., and afterwards to Galveston, Tex.
On July 16, the regiment was reorganized as a battalion of five companies, the other five being made up largely of men who had enlisted prior to Oct., 1862, in the 24th and 67th, and were mustered out July 19.
The battalion remained at Galveston until mustered out on Nov. 15, 1865. The original strength was 1,053; recruits, 377; reenlistments, 343; total, 1,773. Loss by death, 251; desertion, 61; unaccounted for, 161.
Regimental history taken from "The Union Army" by Federal Publishing Company, 1908 - Volume 3