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Monroe County

Surname - 'h' - Biographies


BENJAMIN HALL is a native of Richland Township, Monroe Co., Ind; was born October 1, 1826; is the son of F. V. and Polly (Noel) Hall; in a family of twelve children he is the seventh, and is of Irish German origin.  The father of our subject was born in Kentucky and his mother was of Virginia birth.  His paternal grandfather was Francis Hall, a native of Scotland, who came to American prior to the Revolution.  About the year 1820, his father came to Monroe County, and settled in Richland Township, where he died in 1854.  Mr. Hall remained at home and worked for his father on the farm until his twenty-eighth year.  In 1854, Mr. Hall was married to Miss Nancy Cox, a native of Owen County, Ind. By this lady he became the father of six children Martha E., Allie A., Biddy P., Aurilla P., Morton M. and Edith E.  Mrs. Hall died August 24 1883, a consistent member of the Primitive Baptist Church.  Mr. Hall settled on his farm in Richland Township in 1855.  In the fall of 1882, he removed to Bloomington to educate his children.  Politically, he is a Republican, and a member of the Primitive Baptist Church.  He is an honorable man, and a highly respected Citizen.  By occupation, his life has been that of a farmer, and in which he has been successful.  He has a well improved farm in Richland Township. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 628

 

JOSEPH HALL is the third son and child in a family of five children, and was born February 11, 1855, in Richland Township, Monroe County, Ind. His parents, Bainbridge and Elizabeth C. (Houston) Hall, were born in Monroe County. Joseph was reared in Richland Township until he attained his majority, receiving meanwhile a good education in the district schools. In 1876, he entered the employ of a farmer in Bloomington Township, and remained with him for two years, when he was engaged to work for another farmer. He then went to Montgomery, Ind., where he stayed for two years, returning thence to the old home farm. About two years later, he rented a farm of 187 acres of good land in Bean Blossom Township, Monroe County, and engaged in agricultural pursuits for more than two years. He was appointed Deputy Recorder (to his brother, William N. Hall) of Monroe County, and is at present in the faithful discharge of the duties devolving upon him. Mr. Hall is a member of the I. O. R. M., Arizona Tribe, No. 52. He is a Republican, a liberal citizen, and highly esteemed by all who know him. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 568

 

WILLIAM N. HALL, a native of Monroe County, Ind./, was born March 20, 1853, four miles north of Bloomington. His parents, Bainbridge and Elizabeth C. (Houston) Hall, natives of Monroe County, Ind., after their marriage located on a farm in Richland Township, remaining for thirty-four years. His mother died January 29, 1875, and his father at present resides in Bloomington. William is the second son and child in a family of five children. He was reared and received a good education in his native county. At the age of eighteen years, he entered the graded schools in Ellettsville, where he remained for about two years. In 1873, he was appointed Deputy Postmaster there, and after serving for a short time entered the employ of Smith & McDonald, harness,makers of Newark, Greene County, continuing one year. In the fall of 1874, he returned to the farm in Monroe County, and five years later he was again appointed to his former position of Deputy Postmaster at Ellettsville, serving for more than two years. He was afterward elected by the Republican party Recorder of Monroe County, and is at present actively engaged in the discharge of his official duties. He is a member of the I. O. R. M., Arizona Tribe, No. 52. On July 17, 1874, he was precipitated from a grade on the Louisville, New Albany & Chicago Railroad, at Evansville, dislocating his right hip, which incapacitated him for manual labor. He is a noble principled man, esteemed as a citizen, and efficient as an officer. - Counties of Morgan, Monroe and Brown, Indiana Historical and Biographical, By Charles Blanchard, Published by F. A. Battey & Co, 1884, Page 568