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Eighth Annual Report of the Waveland Public Schools, Waveland, Indiana for the School Year Ending March 27, 1896 -- there will also be annual reports from this book up through 1902

1897 -- 1898 --

Special thanks to Dave F and Trevor P for bringing me this awesome book -- Dave & I have decided we're appointing Trevor as the official Waveland Junior Historian :)

Note: I'll be adding to this as time progresses !!! I'm sooo excited - something I'd not seen before. MAKE SURE YOU REFRESH the page to get updates of what's been added :) ENJOY

Click here for other years :) ENJOY! 1897 - 1898 - 1899 -


Calendar for 1896-97

First Term Begins............... Monday, September 14, 1896
Thanksgiving Holidays ...... November 25 to November 30, 1896
First Term Ends.................. Thursday, December 24, 1896
Second Term Begins............Monday, January 3, 1897
Annual Commencement......April 1897
School Closes.......................April 1897


Board of Trustees

F.N. Johnson ........................... President
S.M. McNutt..............................Secretary
T.L. Hanna............................... Treasurer
C.A. Kleiser.............................. Township Trustee

Superintendent.................. Geo. L. Guy

Corps of Teachers

George L. Guy........................ Sup't and Senior and Junior Years
Eunice B. Little......................Freshman Class and Eight Year
Laura Spencer ...................... Second Intermediate Department
Hintie Wray...........................First Intermediate Department
Anna Anderson......................Second Primary Department
Allie M. Bland........................First Primary Department

Librarian ............................... Gertie Hendrickson

Janitor....................................T.W. Wilson


Roll of Teachers, Trustees and Superintendents since beginning the issue of the Annual Reports, 1888

TEACHERS

1888-89................................................................................1891-92
J.B. Evans ....................................................................... J.B. Evans

C.A. Kleiser......................................................................C.A. Kleiser
Nannie A. Hanna.............................................................Nannie A. Harris
T.Y. Hall..........................................................................Laura Spencer
Lillie B. Dowdall..............................................................Alice Kashner
..........................................................................................Mary Oglevee

1889-90 ..............................................................................1892-93
J.B. Evans........................................................................O.P. Foreman
C.A. Kleiser......................................................................C.A. Kleiser
Kate Moore......................................................................Laura Spencer
Minnie LeCraw.................................................................H.F. Johnson
Emma Russell..................................................................Lulu Milligan
..........................................................................................Mary J. Lowry

1890-91................................................................................1893-94
J.B. Evans..........................................................................Walter Dunn
C.A. Kleiser.......................................................................Effie Preston
H.F. Johnson.....................................................................Laura Spencer
Bertha Ghormley..............................................................Lillian Wilson
Laura Spencer..................................................................Margaret Jones
..........................................................................................Maye Handlen

1894-95................................................................................. .1895-96
Walter Dunn.....................................................................Walter Dunn
Effie Preston......................................................................Belle Mills
Laura Spencer...................................................................Laura Spencer
Jennie Burford..................................................................Allie McMahon
Emma Griest.....................................................................Jennie Burford
Lizzie Morrison.................................................................Harriet Hendricks

TRUSTEES

F.N. Johnson, President..................................................1898-97
J.O. McCormick, Secretary..............................................1888-96
S.M. McNutt, Secretary....................................................1896-97
T.L. Hanna, Treasurer.....................................................1888-89
A.J. Wolfe, Treasurer.......................................................1889-90
T.L. Hanna, Treasurer.....................................................1890-97
Dr. Z. Ball, Township Trustee..........................................1889-90
A.J. Wolfe, Township Trustee..........................................1890-95
C.A. Kleiser, Township Trustee........................................1895-97

SUPERINTENDENTS

J.B. Evans..........................................................................1888-92
? P. Foreman.....................................................................1892-93
Walter Dunn.....................................................................1893-96
George L. Guy....................................................................1896-97


TRUSTEE's REPORT

To the patrons and friends of the Waveland Schools..... The Eight Annual Report of Trustees is hereby presented to the patrons of the Waveland Schools and to the public. And we feel that there has been no step taken backward. The school has made a general advance in the increasing number of students and efficience of their work and it is the desire of the Board to furnish the school with all the necessary supplies to make the school as successful as any of its character in the state. The Board has employed for the coming year the services of Prof. George L. Guy, late Professor in Austin College, Effingham, Ill; a gentleman of scholarly attainments and an experience of 24 years of successful teaching in the public schools of our country. We consider this a rare opportunity for students desiring instruction in advanced studies. So, with our reading room, with the best periodicals of the day, an increasing library, new apparatus, and the hearty cooperation of teachers, patrons and friends, we hope to make each succeeding year better than the past.
Respectuflly, F.N. Johnson, Pres; T.L. Hanna, Treas; S.M. McNutt, Sec; C.A. Kleiser, Township Trustee.

Note from typist, Karen Bazzani Zach: F.N. Johnson is Fountain North; T.L. Hanna is Tyree Littleton; S.M. McNutt is Samuel; C.A. Kleiser is Charles Albert.


SUPERINTENDENT's REPORT

To the Honorable Board of Waveland School Trustees

Gentlemen:

I respectfully submit to you the Eighth Annual Report of the Waveland Schools, it being the Third Annual Report submitted to you by me. The schools opened Sept 9, '95 and closed March 27, '96 containing 140 days. Although the term was shorter than usual we have had a successful year's work. The enrollment for the year was good and the attendance excellent - better I think than any previous year in the history of the school. We attribute the success of the past school year to the co-operation of teachers, patrons and school officers. Harmony and unity of purpose has reigned throughout. The teachers worked harmoniously for the betterment of the school; and the pupils showed a spirit of interest, earnestness and devotion to work. The work of the different teachers was the same as for the two preceding years.

Teachers -- There were three new teachers in the schools. After the selection of teachers for the year, Miss Preston, the HS teacher, resigned to accept a position in the South Bend schools, Miss Mills was selected to fill her place. One resignation took place after the schools had begun. Miss Scott resigned to accept a position in the Terre Haute schools, and Miss McMahon of Crawfordsville was selected to take her place. Miss Hendricks of the Primary department was the other new teacher. We feel that a frequent change of teachers, as a rule, is unfortunate for the schools and should be avoided whenever possible. The conscientious teacher who is well-equipped for teaching and who knows the pupils is decidedly better qualified to teach the pupils than the teacher who is a stranger to them.

General Exercises -- Chapel exercises were held Monday morning of each week at which all were required to be present. These exercises were usually led by some minister of the town or some visiting minister and consisted of singing, scripture reading and prayer. On each of the other mornings of the week exercises were held in each room. It was the aim that the morning exercises should not only get the pupils in the right attitude for the day's work but that it should hold out a little lesson to each one. We feel that they were very helpful.

Teacher's Meetings -- Teachers' meeting was held every Monday evening immediately after the close of school. At this time reports were made and matters of discipline and instruction were discussed. It was also a time for a general exchange of ideas on any subject connected with our work. THe interest shown at these meetings showed the interest the teachers had in their work. A written monthly report was made by each teacher to the Superintendent, showing the number enrolled, average attendance and a number of other points. The teachers did the township institute work with the township teachers, taking an active part in all the work and discharging all duties assigned. This they did without pay and because of their interest in school work.

Instruction and Discipline - The character of the instruction given, for the most part, was excellent and results obtained very gratifying. Only teachers of experience and at least with some professional training were employed. These worked harmoniously together seeking better ways, and in this way the peculiar excellencies of individual teachers were brought to the notice of others and by mutual example and assistance, free from rivalries and jealousies, all became sharers in whatever was found most useful in matters of instruction and discipline. The teachers studied McMurry's General Method in the institute work for the year and we think the idea of education as given in that book was brought out in some degree at least in the school work. The idea of moral character building was the deep underlying principle governing teaching. Much credit is due the teachers for the faithful and intelligent way in which they have done the work assigned them. We followed the course of study as outlined in the last Annual Report: this is practically the same as the State Course of Study. It simply suggests the work to be done in a given time and the teacher is left to present the work in the best possible way. For several reasons very little attempt was made to dictate methods to be pursued in presenting the work. It is thought that elaborate directions are unnecessary for the experienced teacher and very difficult to follow by the inexperienced. The individuality of the teacher must not be destroyed. We believe the instruction was upon a high plane of excellency with method and conscientious teachers back of it. The discipline of the school is in good condition. Severe punishment was resorted to in only a few cases. The true idea of school govenment is being more and more impressed upon, teachers and pupils alike. All occasion for the use of force as well as all inclination to use it are rapidly being elminated from practice in the schools. In the matter of discipline we feel we have had the hearty cooperation of parents and this has been very gratifying indeed.

Improvements - It has been my pleasure each year in the Annual Report to note some new improvement. Before school began last fall some papering and painting was done, which was very helpful to the appearance of the building. The reading room which was tried as an experiment the year before was continued and was even more of a success than the previous year. A new globe was purchased also a new dictionary and holder for the HS. The work in Physics was almost revolutionzed by the purchase of a good supply of physical apparatus. This was carefully selected and proved very efficient. A suitable case for this apparatus was also purchased. A number of new volumes were also added to the library. Concertining the reading room and library we will have some to say in another place. Enrollment for entire school was larger than ever before. I call your attention to the following statistical report, which shows the numerical standing of the school.

Year # Students enumerated # Students enrolled Ave attendance # Enrolled in HS
1887-88 175 110.7 4
1888-89 303 220 165.5 11
1889-90 322 235 170 12
1890-91 326 237 186 13
1891-92 332 238 176 17
1892-93 329 224 175 22
1893-94 347 227 170 27
1894-95 343 221 175 30
1895-96 264 241 180 32

By the abovr report, you see the enrollment in the HS has steadily increased from the beginning. The average daily attendance has been gradually increasing and considering that the scarlet fever was twice in the school in the course of the year, the average daily attendance is very good. This we hope will continue to do until every young man and young woman in Waveland have availed themselves of the opportunity of securing a good HS education

Promotions -- Four bi-monthly examinations were held in the course of the year. Those pupils doing good class work and passing their examinations were promoted. No promotion cards were given but each pupils name appears in the catalogue in the grade in which the pupil properly belongs. It has been the aim of the teachers to impress upon the pupils the importance of doing the work not for the same of passing but for the sake of the work. One thing which was a cause of sadness to the teachers and pupils was the death of Ina Britton, a pupil in the Intermediate Department. THis I believe is the first death which has occurred in the school, while school was in session, since my connection with the school. This young lady has left a vacancy in the hearts of teachers and schoolmates and will be held in grateful remembrance by them. Proper recognition of her worth was shown at the time of her death by suitable memorials and resolutions.

*****

COURSE OF STUDY

The course of study this year remains practically the same that it was last. It being laid out by the month for each teacher it has been found the most suitable course to follow. It is a fact to be deplored that the term was cut short one month for lack of funds. The course was laid out for 8 months and teachers, for the great part of the year, worke dupon that basis. It should be the aim to provide, if possible, for emergencies like the one you were compelled to confront this year. We think 8 months should be the minimum so far as the length of term concerned.

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- READING

First Month - Teach the child to recognize at sight the written and printed forms of words found in its printed vocabulary by combining the object, the picture and the word. Ideas precede words. Cultivate memory and perception. Use charts, objects, pictures. First Reader to Lesson 4.

Second Month - Write a list of words from which make easy sentences. Have pupils distinguish words by pointing them out on the page, board, slate or chart. Compare script and printed forms of letters and words. First Reader to Lesson 14. Review on chart.

Third Month -- Use pictures and objects to awaken an interest and have pupils talk about them. Give slate exercises. See that the pupils have sharp pencils and ruled slates. Give attention to the sounds of vowels. First Reader completed to Lesson 24.

Fourth Month - Have pupils tell you in their own language what they read. Preserve the best sentences spoken by pupils; print or write them on the board for subsequent reading lessons. Review and complete First Reader to Lesson 34.

Fifth Month - Compare the number of sounds with the number of letters composing the simplest words. Have parts of lessons copied on ruled slates. First Reader, Part I completed and Part II to Lesson 4.

Sixth Month. See that the pupils have the thought before they try to express it from the written page. Observe pronunciation. Frequently test the child's ability to pronounce words at sight and to spell by both letter and sounds. FIrst Reader Part II to Lesson 12.

Seventh Month. First Reader Part II to Lesson 23.

Eighth Month. Complete First Reader. Review with supplementary Readings.

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- SPELLING

First/Second Months - Words found in reading lessons.

Third/Fourth Months -- Words of the reading lesson and such other words the teacher may suggest. Introduce the script form of words.

Fifth Month - The first six lessons in the Indiana Spelling Book. Words from reading lessons.

Sixth Month - Speller to Lesson 15. Drill on short list of familiar words having the same vowel sound.

Seventh Month -- Speller to Lesson 18. Words from reader.

Eighth Month. Speller to Lesson 21. Words from reader. Review.

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- NUMBERS

Work in this grade not limited by months. All possible combinations in addition, subtraction, multiplication and division from 1-10, based upon the use of objects presented to the senses. Practical problems involving the processes of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

Proceed from concrete to the abstract.

Note: Pupils should be taught to represent numbers to 10 by words, figures and letters. Teach pupils to spell words representing numbers. Give special attention to neatness and uniformity in number work.

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- PENMANSHIP

Children should be provided with slates and long pencils from the start. The slates should be ruled on one side as the pages are ruled in the Indiana copy-book number two - the base lines being ruled heavier than the others. Let the teacher write upon the blackboard (using lines) the letters, or words that he wishes the pupils to copy. Pupils should in all cases use long pencils. Until the children have learned to make letters well they should not write from the printed text, but always from the script copy. Pupils should not be permitted to write carelessly; and all written work should be examined and corrected by the teacher. Care should be taken in making the leters "i"; "n"; and "o"; for these letters contain the elementary principles of writing. See that pupils hold pencils properly (see cut on cover of all Indiana copy books).

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- LANGUAGE

Work in this grad not limited by months. The language of this year must necessarily consist of oral work. Pupils should develop free and accurate expressions as rapidly as possible. Pupils should be required to answer questions in complete statements; and to describe them in their own language. Correct mistakes made by pupils. Hold conversation lessons with pupils; series of lessons on stories; oral descriptions of objects and pictures. Select pictures and have pupils tell what they can see in them; look carefully to the correctness of their expressions; conversational lessons on toys and pets. Oral reproductions of descriptions given by the teacher; correction of errors in expressions, etc. Have pupils distinguish between simple telling and asking sentences. Note: All language work of the first and second years should be done in connection with the reading lessons.

FIRST GRADE - FIRST YEAR -- GEOGRAPHY

First Year. Exercises to give primary ideas of color, size, form, position, direction, distance, time and motion. Also of day and night, seasons, people, modes of living, ways of traveling, means of communication and occupations.

==========

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- READING

First Month - Second Reader to Lesson 9. Pronounce all new words at the head of each lesson at the time of assigning the lesson and have the pupils repeat them. Give special attention to pronunciation, articulation and posture. Have pupils spell words dictated from the lesson. Continue slate work.

Second Month - Review and complete Second reader to lesson 20. Assign a few words to be used in short sentences. Observe previous suggestions. Give some supplementary reading.

Third Month - Second Reader to Lesson 31. Have pupils complete sentences by filling blank spaces with the appropriate words. Require short selections memorized by pupils.

Fourth Month - Second Reader to Lesson 43. Give phonic drills.

Fifth Month - Second Reader to Lesson 67 and review the previous month's work. Test the pupil's ability to read by giving exercises not previously studied.

Sixth Month - Second Reader completed. Continue the review using supplementary reading. Ask pupils to recite from memory some stanza or tell some story from this reader.

Seventh Month - Review of entire book.

Eighth Month - Supplementary Reading

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- Spelling

First Month - Speller to Lesson 25. Continue use of words from reading lessons. Practice both oral and written spelling.

Second Month - Speller to Lesson 33. Teach a vivid perception of the words by means of written exercises.

Third Month - Speller to Lesson 38, and review. Words from reading lesson.

Fourth Month - Speller to Lesson 46. Give attention to accent and diacritical marks.

Fifth Month - Speller to Lesson 53. Require pupils to arrange a list of words alphabetically with reference to the first two or three lessons.

Sixth Month - Speller to Lesson 64. Review the work previously outlined and give special attention to words of the reading lesson.

Seventh Month - Speller to Lesson 73.

Eighth Month - Speller to Lesson 82. Review

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- Number Work

Work in this grade not limited by months. All combinations in addition and subtraction of numbers from 1 to 21. Multiplication table through 5. Practical problems. County by 2,3,4,5 to 20 and back to 0, beginning with different numbers. The work in this grade is based, for the most part, upon the use of objects presented to the imagination. Work suggested in note after first grade to be continued.

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- PENMANSHIP

Require pupils to keep lines even in all work on the slate or paper, securing even margins and proper indentations for paragraphs, as seen in the Readers. Strive for the greatest possible neatness in penmanship. Begin use of pen and ink. Movement, position, accuracy of form, and rapidity should be carefully looked after.

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- LANGUAGE

Work in this grad not limited by months. During the second and third years the work should be chiefly upon the investigation of things. Generally language is supplementary and incidental to the work on other subjects. Since the pupils (sic) is in the stage of presentative work he is not fitted to study study language by applying rules. Language with him is to be a growth based upon the law of imitation and habit. Work for the first month of this year should consist of conversational exercises concerning the things taught in the various subjects studied by the pupil. Teach telling and asking sentences with their proper punctuation. Oral descriptions of objects and pictures. From words placed promiscuously on the board, form sentences - telling and asking. Give attention to capitals and punctuation. Teach commanding sentences. Teach pupils to distinguish name words. Teach use of is, are; was, were; has, have; I, me; to, too, two, etc. by filling blanks, changing one to the other, making telling and asking sentences, etc. Review the different kinds of sentences. Teach action words. Oral reproduction of short stories. Elementary work in description.

SECOND GRADE - SECOND YEAR -- GEOGRAPHY

The elements of geography. The natural divisions of land and water. Review first year's work. Teach surface, productions, and occupations in their inter-dependence. Teach the earth as a ball, also local geography.

==========

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- READING

First Month - Third Reader begun and completed to lesson 18. Two exercises daily. Show the purpose of punctuation and see that pupils do not confound marks with pauses. Give supplementary reading through the year.

Second Month - Third Reader to lesson 35, and review. Train pupils to gather thought from the printed page. See suggestions for previous work.

Third Month - Third Reader to lesson 52. Review, giving special attention to vocal training, oral and written expression. Teach long and short sounds of vowels.

Fourth Month - Finish Part I of Third Reader to lesson 10. Part II. Drill pupils on giving thought of lesson in language of their own - sometimes oral and sometimes written.

Fifth Month - Third Reader continued to lesson 27. Teach written expression by having pupils write short stories about pictures found in Reader. Have stories read by pupils.

Sixth Month - Third Reader to lesson 40, review of the same. Observe carefully all suggestions of the author. Continue memory exercises and supplementary reading.

Seventh Month - Third Reader to lesson 54.

Eighth Month - Complete Third Reader. Review with supplementary reading.

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- SPELLING

First Month - Speller to lesson 80. Keep list of mispronounced and misspelled words and use them for drills. Words from reading lessons.

Second Month - Speller to lesson 89. Teach the meaning of word 1 by calling for volunteer definitions from pupils; 2 give a clear definition yourself; 3 require the word to be used in a sentence by pupils.

Third Month - Speller to lesson 100. Teach both oral and written spelling; the former secures correct pronunciation, the latter is the more practical.

Fourth Month - Speller to lesson 112. Observe carefully synonyms and dictation exercise.

Fifth Month - Speller to lesson 124. Pay attention to irregular sounds, letters and special drill in pronunciation (lesson 124).

Sixth Month - Speller to lesson 139. Review.

Seventh Month - Speller completed to Part II. Review.

Eighth Month - General review of year's work.

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- NUMBER WORK -- ARITHMETIC

Arithmetic -- (Work in this grade not limited by months) -- At the end of the third year pupils are expected. 1 - to read and write numbers to 9999; 2 - to add and subtract from 1 to 9 to and from numbers ending in any digit; 3- to work examples in addition an subtraction involving three orders and carrying and borrowing; 4- to know the multiplication and division tables through 12; 5 - to work examples in multiplication and division involving four orders, multipliers and divisors not to exceed 10; 6 - to be well drilled in rapid combinations involving processes learned; 7 - to be able to reason out and work concrete written and mental problems involving all the combinations and processes learned in this and preceding years; Roman numberals as found in the reading lessons.

Steps 2 and 4 must be known absolutely, and the two processes of each step are to be taught together; give daily drills in steps 6 and 7; give work each day with special reference to developing the reasoning powers.

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- PENMANSHIP

Copy-book No. 2; secure good movement, rapidity and accuracy of form. Watch each pupil. See that none make letters "backward" or in any other reversed order. Read the rules printed in the copy books carefully. Have the pupils read them and follow them carefully. Have a time for writing and see that all write. Do not have writing in copy-books except as called for in your program. See that Penmanship is a daily-exercise.

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- LANGUAGE

First Month - Give drill exercises in the correct use of this and that; these and those; saw (seen); did (done); went (gone). Lead pupils to see that has, have and had are used with seen and not with saw.

Second Month - Drill in forming sentences from miscellaneously arranged words. Teach the formation of plurals.

Third Month - Develop two uses of comma, to set off words of address; to separate the words of a series. Two uses of the period, to close a sentence, to show abbreviations. Quotation marks.

FourthMonth - Continue to write statements and questions about familiar objects. Teach the correct use of sit, sits, sat, set, sets, have set, has set, etc.

Fifth Month - Oral and written reproductions of short stories. Written description of pictures and places from memory, observing correct use of words, capitals and punctuation.

Sixth Month - Continue work of last month, observing neatness, and correct form in all the work. Require subjects at the top of slate or paper, half-way across the page, and underscored; indentation of first line of each paragraph; hyphen to show the division of a word at the end of a line; the proper terminal mark at the close of each sentence; the pupil's name just below and at the right of the production.

Seventh and Eight Months - Elementary work in description and narration.

THIRD GRADE - THIRD YEAR -- GEORGRAPHY

First Month - Review previous work; give idea of map study, and draw school room, yard, township and county.

Second Month - Study of Indiana.

Third Month - Study of the United States.

Fourth Month - Special study of the Atlantic States.

Fifth Month - Study Spain, England, France, Italy and Holland, with reference to their institutional life.

Sixth Month - Chief commercial routes and products of the fifteenth century

Seventh and Eighth Months - Continue previous work, giving conceptions of the several geographical elements. Imaginary journeys.

==============

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- READING

First Month - Fourth Reader begun and completed to lesson 11. One recitation daily. Practice all exercises on emphasis and inflection. See suggestions on third grade. Special attention should now be given to the interpretation of the thought of the selections. Teach use of dictionary..

Second Month - Fourth Reader to lesson 23, and review. Teach definition of words and have pupils use them in sentences of their own. Observe abbreviated forms of words. .

Third Month - Fourth Reader to lesson 33. Have pupils write short compositions on familiar subjects to be read before the class. Pay attention to the punctuation, language, etc.

Fourth Month - Fourth Reader to lesson 42, and review the three preceding months.

Fifth Month - Fourth Reader completed to Part II.

Sixth Month - Review of first half of Part I, Fourth Reader.

Seventh Month - Review of second half of Part I, Fourth Reader.

Eighth Month - Supplementary readings. .

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- SPELLING

First Month - Speller Part II to lesson 166. Study homophonous words and their definitions. Singular and plural nouns.

Second Month - Speller to lesson 175. Review previous month. Titles, abbrevaiations and synonyms. Words from reading lessons.

Third Month - Speller to lesson 190. Review previous month's outline. Increase the amount of written spelling.

Fourth Month - Speller completed to Part III. Etymology. Review. Observe commercial terms and abbreviations.

Fifth Month - Speller to lesson 215. Exercises on primitive and derivative words from reading lessons.

Sixth Month - Review all of Part II, observing all suggestions..

Seventh Month - Lists of words from all branches..

Eighth Month - Continue and review.

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- PENMANSHIP

Same as third year, adding copy-book No. 3

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- LANGUAGE

(Elementary Lessons in English Begun)

First Month - the aim of all language work should be to lead the pupil to see for himself - to cultivate his power of observation at every step. From the first his attention should be directed to the use of language as the expression of thought. Never ask a pupil to express a thought in writing until he sees clearly what he is trying to express. The aim in this and next year's work is to lead the pupil to use, habitually, the right expression. The reasons why certain forms are right and others wrong are for the most part deferred until the complete grammar is used. This year's work is limited to the first half of Elmentary Lessons in English." Name and How to Write Them; The Statement - What it is, and about writing it.

Second Month - The word I; about Margins and Marks; Is and Are; Was and Were; Has and Have. The parts of a statement. Review and summary.

Third Month - More to learn about names. A Review Lesson.

Fourth Month - More to learn about Statements. A, An, The.

Fifth Month - More to learn about Names - forming plurals, possessives, etc. Questions for Review.

Sixth Month - The Inquiry; More to learn about Names; How to write a name that means but one and denotes possession. How to write possessive plural. Words used instead of names to denote possession.

Seventh Month - Reproduce written descriptions; punctuation.

Eighth Month - Work in description and narration.

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- GEOGRAPHY

(Elementary text-book to Africa this year).

Notes - Study the author's plan and instructions carefully, and follow them as nearly as possible until the work has once been thoroughly done. If the work indicated is completed before the expiration of any month, use the remaining time in supplementary work on the given subjects, or reviewing work of previous months.

In supplementary work the method preferred by the teacher may be used.

Special supplementary work should be done on Europe and the United States, using wall maps, or maps of the advanced textbook when necessary.

First Month - Introductory Lessons to XI.

Second Month - Introductory Lessons finished.

Third Month - The World. North America to Canada.

Fourth Month - North America finished. South America.

Fifth Month - Europe to Spain.

Sixth Month - Europe finished.

Seventh Month - Review North America and South America.

Eighth Month - Review Europe and Asia. Supplementary.

FOURTH GRADE - FOURTH YEAR -- ORAL HISTORY

(Work in this grade not limited by months).

Study of individuals by means of stories told to and repeated by pupils. Stories of King Philip, Lief the fortunate, Columbus, and other prominent characters in our history.

Note: Oral History work should generally be given in connection with Georgraphy lessons.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- READING

First Month - Part II of Fourth Reader to Lesson II. Compare silent and oral reading. Give special attention to the orthography and meaning of words. Define by using words in sentences as illustrations.

Second Month - Fourth Reader continued to Lesson 22. Study modulation, including pitch, force and rate.

Third Month - Fourth Reader to Lesson 32. Study synonyms.

Fourth Month - Fourth Reader to Lesson 43. Select lists of words from Parts I and II, and have pupils spell and define them.

Fifth Month - Fourth Reader completed. Use supplementary reading. Have pupils memorize choice selections and recite them before the class.

Sixth Month - Review of first half of Part II, FOurth Reader. Observe all previous suggestions.

Seventh Month - Review second half of Part II, Fourth Reader.

Eighth Month - Biographical sketches. Supplementary reading.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- SPELLING

First Month - Speller to Lesson 227. Careful study of suffixes. Words selected from other lessons.

Second Month - Speller to Lesson 236. Careful study of prefixes.

Third Month - Speller to Lesson 244, and review the two previous month's outline. Familiar words of foreign origin.

Fourth Month - Speller to Lesson 250. Review exercises in word building.

Fifth Month - Speller to Lesson 257. Exercises in suffixes, prefixes, contraction and compound words.

Sixth Month - General review of Part III. Etymology.

Seventh Month - Lists of words from all branches.

Eighth Month - Continue and review.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- ARITHMETIC - Pages 99-188

First Month - Common fractions. Reduction and addition.

Second Month - Substraction, multiplication and division of franctions. Pages 115-135.

Third Month - Decimal fractions. Pages 135-145. Review.

Fourth Month - US money. Demoniate numbers to time measure. Pages 145-163.

Fifth Month - Time measure. Addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of compound numbers. Pages 162-173.

Sixth Month - Percentage. Interest. Pages 173-188.

Seventh Month - Original problems.

Eighth Month - Review of year's work.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- PENMANSHIP

Same as fouth year with copy-book No. 3.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- LANGUAGE

Elementary lessons in English complete in this year.

First Month - Words that express qualities. What words express qualities: The use of the comma between quality-word; when to add est and when to prefix most; About spelling quality words.

Second Month - The command: Words that express action; Questions for review.

Third Month - Words that show How, When or Where, Emotions: words and the explanation

Fourth Month - More to learn about words; Review and Test Exercises.

Fifth Month - Letter writing; Parts of a letter; The Heading... The Address.

Sixth Month - The Body of the Letter, The Subscription; The Superscription; Abbreviations; Words to spell and use correctly.

Seventh Month - Description and narration; seek important attributes.

Eighth Month - More complete descriptions and narrations.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- GEOGRAPHY

Elementary Text-book -- Completed This Year

First Month - Africa

Second Month - Oceanica. The Sea.

Third Month - General Study of the United States, New England States.

Fourth Month - Middle Atlantic States, Southern States, Central States to Industries.

Fifth Month - Central States finished. Rocky Mountain and Pacific States and Territories.

Sixth Month - Review of the World, giving special attention to the United States.

Seventh Month - Show the effects of surface relief and climate upon institutional life.

Eighth Month - Same as preceding month.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- ORAL HISTORY

Study of races and nations, dealth with in U.S. History, in their homes. The Indian. The Norseman.

Notice of each race during the year, 1. Homes. 2.. Furniture. 3. Clothing. 4. Food. 5. Occupation. 6. Weapons. 7. Education. 8. Religious ideas. 9. Ideas of government. 10. Strongest beliefs and sentiments.

The Spaniard; The Frenchman; The Puritan; The Quaker; The Dutchman; The Colonists of the Revolution. a. The Whig. b. The Tory.

FOURTH GRADE - FIFTH YEAR -- Physiology, Oral Work

Work not limited by months.

The following is a suggestive outline for this year's work:

The body - Head, Trunk, Upper Extremities, Lower Extremities, the Bones.

In teaching this subject only common names should be used. Make the work as simple as possible. It should all be oral teaching until the second term is reached, when a book should be used. In this oral work special attention should be given to food, exercise in the open air, cleanliness, and other personal habits of children.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Reading

First Month - Fifth Reader begun and completed to lesson 14. See that pupils comprehend the meaning of what they read. Insist on pupils occasionally raising their eyes from the printed page. One lesson daily.

Second Month - Fifth Reader to lesson 28. Exercises on the circumflex and phonic drill on subvocal and aspirates. Supplementary reading.

Third Month - Fifth Reader to lesson 43. Review. Special attention given to grammatical and rhetorical pauses.

Fourth Month - Fifth Reader to lesson 58, and observe previous suggestions.

Fifth Month - Fifth Reader complete to Part II. Cultivate a taste for good literature. Memorize a selection from Longfellow; Scott Webster, Goldsmith and Irving.

Sixth Month - Review of first half of Part I of Fifth Reader. Memorize choice selections of noted authors. Observe previous directions.

Seventh Month - Review of remainder of Part I.

Eighth Month - Biographical sketches. Supplementary reading.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Spelling

First Month - Speller to lesson 267. Review exercises in grouping of words having the same pronunciation but different spelling and meaning.

Second Month - Speller completed. General review of abbreviations. Words selected from other lessons.

Third Month - Review of Part II - Orthography. Give special attention to the application of imporatnt rules for spelling, i.e., dropping the final e, changing y to i, the duplication of consonants, etc. Note exceptions to rules.

Fourth Month - Review of Part III - Etymology, carefully, observing the primitive and derivative words, suffixes and prefixes, and contractions.

Fifth Month - General review on definitions and diacritical marks of vowels and consonants.

Sixth Month - Review the work and drill in the discrimination of synonyms, etc.

Seventh Month -Correct use of words in sentences.

Eighth Month - Spell and use words from different texts.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Arithmetic

Complete text-book, Pages 7-187

First Month - Notation, numeration, addition and subtraction. Pages 7-39.

Second Month - Multiplication, division and review. Pages 39-71.

Third Month - Properties of numbers, cancellation, common fractions, reduction and addition. Pages 71-99.

Fourth Month - Subtraction, multipliation and division of fractions. Relations of number. Pages 99-123.

Fifth Month - Decimals. U.S. Money. Bills and Accounts. Review. Pages 123-145.

Sixth Month - Denominate Numbers to Longitude and Timne. Pages 145-173.

Seventh Month - Finish Denominate Numbers. Review book to division of fractions.

Eighth Month - Finish review of book to Percentage.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Penmanship

Same as fifth year, adding copy-book No. 4

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Language

(Intermediate Text-book)

First Month - The sentence. Classes of words.

Second Month - The parts of speech. The parts of a sentence.

Third Month - Punctuation in simple sentences. Uses of the parts of speech. Kinds of verbs.

Fourth Month - Kinds of adverbs, composition, forms of nouns, forms of pronouns, forms of adjectives.

Fifth Month - Forms of adverbs and forms of verbs.

Sixth Month - Prepositions, conjunctions, analysis and parsing. Common faults of speech, clauses, sentences and selections for study.

Seventh Month - FInish text.

Eighth Month - Elementary work in description and narration.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Geography

Note 1 - In outlining the subject of Geography the committee thought it best to arrange for the continuous study of each of the grand divisions through the three phases of the subject - Mathematical. Physical. Political. To this end the work has been related and the pages indiated.

Note 2 -- In the study of any subvision the same order of presentation should be observed as indicated in the study of the contents.

First Month - Mathematical Georgraphy. Earth - form, size, positions and motions, as determining general distribution of heat and winds. Zones - their width and position (pp. 2-8). Mankind - distribution (pp. 61-3).

Second Month - Forms of land and water and the atmosphere (pp. 8-14). Sea - waves, tides and currents, winds and rainfall. General distrubution of plants and animals as determined by climate, soil, etc. (pp. 33-47 and 53 and 54).

Third Month - North America: Mathematical - position, form and size. Physical - structure, relief and drainage (pp. 15-19). Plant life (pp. 47 and 48). Animal life (pp. 54 and 55). Races. Political (pp. 64-66).

Fourth Month - United States : New England States, Middle Atlantic States, and Southern States (pp. 66-80).

Fifth Month - United States: Central States, Pacific States, and Territories, and study of the Sixth Month. Canada, Danish America, Mexico, Central America and West Indies (pp. 94-100).

Sixth Month - Canada, Danish America, Mexico, Central America and West Indies (pp. 94-100).

Seventh Month - Indiana (Supplement).

Eighth Month - Review of year's work.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Oral History

(Work in this year not limited by months)

Inventions - CottonGin, Steamboat, Railroad Reaper, Telegraph, Submarine Telegraph, Telephone, Revolving Printing Press, Sewing Machine and Iron Plow.
Authors - Irving, Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Alice and Phoebe Cary, Bryant, Longfellow, Whittier, Holmes and Bancroft.
Higher Institutions of Learning. Accessions of Territory and Principal Treaties.
Current events.
Begin use of text.

FIFTH GRADE - SIXTH YEAR -- Physiology

(Primary book begun).

First Part of First Month -- The work outlined for this year is adapted to Primary Lessons in Human Physiology, and as the textbook is supposed to be in the hands of the teacher and pupils, the outline is brief.

First Month - How motions in the body are produced; Skeleton of the Upper Extremities; Skeleton.

Second Month - The study of the Human Boy; Tissues; Organs, and Systems; Anatomy Circulatory Organs.

Third Month - The Phsiology (sic) of the Circulatory Organs - The Blood; the Chemistry of the Body; Foods.

Fourth Month - Anatomy of the Digestive System; Digestion, Respiration.

Fifth Month - The Skin and the Kidneys; The Nervous System.

Sixth Month - Sensation; Sight and Hearing; Health; Poisons and their Antidotes.

Seventh Month - Review of book to Anatomy of Digestive System.

Eighth Month - Finish review of subject.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Reading

First Month - Fifth Reader to lesson 13, Part II. Study of authors, biographical sketches, literary excellence of selections. One lesson daily.

Second Month - FIfth Reader to lesson 25, Part II. Supplementary reading from Longfellow and Whittier.

Third Month - FIfth Reader to lesson 38, Part II. Give special attention to quality of voice, pure tone orotund, aspirated and guttural.

Fourth Month - FIfth Reader to lesson 47, Part II. Give special attention to vocal cultural, exercises in articulation, and orthography.

Fifth Month - Fifth Reader completed. Revfiew supplementary reading from Holmes, Irving, Dickens and Emerson.

Sixth Month - General review of first half of Fifth Reader, Party II. Observe all directions given.

Seventh Month - Finish the review of Part II, Fifth Reader.

Eighth Month - Supplementary reading form American authors.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Spelling

First Month - Teach word analyses by grouping words having the same prefixes. Spell all difficult words found in other lessons.

Second Month - Word analyses by grouping words having the same suffixes. Speall list of words selected from other studies.

Third Month - Word analyses by grouping words having the same roof. Spell list of words rom other lessons.

Fifth Month - Spell lists of trees, rivers, countries, towns, islands, birds, etc.

Sixth Month - Correct use of words in sentences.

Seventh Month - Spell and use words from different texts.

Eighth Month - General review of year's works.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Arithmetic

First Month - Percentage, Profit and Loss.

Second Month - Commission and Brokerage, Insurance, Taxes.Pages 201-215.

Third Month - Interest, Compound and Simple. Pages 215-227.

Fourth Month - Partial payments. Discount, Present Worth.

Fifth Month - Exchange, Equation of Payments, Averaging Accounts.

Sixth Month - Aliquots; Review Franctions.

Seventh Month - Review Denominate Numbers.

Eighth Month - Finish review of text to Ration and Proportion.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Penmanship.

Same as fifth year, adding copy-books Nos. 5 and 6. Be sure that the work is thoroughly done. Question carefully on the rules for making the letters. Penmanship and neatness should be continued in the preparation of all manuscripts.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Grammar.

First Month - Meaning and object of grammar; the composition of words; words and the sentence. Etymology of the noun. Etymology of the pronoun, verb, adjective, adverb and preposition. Pages 7-34.

Second Month - The conjunction and interjections, parsing; exercises for review. The derivation of words, their history, origin and formation. Properties of the parts of speech. Properties and modifications. Nouns, gender and number. Pages 34-54.

Third Month - Pronouns, gender and number. Person and case of nouns and pronouns. The adjective, properties, and modifications, the verbs, number and person; tense and mode; definitions. Pages 54-77.

Fourth Month - Conjugation; derivation and classes of verbs. Voice of the verb; conjugation of "to be" and "to be loved." The adverb, properties and modifications. Pages 77-97.

Fifth Month - The preposition, properties; the conjunction, properties; the interjection. General view of the sentence. Special view of the sentence. The subject, the predicate. Pages 97-117.

Sixth Month - Modifiers. Noun modifiers; noun substitutes; adjective modifiers and substitutes. Pages 117-133.

Seventh Month - Review of year's work.

Eighth Month - Composition, description, narration.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Geography

First Month - South America.
Mathematical - position, form, size.
Physical - Structure, relief and drainage (Pp. 20-23).
Plant life (Pp. 48-49).
Animal life (p. 50)
Races.
Political (pp. 100-105).

Second Month - Europe:
Mathematical - Position, form, size.
Physical (pp. 23 - 26).
Plant Life (p. 50) -
Animal Life (p. 57)
Political (pp. 105-110).


Third Month - Europe: The Continental States (pp. 110-115).

Asia:
Mathematical : Position, form, size
Physical Structure, relief and drainage (pp. 26-29).

Fourth Month: Asia (continued)
Plant Life (pp. 50-58)
Animal Life (p. 58)
Races.
Politial (pp. 116-121).

Fifth Month: Africa
Mathematical: Position, form size.
Physical: Structure, relief and drainage (Pp. 29-31).
Plant Life (pp. 51-52)
Animal Life (p. 58)
Races.
Political (pp.122-125)
Australia and Oceanica: Studied as indicated for Afrida (pp. 32, 52, 59, 126-128).

Sixth Month: Review
Mathematial: Motions of the earth, changes of seasons, general distribution of winds.
Physical: Ocean currents, winds and rainfall, and their effects on climate, and distribution of plants and animals.

Seventh Month: Political. Distribution of races; governments; and religions. Show that commerce depends upon the physical features of the country.

Eighth Month: General view of subjecty, including six year's work.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- History

(Text-book to National Development this year).

Note: When work is given to a certain heading, it is intended that the work be taken to that point within thte current month, and commenced of that point the following month. See text-book for proper "headings"; also for "Topical Analysis for Slate and Blackboard."

First Month - First Period - "The Discovery and Naming of America," Second Period - "Attempt at Exploring and Colonizing ameria," to ENglish Exploration.

Second Month - Second Period finished. Third Period - "Permanent English and French Settlements;" to New Netherlands or New York.

Third Month - Third Period, to Connecticut.

Fourth Month - Third Period, to the French and Indiana Wars.

Fifth Month - Third Period finished. Fourth Period - The Revolution; the Constitution, to "Washington Take COmmand of the Army."

Sixth Month - Fourth Period finished and Articles of Confederation.

Seventh Month - Review of subject to French and Indian War.

Eighth Month - Finish review of subject to National Period.

FIFTH GRADE - SEVENTH YEAR -- Physiology

First Month - The text for this year is the advanced lessons in human physiology, of the Indiana series of text-books. The study of the human body; general structure of the body; the skeleton; structure of bone; articulation.

Second Month - The muscular system; structure and properties of the blood; anatomy of the circulatory; physiology of the circulatory system.

Third Month - Foods and their relation to the activity of the body; anatomy of the digestive system; physiology of the digestive system; the respiratory apparatus.

Fourth Month - Changes in the air in respiration; ventilation; the vocal apparatus; excretion; animal heat.

Fifth Month - Anatomy of the nervous system; physiology of the nervous system; sensations of touch, taste and smell.

Sixth Month - The eye and the sensation of sight, the ear and the sensation of hearing; health and disease; poisons; antidotes, etc.

Seventh Month - Review circulation and digestion. Dissecting work.

Eighth Month - Review remainder of subject. Dissecting work.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- Reading

First Month - Study of American Literature. Henry W. Longfellow. Biography. Read Evangeline, or The Courtship of Miles Standish, or Paul Revere's Ride or The Builders.

Second Month -- William Cullen Bryant. Biography. Read Thanatopsis, The Death of the Flowers, Planting of the Apple Tree, and The Floord of Years.

Third Month - John G. WHittier. Bography. Read Snowbound, Maud Muller, Mabel Martin, The Barefoot Boy, Barbara Frietchie, and the Centennial Hymn.

Four Month - Oliver Wendell Holmes. Biography. Read the CHambered Nautilus, Old Ironsides and Union and Liberty.

Fifth Month - Washington Irving. Biography. Read the Sketch Book, or THe Life of Washington, or KnickerBocker's History of New York.

Sixth Month - Read biographies and of and selections from Bayard Taylor, Alice Carey, W.H. Prescott, James Fenimore Cooper, Edward Everett and George William Curtis.

Seventh Month - James Russell Lowell, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Daniel Webster.

Eighth Month - Continue work on Amerian authors.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- Spelling

First Month - General review of Orthoepy. (Part I)

Second Month - General review of Orthography. (Part II).

Third Month - General review of Etymology. (Part III).

Fourth Month - Study of words derived from the names of persons. Spell.

Fifth Month - Study of words derived from the names of places. Spell.

Sixth Month - Study of words taken from different texts. Spell.

Seventh Month - Continue work of sixth month.

Eighth Month - General review of the year's work.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- Arithmetic

(Pages 263-338, and review).

First Month - Ratio and Proportion. Partnership. Pages 263-277.

Second Month - Arithmetical Analysis. Involution and Evolution. Pages 277-189.

Third Month - Applications of Evolution. Arithmetial and Geometrical Progression. Pages 289-301.

Fourth Month - Mensuration. Review.

Fifth Month - Metric System. Test Problems.

Sixth Month - Review from Fractions to Percentage.

Seventh Month - Review from Percentage to Ration and Proportion.

Eighth Month - Continue review of book to Test Problems.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- Grammar

First Month - Review. The subject. The predicate, noun modifiers, noun substitutes. Adjective modifiers and substitutes. Adverb modifiers and substitutes. Pages 117-136.

Second Month - Modifiers distinguished forms of sentences; order of arrangement. Abbreviated speech; analysis of sentences; compound sentence; complex sentence; compound complex sentence. Pages 136-161.

Third Month - Sythesis: construction of the nominative; errors; modifiers; construction of adjective modifiers; construction of adverbial modifiers. Pages 161-185.

Fourth Month - Construction of connectives. Review modifiers and analysis of sentences.

Fifth Month - Punctuation. The comma; semi-colon; colon; period; parenthesis; brackets; apostrophe; hyphen; caret; quotation marks; Pages 190-204.

Sixth Month - Prose composition; composition of the sentence; variety of expression. Begin description.

Seventh Month - Elementary work in description and narration.

Eighth Month - Elementary work in exposition and argumentation.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- History

First Month - General study of Declaration and Constitution.

Second Month - Fifth Period - "The Union: National Development," to Monroe's Administration.

Third Month - Fifth Period to Harrison and Tyler's Administration.

Fourth Month - Fifth Period finished.

Fifth Month - Sixth Period - "The Civil War."

Sixth Month - Seventh Period - "Reconstruction: The New Nation."

Seventh Month - Review from beginning of The Revolution to War of 1812.

Eighth Month - Review remainder of year's work.

FIFTH GRADE - EIGHTH YEAR -- Physiology

The eighth year work on physiology consists of a complete review of the advanced lessons in human physiology of the Indiana State Series of text-books. The eighth year's work should be independent, i.e., not confined to one text-book, for the successful teacher should, in addition to the regular text-book, use a variety of books, and thus make the pupil's knowledge independent and exhaustive.

We would suggest that the subject be treated in a topical manner, so as to bring out all points thoroughly in their correct relation without learning the direct words of any author.

First Month - A full and complete analysis of the skeleton and muscles.

Second Month - Analysis of the circulation of the blood, with a study of the diseases, congestion, inflammation, etc. Also the effect of alcoholic drinks and narcotics upon the circulation, heart, membrane, blood and lungs.

Third Month - Analysis of digestion and food.

Fourth Month - Analysis of the skin, respiration and voice.

Fifth Month - Analysis of nervous system and special senses.

Sixth Month - Health and disease; poisons, antidotes, etc. Review of the book to circulation

Seventh Month - Review circulation and digestion.

Eighth Month - Review the remainder of the subject.

............................HIGH SCHOOL.......................

It gives me pleasure to speak of the work done in the High School during the past year. The enrollment was greater than ever before, the interest seemed better and we believe better work was done. This increased interest in the High School work was undoubtedly aided materially by the better facilities offered the pupils. The library, the reading room, the physical apparatus the dictionaries and books of reference are all efficient aids in securing a High School education. The Scool Board has certainly manifested a most commendable spirit in providing such excellent opportunities for the higher-education of the young people of our town.

It has been the aim to have the High Scool commissioned. This we think should be done. With this end in view, President W.W. Parsons of the Indiana State Normal school, also a member of the State Board of Education, was called in the early part of the year to visit the school. His report sent through the Clerk of the State Board of Education is as follows: "I have visited the High School at Waveland and carefully inspected the work done therein and beg to submit the following: The school meets fully in every way the requirements of the board for a commission but it has no class at this time, completing the revised course of instruction. I would reommend that the Superintendent be informed that as soon as a class shall enter on the last year of the present course a commission will be issued to the school." Signed by W.W. Parson. By the last year of the present course is meant a course which shall be at least 27 months in length. Now since this is the only barrier in the way cannot it be removed in the near future and thus place your High School along with the other comissioned High Schools of the state. While there is no post graduate course provided for there was one pupil, John Johnson, who did very acceptable work in Physics and Mathematics.

Statement of HIGH SCHOOL COURSE OF STUDY

The high school is the link between the common school and the college; and this high school we aim to be no exception. Although it is not commissioned, a number of its graduates have made creitable enterings at the best colleges in the State. After a review of the common branches, the High School work proper is taken up in the latter part of the first term. Particular attention is given to Mathematics and Latin. These run through the entire three years.

Civil Government was added to the course two years ago, and last year Physical Georgraphy was put in, which we think strengthens the course.

Better work in Physics is being done from year to year, from the fact that new apparatus is being added, which is so necessary for the work.

The composition, rhetoric, literature and history are designed to a decided degree thus to strengthen each other, and it is desirable that pupils shall be led to find that there is a close relationship existing among all.

With three years of Mathematics, three of Language, three of English, two of History and one of Science, we feel that the pupil ought at least to get that training and discipline of heart and hand which would enable him to take and hold an honorable position in the estimation of his fellowmen, and finally to realize his purpose in life.

.....ADMISSION.....

Students completing the Grammar department are rgularly promoted into the High School. Students hnolding county diplomas are admitted without examination. Students may enter the High School on passing a satisfactory examination in the eight common branches.

Children who are not residents may be admitted to the public school on payment in advance of the following tuition fees per month. Primary department, $1; INtermediate department, $1.25; Grammar department $1.50; High School department, $1.50. Resident students of Brown Township are admitted to the Grammar and High School departments without tuition.

........... DIPLOMAS ....

Pupils completing the course as prescribed and writing a suitable thesis and presenting the same as the Board and Superintent may direct, shall receive a diploma property signed by the same.

.................HIGH SCHOOL - CURRICULUM.....p 29.................

FRESHMAN
First Term

Arithmetic

Algebra

Grammar Latin

History

Civil Governmant

Literary Work
YEAR Second Term Algebra Latin Physical Geography

Civil Government

Rhetoric

Literary Work
JUNIOR First Term Algebra Latin

Composition

and Rhetoric

General History Essays & Debating
YEAR Second Term Algebra Latin-Caesar Advanced Composition General History Essays & Debating
SENIOR First Term Geometry Latin-Caesar American Literature

General History

Physics

Essays
YEAR Second Term Geometry Latin-Virgil English Literature Physics Theme

Note: Did not make a mistake - there is NO Sophomore year in that time frame :)

LITERARY SOCIETIES

The liteary work was no exception to the general progress of the school. The two popular literary societies of the High School, the "Star Lycum," and the "Irving CLub" did more and better work than ever before. The pupils manifested a spirit of energy and interest in all the literary work and there were fewer failures to respond and fewer fines were imposed than at any previous time. The "Whittiers" and "Longfellows" which were organized last year in the Second Intermediate Department, continued, their work this year under the same organizations. Those societies secured pictures of Whittier and Longfellow and had them suitably framed and hung in the chapel. The societies of the High School also had placed in the chapel a fine large picture of Washington, suitably framed. These pictures of noted and noble men have an educative value which is lasting and most beneficial.

It gives me pleasure to state that the literary societies of the school purchased a new organ for use in the chapel. They feel proud and justly too to think that they purchased this elegant piece of furniture and paid for it out of their own funds.

..........Public Exercises

Three public entertainments were given in the lst year. The first, Dec 20th, was a play entitled The Deacon, given at the Opera House. This was well patronized and favorably received. The receipts were about $30. The same cast of characters also gave the same play at New Market, Ind during the holiday vacation. It had about the same result and reception there as at home. As usual an entertainment was given Feb 22; but this year it was of a different character. It was given at the Opera House and the receipt amounted to nearly $30. The program was unique and was well received by the audience. The gross receipts for the three entertainments was near $85.

Program of Entertainment, Feb 22, 1896

I. Invocation

II. "America" ........................ By all ye people

III. Oration .... Ye Hero ......... By Joseph Ball

IV. Synging ............................. Star SPangled Banner

V. Piece .................................. Caroline Rusk

VI. Scene ................................."George and Martha"

VII. Duet .... by Wm. Blakely Kritz and Augusta Hartung

VIII. ....................................... "Ye Lyttel Hatchet Story"

IX........................................... "Ye Olden Times" - Scene

X Singing ................................ By 4 of ye people

XI. "Columbus" .................. By ye lads and lasses

XII. Musick ........................... "Blow, Bugle, Blow"

XIII. ....... .... Uncle Sam and John Bull in 1776 and 1783"

XIV ..... "Ye Sleeping Sentinel"...... Mame Straughn

XV. "Tenting Tonight" .................. By ye Menne Syngers

XVI. Ye Flagge Drill ........................ By 12 of ye Lasses

XVII..............................................Declaration & Scene

XVIII... Speech............................Charles Barr

XIX..... Synging ............................ "Sunrise"

XX................... Goddess of Liberty & ye 13 Original States

........... LIBRARY

The library continued to grow during the past year. Quite a number of new and valuable volumes were added, consisting of reference book (sic) and books for general reading. All the Pupil's Reading Circle books for the year 1895-96 were purchased. The books were also read more this year than in previous years. It was a requirement in two of the classes that each pupil should read a certain number of books in a given time. But besides the reading thus done the library was made good use of. Owing to the purchase of the organ and of the pictures for the chapel not as much money was expended for books this year as in previous years.

The Reading Room -- While the reading room was an experiment last year it was thought to be a successful one and was continued this year with greater success than last. About the same periodicals came to the reading room table this year as last. The general exercises, in the High School room, on Tuesday morning of each week consisted of a general discussion of the current events of the previous week. The information for the most part was secured from the papers and periodicals on the reading room table.

PROGRAM, COMMENCEMENT WEEK

Sunday evening, March 22, Baccalaureate sermon by Rev. W.G. Vessels

Thursday, 2:30 p.m. March 26, Business Meeting of Alumni Association.

Thursday evening, March 26, Alumni Social and Banquet at Hotel Stebbins.

Friday evening, March 27, Commencent Exercises

COMMENCEMENT

The Fifth Annual Commencement exercises were held in the Christian Church on Friday evening, March 27. Orchestra music was furnished by the Montani Bro's of Indianapolis.

................CLASS OF '96

Augusta Hartung .................... Nelle Kritz ....................... Layla Kritz

Maude McIntosh................................................................ Charles Shanks

PROGRAM of OMMENCEMENT

March ............................................................. "King Cotton"

Invocation

Medley Overture .......................................... "Around the Metropolis"

Sunshine and Shadows ....................................... Augusta Hartung

Waltz ................................................................... "Only one Girl"

Eugene Field ....................................................... Layla Kritz

Music .............................................................. "The Sweetest Story Ever Told"

A Reverie ........................................................ Maud McIntosh

Gavotte .............................................................. "Wild Rose"

"The New Woman"............................................ Nelle Kritz

Spanish Waltz .............................................. "Espanita"

Real Forces ..................................................... Chas. Shanks

Music ............................................................... "Ben Bolt"

Presentations of Diplomas ............................... Supt. Walter Dunn

March ............................................................. "The Honeymoon"

Benediction

..................Rules Adopted by School Board

Superintendent - Powers and Duties

1. The Superintendent shall act under the direction of the Board.

2. To him shall be committed the general supervision of the Public Schools.

3. He shall superintend the classification and grading of pupils, and visit the different departments as often as may be consistent with his other duties, and observe the methods of teaching, suggest improvement or give instruction.

4. He shall devote himself to the duties of his office, and perform such other duties, not herein specified, as the Board may require.

Duties of Teachers --

1. Teachers shall be in their respective rooms at least 30 minutes before ringing of second bell in the morning, and 20 minutes before ringing of second bell in the afternoon.

2. Whenever the pupils are going in or out of the building, at the opening and closing of school, and at recess, the teachers are to give personal attention to the conduct of their own pupils.

3. Teachers shall not permit disorder, unnecesarry noise, running or rude conduct in their rooms or halls at any time.

4. No teacher shall expel or suspend a pupil without the consent of the Superintendent.

5. All teachers shall make monthly reports as directed by the Superintendent.

6. It shall be the duty of each teacher to attend all such regular or occasional teachers meetings as the superintendent shall appoint, and to perform such duty as may be assigned. It is expected that they shall pursue such line of professional reading and study as shall fit them for efficient work in their profession.

7. For wilful violation of rules, or for unfitness or inability, the Board reserved the right to dismiss a teacher at any time.

Duties of Pupils

1. Pupils are expected to be regular and punctual in their attendance, and whenever they shall have been absent or tardy they shall bring written excuses from their parents or guardians on their next appearance in school.

2. No pupil shall be excused from school, after entering for the day, except at the discretion of the teacher, without presenting to the teacher a written excuse from parent or guardian.

3. Teachers may require any work, lost through absence or inattention, to be made up by the pupil, as a condition of remaining in the class.

4. Any pupil who shall be absent from any class work or from an examination of the class to which he belongs, without the consent of the teacher, and who shall fall to render a sufficient excuse for his absence, shall not be allowed to return to the school without the consent of the superintendent.

5. Pupils shall walk quietly through the halls, and up and down stairs; they shall not converse in the halls or on the stairways. They shall not loiter about the school premises after the close of school.

6. The use of tobacco in any form is forbidden on the school premises, or any similar substance in the school building is forbidden.

7. Any pupil who shall be guilty of unchaste or profance language, or of such immoral or vicious conducts and habits as are injurious to associates or the schools, or who shall habitually violage any of the rules prescribed by the Board for the observance of the pupils, shall be liable to suspension.

8. In any case of emergency, for which, there is no rule provided, the superintendent shall have full power to act as he deems proper, pending the action of the Board.

Duties of the Janitor

1. The Janitor shall sweep and dust the school rooms and halls as often as may be necessary to keep them clean. He shall wash and keep in good order, at all times, the windows and woodwork of the building, and shall be ready, at all times, to carry out the directions of the superintendent and the Board.

2. He shall have special care over the school property in the absence of the superintendent and teachers, and shall keep the school building, out-houses and grounds in good condition.

3. He shall supply the rooms with the proper amount of heat, and shall aid the teachers in securing the proper ventilation.

4. He shall be present at the building at such times as the Superintendent may indicate, and be ready to carry out his instructions. He shall perform such other duties as the Board may direct.

HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI ..................

Call of '84

Herbert S. Kritz ......................................... Merchant, Waveland, Ind

Class of '85

Henry M. Robertson ........... Student State Normal, Terre Haute, Ind

Will C. Butcher ............................................ Mechant, Waveland, Ind

Ellerslie W. Leech * ............................................. Crawfordsville, Ind

Class of '91

Lulu M. (Milligan) Taylor ........................................Waveland, Ind

Ida M. McIntosh ....................................................... Waveland, Ind

Arthur F. Canine * .................................................... Waveland, Ind

Williard Canine * ..................................................... Waveland, Ind

Sarah B. Freed............. Student, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind

M. Anna Taylor ........................................................... Waveland, Ind

Class of '93

Ernest W. Simpson .................................................... Russellville, Ind

Charles S. Foster ......................................................... Waveland, Ind

Robert M. Foster ................................... Teacher, Crawfordsville, Ind

Perley D. McCormick ..................................................... Lebanon, Ind

Class of '94

Maude Allen ........................................................... Indianapolis, Ind

Etta Chenault .............................................. Teacher, Waveland, Ind

Sara V. Hanna .............................................. Teacher, Waveland, Ind

Jessie Smith ................................................................. Waveland, Ind

Class of '95

John A. Johnson..... Post Graduate Student, Waveland High School

Jasper L. Rice ......................................................Clerk, Waveland, Ind

Nellie E. Burks ..................................................... Clerk, Waveland, Ind

Barnett W. Harris ............................................... Clerk, Waveland, Ind

Class of '96

Augusta Hartung ........................................................ Waveland, Ind

Layla Kritz ................................................................... Waveland, Ind

Nellie Kritz .................................................................... Waveland, Ind

Maud McIntosh............................................................. Waveland, Ind

Charles Shanks .............................................................. Waveland, Ind

.......................Alumni Association...........

After Commencement last year it was found that there were two other classes which were entitled to membership in the Alumni Association; so the classes of '84 and '85 were accordingly given a place. The Alumni have effected a permanent organization and will endeavor to grow in strength and usefulness as its roll increases from year to year. While only seven classes have graduated and each one was small there are 27 names upon the Alumni roll. Of this number three have already finished this life's work and two from the class of '91. Let us hope that as the years pass by this body of alumni will grow in power, strength and usefulness, as well as increase in numbers, and that it will stand as a guard, willing to defend, protect, and support is alma mater, of which is is so justly proud. At the business meeting this year, the following officers were elected:

Herbert S. Kritz, '84 .................................... President

Maud Allen, '94 ...................................... Vice President

Layla Kritz, '96 .......................................... Secretary

Ida McIntosh, '91 ..................................... Treasuerer

The second annual social and banquet was held at Hotel Stebbins on Thursday evening, March 26.

...................CATALOGUE OF STUDENTS............

Showing the enrollment and record of attendance for the year of 1895-6, with the classification for 1896-7. Those who were present until the close of the year and passed the final examination successfully, and whose work was satisfactory were promoted. Those who left before the close of the year will be required to make up the back work before going on with their classes. Those whose names are followed by ? are promoted on trail.

...................HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT ......................

......................................... Senior Class ..................................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Acker, Laila 12 1/2 Pickard, Lottie 131
Alspaugh, Joe ? 116 1/2 Robertson, Fred 132
Foster, Martin ? 137 1/2 Rusk, Cecil 116
Foster, Lela 132 1/2 Shuey, Nellie 135
Hendrickson, Gertie 134 1/2 Straughan, Lee 118 1/2
McCormick, Vera 126 1/2 Willoughby, Effie 133
Moore, Alex 136 Wolfe, Bessie 110

....................................... Junior Class ........................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Alspaugh, Frank ? 78 Demaree, Grace 135
Burks, Addie 75 Leonard, George 132 1/2
Conway, Mike 140 Moore, Sylvia 17
Deere, Grace 132 1/2 Smith, Mary 56

..........................................Freshman Class ........................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Barr, Charlie ? 111 1/2 Irwin, Kate 124
Clore, Clarence ? 125 1/2 Miller, Delia 122
Collins, Mack ? 127 Milligan, Dean 112 1/2
Crutchfield, Harry 125 Phipps, Kate 65
Deere, Gertrude 51 Rusk, Carrie 135
Demaree, May 137 Rusk, Charle 227
Foster, Anna 112 Robertson, Mollie 135
Fullenwider, Maye 92 Shuey, Frank 137
Giltner, Clyde ? 127 Straughan, Mayme 137
Ghormley, Carl ? 139    

....................................... Eighth Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Allen, Lora 9 Miles, Lulie ? 109 1/2
Ball, Corda 119 1/2 Milligan, Sam 76 1/2
Barton, Sadie 20 Moore, Marcus 96 1/2
Chamness, Henry 14 Straughan, Maud 135 3/4
Fraley, Ethel 58 1/2 Spruhan, Katie 133
Ghormley, Lola 137 1/2 Sharp, Ray 137 1/2
Hanna, Olive 117 3/4 Wilson, Stella 140
Jarvis, Nina 117 1/2 Wolfe, Pauline 109 1/2
Lamson, Clifford 117    

...................SECOND INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT ......................

.......................................Seventh Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Brown, Luther 86 1/2 Moore, Elsie 118
Butcher, Joe 134 1/2 Payton, Cecil 132 1/2
Canine, Harry 34 3/4 Proctor, Paul ? 138 1/2
Campbell,Ernest 3 Ritter, Irene 105
Fraley, Elsie 51 Rivers, Katie 38
Galey, Minnie 55 1/2 Sharp, Ira 138
Hayden, Vessie 8 Stebbins, Tommie 133
Jarvis, Hazel 135 Spruhan, Fred 130
Johnson, Tom 134 Vessels, Lillian 45
Johnson, Ted 139 Wolfe, Blanche 135 1/2
Kelley, Pearley ? 132 3/4 Ware, Charley 117

.......................................Sixth Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Brown, Alonzo ? 127 Fraley, Lutie 60 1/2
Brown, Curtis 128 Hutson, Effie 136
Britton, Ina* 50 Jarvis, Edith ? 140
Canine, Sallie 125 Johnson, Edith 132
Dietrich, Hazel 139 Robertson, Mae 125
Demaree, Frank 140 Shaul, Harry 135
Demaree, Emily 125 Smith, Ethel 138
English, Gracie ? 120 Swisher, Howard 136
Foster, Pearl ? 137 Wasson, Nellie 139

...................THIRD INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT ......................

.......................................Fifth Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Acker, Mort 100 Manning, Zola ? 137
Barton, Harvey 2 McNutt, Frank 136
Butcher, Nellie 108 Moore, Earl 138 1/2
Clore, Georgia 124 Milligan, Milford ? 129
Conway, James 139 1/2 Mosley, Nellie 120
Gourtney (Gourley?), Loris 139 Neighbors, Frank 130
Campbell, Grace 6 Rice, Bertie ? 138
Cunningham, Jessie 98 Rivers, Johnie 15
Galey, Harry 127 Shaul, Olive 135
Hanna, Alberta ? 120 Shuey, Mabel 138
Hennessy, Katie 132 Wilson, India 140
Jones, Frank 11 1/2 Yount, Clar 137
Lee, Jennie 134 Zangmuster, Lula ? 121

.......................................Fourth Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Allen, Bertie 10 Miles, Roy 98 1/2
Britton, Willie 112 Miles, Ethel 120
Barton, Willie 20 Miles, Albert 100
Barr, Harry 140 Miles, Laura 108
Bilbo, Donald ? 130 1/2 Mosely, Alford 140
Bishop, Hattie 84 Moore, Robert 90
Conway, Mary 112 Moore, Robert S. 85
Conner, Rosa 131 Moore, Merl 115
Clore, Withrow ? 110 Miller, Rena 123 1/2
Demaree, Carl 137 McKinsey, Minnie 123 1/2
English, John 87 Rice, Nettie 129
Hanna, Raymond 140 Robertson, Frank 127
Humphreys, Jessie ? 134 1/2 Shephard, Cecil 127
Hennessy, Gertie ? 97 Smith, Alberta 139 1/2
Jarvis, Cecil 133 Scott, Ethel 98
Lewis, Clay 140 Scott, Ida 30
Lewis, Herbert 137 1/2 Thomas, Murray 135
McClain, Gertha 132 1/2 McClain, Bertha 125

.......................................Third Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Allen, Lee 10 Jones, Kline 47 1/2
Alward, Jesse 7 Kleiser, Mildred 113
Alward, Wrista 11 Lough, Herbert 125
Brown, Etta 59 Lamson, Nellie 120
Bilbo, Ferol 127 McNutt, Tom 139
Barton, Harry 15 Miles, Nelson 107
Conway, Dan 118 Moore, John 118 1/2
English, Fred 81 McKinsey, Nealie 115
Fullenwider, Glenn 135 1/2 Scott, Stella 132
Fullenwider, Newton 131 Scott, Ethel 22
Ghormley, Walter 140 Spruhan, Madge 124
Harshbarger, Beatrice 121 1/2 Wilhite, Forest 139
Ghormley, Laila 237 2/3 Whalen, Pearl 75
Jones, Minnie 53    

.......................................Second Year ............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Alspaugh, Jessie 115 Manning, Joe 137
Alward, Henry 48 1/2 Marshall, Jesse 50
Barton, Ina 20 McCowen, Clydie 108
Birch, Emma 6 McCowen, Lottie 102 1/2
Birch, Clarence 13 1/2 McKinsey, Ollie 114 1/2
Birch, Leonard 14 1/2 Miles, Morris 115
Canine, Ben 127 3/4 Miller, Maude 109 1/2
Courtney, Lyle 124 1/2 Moody, Harry 12 3/4
Fullenwider, Ethel 112 1/2 Moore, Leona 104 1/2
Hennpssy, Jimmie 137 Mosely, Hattie 139 1/2
Jarvis, Madge 136 Robertson, Anna 113 1/2
Jarvis, Forest 124 Robertson, Bessie 113 1/2
Loudermill, Hubert 143 Roberts, Jessie 128 3/4
Lough, Mabel 126 Wilson, Hallie 140

...................FIRST PRIMARY DEPARTMENT ......................

.......................................Section I............................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Birch, Walter 9 Scott, Bennie 134 1/2
Brown, Orpha 111 Scott, Charlie 110 1/2
Jones, Blanche 40 Thomas, Minnie 38
Milligan, Clarence 109 Yount, Harry 112
Scott, Helen 94 1/2    

.......................................Section 2...........................

NAMES Days NAMES Days
Clore, Harry 91 Miles, Martha 62
Harshbarger, Warren 44 1/2 Moore, Lee 38
Lee, Wilson 61 Pickard, Harry 90
Marshall, Guy 35 Pickard, Henry 89
McKinsey, Charlie 113 Smalley, Edith 91 1/2
Miles, Otie 68    

........................................HONOR ROLL..................................................

PUPILS NEITHER ABSENT NOR TARDY DURING ENTIRE YEAR:

Mike Conway Harry Barr Raymond Hanna
Stella Wilson Walter Ghormley Hallie Wilson

PUPILS NEITHER ABSENT NOR TARDY DURING ONE TERM OF YEAR:

Alex Moore Ted Johnson Charlie Barr
Harry Crutchfield Frank Demaree Grace Deere
Clifford Lamson India Wilson Ira Sharp
Hazel Jarvis Joe Butcher Cecil Jarvis
Katie Spruhan Paul Proctor Clay Lewis
Fred Spruhan Carl Demaree Alford Mosley
Tom McNutt Alberta Smith Madge Spruhan
Stella Scott Morris Miles Bennie Scott

.......................................TEXT-BOOKS USED..................................................

READERS:

......Indiana Series

LANGUAGE & LITERATURE

......Speller, Indiana Series

......English & American Literature, Swinton's Masterpieces

.......Rhetoric, Waddy's

.......Latin, Collar and Daniell

........Caesar, Harper & Tolman

........Virgil, Allen & Greenough

....... Latin Grammar, Allen & Greenough

MATHEMATICS

..........Geometry, Wentworth

.......Algebra, Milne's High School

.......Arithmetic, Indiana Series

HISTORY

.......General History, Myers

.......History of United States, Montgomery's

SCIENCE

.......Physics, Gage's Introduction

.......Civil Government, McCleary's

.......Physiology, Indiana complete

.......Georgraphy, Indiana Series

.......Physical Georgraphy, Eclectic

MISCELLANEOUS

.......Writing, Indiana Series

.......Dictionary, Webster's

-----------------END ----OF-----REPORT ---------

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The website management appreciates all the contributions provided for use here. When using something from this site PLEASE use the following citation as your source :) THANKS MUCHES - kbz

Citation: The Indiana GenWeb Project, Copyright 1997-2015 (and beyond), Montgomery County GenWeb site http://www.ingenweb.org/inmontgomery/

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The INGenWeb Project, Copyright ©1997-2015 (& Beyond), Montgomery County Website 
© Copyright 2015 ... and beyond .... Karen Zach

Data contained within this website may only be used with permission of the submitter, for non-commercial research and educational activities, and for personal genealogical information.

Data contained within this website may only be used with permission of the copyright holder(s), for non-commercial research and educational activities, and for personal genealogical information. © 2015 ... +by Karen Zach, and licensed to the Indiana GenWeb (INGenWeb) Project and the USGenWeb Project. May be used in personal research with a citation.

This page created:  

12 October 2012