BIOGRAPHY

Dr. Matthew Hugh Bounell

Dr. Matthew Hugh Bounell, one of nine children, was born on a farm in Butler County, Ohio, November 12, 1822 and was six years old when brought by his parents, Mathew and Ruth (Florer) Bounel, to Indiana. His early education was acquired in the old fashioned log school. Later he attended school at Frankfort for a limited period and for one year pursued his studies at Ashbury University, Greencastle, Indiana. After learning the cobbler's trade, he decided to adopt the medical profession for his life work; after some preliminary study he entered the Rush Medical college at Chicago, and in 1847 embarked upon his professional career at Lebanon, where he soon built up a large practice, which, owning to the poverty of the majority of the people, was not very remunerative. In 1851 he located at Yountsville, Montgomery county, where he practiced successfully for ten years, in the meantime doing work in the Rush Medical college, from which he was graduated the following year. While in Yountsville, it was reported that his home was a station in the underground railway. In 1861 he returned to Lebanon and resumed the practice and was thus engaged until 1863, at which time he raised Company G, 116th Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, being elected and commissioned Captain when the company was organized. Later he was made major surgeon of the regiment and for some time acted as post surgeon at Tazewell, Tennessee and was also, for a limited period, surgeon of the brigade. Dyer's Compendium of the War of the Rebellion reports the history of the regiment:

Organized at Lafayette, Ind. and mustered in for 6 months' service August 17, 1863. Moved to Dearborn, Mich. August 31, and guard arsenal till September 16. Moved to Nicholasville, Ky., September 16. Attached to Mahan's 1st Brigade, Willcox's Left Wing Forces, Dept. of the Ohio, to January 1864. District of the Clinch, Dept. of the Ohio, to February, 1864. Service - march from Nicholasville, Ky. to Cumberland Gap September 24-October 3, 1863 and to Morristown October 6-8. Action at Blue Springs October 10. March to Greenville and duty there till November 6; thence march to Bull's Gap and across Clinch Mountain to Clinch River November-December. Action at Walker's Ford, Clinch River, December 2. Duty at Tazwell, Maynardsville and in East Tennessee till February 1864. Action at Tazwell January 24. Mustered out February 29 to March 2, 1864. On return home he again resumed the practice of medicine in Lebanon, which was continued until 1872, when he moved to his farm not far from Lebanon. He again moved to Lebanon about March, 1895 and continued his practice.

On September 19,1844 Dr. Bounell married Mary Louisa Kilgore, daughter of David Kilgore, one of the pioneers of Clinton county. They had two children - Thomas Aaron, a physician practicing in New Brunswick, Indiana, and India J., a registered nurse. Dr. Bounell's wife Mary Louisa died in 1862. In 1863 Dr. Bounnel married Elizabeth Heath, daughter of Joshua Heath, a prominent merchant of Lafayette. They had two surviving children at the time of his death - Dr. Harry Matthew, a physician practicing in Waynetown, Indiana, and Emory Guy, a physician practicing in Indianapolis. A third child, William Heath, died November 2, 1866 at age 1 month 9 days.

Dr. Bounell died March 23, 1896 at Lebanon. He was a member of the Methodist Church, one of the oldest Masons in the state, was a member of Boone County Medical Fraternity. He was buried in Oak Hill Cemetery, Lebanon.

Source: Family history files; obituaries of the time; Boone/Clinton Co. History, A W Bowen, February, 1895, pp. 217-218; Dyer's Compendium...

This biography submitted by Harry L. Bounell, Rosebriar@earthlink.net

File Created: 2006-Jul-17

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