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(State) Senator Dr. Israel Thompson Canby

Source? Dr. Israel T. Canby, born in 1785 in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. As a young man (1814), he moved to an inherited estate in Piatts' Landing, near Lexington Kentucky and married Elizabeth PIATT [born ca. 1784], granddaughter of Major Robert Piatt, in Boone County, KY on 12 Jan 1817. Israel Canby served as a Representative in the Indiana General Assembly from 1821 to 1822. He attended Medical School at Transylvania University receiving his MD degree in 1825. According to the 1825 academic catalog, Israel Thompson Canby received his M.D. in 1825. The University archivist also found a listing for him in the library's archival index of Transylvania University students from the early 1800s through the 1970s: Canby, Israel Thompson Madison County, Indiana Medical Department 1824-25, M.D. Thesis, "Cholera Infantun." (1825) Source: BJ Gooch (Ms) Special Collections Librarian University Archivist Transylvania University Library Lexington, KY 40508-1797

Email: bjgooch@transy.edu

He lived in Madison County, Indiana in 1824. He returned to Jefferson County Indiana, and was elected as a Senator in the Indiana State Senate from 1826-1828. He resigned on July 4, 1828, to run for Governor. He is listed as a tax payer on land in Jefferson County, Indiana in 1829. Canby Israel T 160 SW 36 4 9 Canby Israel T 14 Canby Israel T 19 2/3 10 Canby Israel T 17 1/3 10 Canby Israel T 160 SW 6 3 12 Canby Israel T 160 SE 33 4 11 Canby Israel T 140 PF,1SE,36 1&36 3&4 11 & 11 Canby Israel T 90 SW Frac 35 4 11 Canby Israel T 120 Frac 35 4 11 Also listed is Joseph T Canby agent August 4, 1828 Tippecanoe County cast 212 votes for Thomas H. Blake and 54 for the winner, Ratliff Boon, for First District Congressman. The county supported James Brown Ray, the winning governor candidate, with 105 votes to 87 for Harbin H. Moore and 70 for Israel T. Canby. Robert Taylor won the state representative race from the district still designated as "Fountain, Montgomery and Adjacent Area." In the state's second referendum on calling a constitutional convention, Tippecanoe cast 47 votes for and 198 against. Statewide, the question lost 19,671 to 10,607. He lost the race for Governor in August 1828 and switched careers again in 1829, becoming the financial receiving agent for the Federal General Land Office, in Crawfordsville, appointed by US Congress under the request of Andrew Jackson, in 1930. He is found as administrator of several early estates in the area and delved in buying and selling properties galore (including the Canby Addition to Crawfordsville).

Source: A Letter from Israel T. Canby, Re: Indiana Politics - Jan 29 1830. Seymour Adelman Letters and Documents Collection, Bryn Mawr College Letter: Crawfordsville, Ind., to Samuel Judah, 1798-1869, Vincennes, Ind. 1 item (2 p. on double sheet) ; 25 x 41 cm folded to 25 x 21 cm ALS. To Judah, a lawyer, and past and future member of the Indiana House of Representatives, Canby writes of travel plans and current business. Of special note is his discussion of Indiana politics: "All things are amicably adjusted and the paper will be entitled the Indiana Democrat & State Gazette by Morrison & Kinnard. The fears . . . of the influence of Gov. Ray are altogether groundless . . . but it is important to have him with us. The nomination of the Supreme Judges, and the disposition of ten or twelve votes in the legislature, are in his hands, and we had much better have them with us than against us."

March 10, 1830 To the Senate of the United States. GENTLEMEN: In compliance with the resolution of the Senate of the 6th instant, requesting me to "send a copy of the bond entered into and executed by Israel T. Canfield as receiver of public moneys in the now Crawfordsville district, Indiana, together with the names of his securities, to the Senate," I herewith transmit a certified copy of the official bond of Israel T. Canby, and a letter from the Secretary of the Treasury, from which it appears that this is the officer referred to in the resolution.

ANDREW JACKSON. WASHINGTON.

It seems likely that Israel F. Canby, who was probably a son of Dr. Canby, was the one who married an Irish widow, Ann Carter, in Crawfordsville in January 1841. This Ann's Obituary is published in Indianapolis, December 7, 1850 (as yet unseen). This Israel was a Captain in the Union Army, enrolling from Lexington Kentucky. An article (by William Tutweiler) in the March 1979 issue of Montgomery Magazine refers to a scandal regarding the misappropriation of funds, and is should be read if you're interested in this man. When the Land Office was closed, he had difficulties accounting for all the required funds, and many purchasers "on time" had not paid as promised, so those who were his "guarantors" were held liable for the debts to the Government. All of his assets were consumed by the debt, and twice the US Congress acted to relieve the remaing debts. Senate Bill #428, dated March 9, 1868, canceled debts pending against his sureities, as did a second US Senate Bill #221, enacted March 29, 1869, long after his death. He was also reported to be involved in collecting funds for a local railroad that never came to be, yet at his death, on April 14, 1846, all seemed reasonably well with his estate as his pluses totaled over $22,000 after debts were paid. He founded the Crawfordsville Female Academy in 1840.

Source: 'Crawfordsville: Athens of Indiana' by Karen Bazzani Zach, p 86

One of Montgomery County's most colorful early settlers is certainly Dr. Israel T. Canby, born in 1785 in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. As a young man (1814), he moved to an inherited estate in Kentucky and married Elizabeth Piatt there in 1816. They had at least seven children (according to the 1830 census), but only Sarah, Edward and R. S. are known. The latter became a General in the Civil War and was later massacred by the Modock Indians out west in the 1870's. Although one source says Elizabeth died in 1833, I found him with a wife in the 1840 census. At any rate, he married an Irish widow, Ann Carter, here in Crawfordsville in January 1841. It's not know just when Canby had time for his doctoring as he was heavy into politics, becoming a U.S. Senator from Jefferson County, Indiana just after receiving his medical degree from Transylvania Medical College. He lived in Madison County, Indiana for some time, as well. In 1827, he voted against a bill to improve domestic manufacturing. He lost the race for Governor in 1828 and switched careers again in 1829, becoming the U.S. Land Officer of Crawfordsville. He is found as administrator of several early estates in the area and delved in buying and selling properties galore (including the Canby Addition to Crawfordsville). An interesting article (by William Tutweiler) found in the March 1979 Montgomery Magazine in regards to a scandal of the inappropriation of funds is must reading if you're interested in this man. He was also involved in collecting funds for a local railroad that never came to be, yet at his death, on April 14, 1846, all seemed reasonably well with his estate as his plusses totaled over $22,000 after debts were paid. Oddly, information regarding Canby rarely mentions what I consider his greatest accomplishment, that of founding the Crawfordsville Female Academy in 1840.

 

# S. [Senate Bill] No. 221--

For the relief of the sureties of Israel T. Canby, late receiver of public moneys at Crawfordsville, Indiana.--[By Mr. Pratt.]

Discussed, 1036;

passed 1037;

passed House 2213;

enrolled 2272;

approved, 2303. In House:

Received from Senate, 1050;

referred, 1697;

reported, 2214;

passed, 2215;

enrolled, 2280.

Source: Journal of the Senate of the United States of America, 1789-1873 THURSDAY, April 1, 1869. Mr. Willey, from the Committee on Claims, to whom was referred the bill (S. 221) for the relief of the sureties of Israel T. Canby, late receiver of public moneys at Crawfordsville, Indiana, reported it without amendment, and submitted a report (No. 5) thereon, which was ordered to be printed. Journal of the House of Representatives of the United States, 1869-1870 SATURDAY, February 5, 1870. S. 221. An act for the relief of the sureties of Israel T. Canby, late receiver of public moneys at Crawfordsville, Indiana. Israel Thompson Canby One of Montgomery County's most colorful early settlers is certainly Dr. Israel T. Canby, born in 1785 in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. As a young man (1814), he moved to an inherited estate in Kentucky and married Elizabeth Piatt there in 1816. They had at least seven children (according to the 1830 census), but only Sarah, Edward and R. S. are known. The latter became a General in the Civil War and was later massacred by the Modock Indians out west in the 1870's.

Source: Information from: Karen Zach -- Although one source says Elizabeth died in 1833, I found him with a wife in the 1840 census. At any rate, he married an Irish widow, Ann Carter, here in Crawfordsville in January 1841. It's not know just when Canby had time for his doctoring as he was heavy into politics, becoming a U.S. Senator from Jefferson County, Indiana just after receiving his medical degree from Transylvania Medical College. He lived in Madison County, Indiana for some time, as well. In 1827, he voted against a bill to improve domestic manufacturing. He lost the race for Governor in 1828 and switched careers again in 1829, becoming the U.S. Land Officer of Crawfordsville. He is found as administrator of several early estates in the area and delved in buying and selling properties galore (including the Canby Addition to Crawfordsville).

----

Source: An interesting article (by William Tutweiler) found in the March 1979 Montgomery Magazine in regards to a scandal of the inappropriation of funds is must reading if you're interested in this man.

He was also involved in collecting funds for a local railroad that never came to be, yet at his death, on April 14, 1846, all seemed reasonably well with his estate as his plusses totaled over $22,000 after debts were paid.

Oddly, information regarding Canby rarely mentions what I consider his greatest accomplishment, that of founding the Crawfordsville Female Academy in 1840.

Additional details about Israel Canby's family can be found at: The Canby family.

 

File Created: 15 March 2010

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Data contained within this website may only be used with permission of the copyright holder(s), for non-commercial research and educational activities, and for personal genealogical information. © 2014 by Karen Zach, and licensed to the Indiana GenWeb (INGenWeb) Project and the USGenWeb Project. May be used in personal research with a citation.

This page created:  15-Mar-2010