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Joab ELLIOT -- see also bio below the query :)

From: Marsha Moses

Date: Tue, 13 Jul 2004
To: jeff@ibssg.org


Source: ELLIOTT-L@rootsweb.ancestry.com
Subject: Abraham Elliott

I found new information today that has blown me away. It is found on fiche #6105177 at my local LDS FHL. It is a copy of a book that is called History of Montgomery County(Indiana) together with Historic notes on the Wabash Valley....by H. W. Beckwith. Now I realize that these old history books can be less than accurate. But the man that Mr. Beckwith is presenting a biography is still alive when it is written, so I assume that he has interviewed Joab Elliott. I believe at this time that Joab is a brother to my Catherine Elliott McKinsey. So I can only say that I am beyond excited at the information that is presented in Joab's biography. I have suspected for a long time that my Catherine Elliott McKinsey's family migrated to Ohio from Randolph County, NC. But I did not expect that to be stated in the very first paragraph of this information. Here is the article:

Joab Elliot, retired, Crawfordsville, now a man of seventy-three years, has spent his life in Indiana. He has seen the state grow as he grew to manhood, and he has grown gray has beheld his state continue to develop. His father was a native of Randolph County, North Carolina, and in 1806 made a trip to Indiana territory and purchased 160 acres of land in the twelve-mile purchase. In the following year he moved his family in a four-horse wagon a distance of 700 miles, from Tennessee to his lately purchased farm. Stopping over night in a log-cabin just within the Indiana border, and within six miles of their destination, where all was wild and only wild animal or wilder savage broke the silence, a child was born November 18, 1807, and they called his name Joab. This was on Green´s Fork, one and a half miles northwest of the present city of Richmond. They soon settled on their frontier home and here in the then Far West they lived several years. Here Joab was raised with few other companions than nature furnishes where civilized foot has never yet trod. The Elliots lived within the bounds of the friendly indians; but just beyond, the whoop of hostile foes rent the air, and made the forest more weird. Forts or block-houses were built on the Elliot farm, in which the few whites of the region took refurge. In 1811 they experienced the earthquake of that time, and which Tecumseh thratened the Indians of the south when they refused to joinn hiim in the attemt to exterminate the whites. This was a peculiar occurrence and the Indians imatined it was the fulfillment of the chief´s threat. The War of 1812 brought the bloodthirsty savage closer to the threshhold of the pioneer. The Elliots, becoming tired of risking danger, moved to Warren County in 1813, wherethey remained three years. Then Mr Elliot went to Cincinnati, and with five other families took a flat-boat for Jefferson County. After wandering considerably he settled eight miles south of Terre Haute. The head of the family ceased the toils of earth May 30 1821 at the age of fifty six years. His wife had died November 26, 1819. The boy Joab was left parentless, yet hardhips were not new to him. While among the red men he became quite efficietn in theuse of the Indian language. Many a time he has been carried on the back of John Green, the chief of the friendly tribe, and he relates with freshenss and vigor thrilling incidents of his early days. His brother served in the War of 1812.

His people in early times were Quakers. His grandfather being called upon to fight by the tories in the Revolutionary times refused, on account of his religious scruples, where upon the tories tied him to a tree and gave him his choice to fight or die. He preferred death to a violation of his oath. The tories arranged themselves in line sixty steps distance, preparatory to shooting the steadfast man. All was ready when a son of the doomed man, and brother to Joab´s father, interfered with these words: "Men, if you must shoot anyone, shoot me, as father has a family to support.' Saying this, the brave son placed himself in front of his father to shelter him. Even the tory heart was moved, and both father and son were allowed ot live.

After the death of his parents, Joab lived with his brother inn Ohio, but in 1828, he made Montgomeryy County his permanent home and bought eighty acres, the W. 1/2 of N.E. 1/4 Sec 23, Ripley township. There he married, December 31 1829, Susan Mann, the daughter of an early settler. He built the old-time log hut and around the crackling fire did he and Susan muse and think of the roof left and that which they yet would build. The years hastened on and no family was born to them to fill the space around the board, but their hearts went out to the needy, and ieght children have found homes within their doors, but one of whom (Nettie Elliot, or Jennet Aprag) is now at home. Mr. Elliot was partly raised by her gr-grandfather. About 1857 Mr. and Mrs Elliot moved from their farm to Crawfordsville, and in 1874 made their residence where Mr. Elliot with their adopted daughter, Nettie, now live; Mrs. Elliot having died Arpil 17, 1876 at the age of sixty-three years, after a life well spent. At her table the present Hon M.D. White had boarded many years, and he was pleased to call her mother; also John White, now of Danville, Ilinois, became as one of the family under her roof. With her husband wshe was a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Elliot was an early whig in politics, but for many years he has ever been founc true to republicanism and in hhis old age loves his party. Joab Elliot is one of INdiana´s oldest living children.

Thanks for any help that you can give me. Marsha in WV


Source: History of Montgomery County (Indiana) together with Historic notes on the Wabash Valley....by H. W. Beckwith.

Joab Elliot, retired, Crawfordsville, now a man of seventy-three years, has spent his life in Indiana. He has seen the state grow as he grew to manhood, and he has grown gray has beheld his state continue to develop. His father was a native of Randolph County, North Carolina, and in 1806 made a trip to Indiana territory and purchased 160 acres of land in the twelve-mile purchase. In the following year he moved his family in a four-horse wagon a distance of 700 miles, from Tennessee to his lately purchased farm. Stopping over night in a log-cabin just within the Indiana border, and within six miles of their destination, where all was wild and only wild animal or wilder savage broke the silence, a child was born November 18, 1807, and they called his name Joab. This was on Greenīs Fork, one and a half miles northwest of the present city of Richmond. They soon settled on their frontier home and here in the then Far West they lived several years. Here Joab was raised with few other companions than nature furnishes where civilized foot has never yet trod. The Elliots lived within the bounds of the friendly indians; but just beyond, the whoop of hostile foes rent the air, and made the forest more weird. Forts or block-houses were built on the Elliot farm, in which the few whites of the region took refurge. In 1811 they experienced the earthquake of that time, and which Tecumseh thratened the Indians of the south when they refused to joinn hiim in the attemt to exterminate the whites. This was a peculiar occurrence and the Indians imatined it was the fulfillment of the chiefīs threat. The War of 1812 brought the bloodthirsty savage closer to the threshhold of the pioneer. The Elliots, becoming tired of risking danger, moved to Warren County in 1813, wherethey remained three years. Then Mr Elliot went to Cincinnati, and with five other families took a flat-boat for Jefferson County. After wandering considerably he settled eight miles south of Terre Haute. The head of the family ceased the toils of earth May 30 1821 at the age of fifty six years. His wife had died November 26, 1819. The boy Joab was left parentless, yet hardhips were not new to him. While among the red men he became quite efficietn in theuse of the Indian language. Many a time he has been carried on the back of John Green, the chief of the friendly tribe, and he relates with freshenss and vigor thrilling incidents of his early days. His brother served in the War of 1812. His people in early times were Quakers. His grandfather being called upon to fight by the tories in the Revolutionary times refused, on account of his religious scruples, where upon the tories tied him to a tree and gave him his choice to fight or die. He preferred death to a violation of his oath. The tories arranged themselves in line sixty steps distance, preparatory to shooting the steadfast man. All was ready when a son of the doomed man, and brother to Joabīs father, interfered with these words: "Men, if you must shoot anyone, shoot me, as father has a family to support.' Saying this, the brave son placed himself in front of his father to shelter him. Even the tory heart was moved, and both father and son were allowed ot live. After the death of his parents, Joab lived with his brother inn Ohio, but in 1828, he made Montgomeryy County his permanent home and bought eighty acres, the W. 1/2 of N.E. 1/4 Sec 23, Ripley township. There he married, December 31 1829, Susan Mann, the daughter of an early settler. He built the old-time log hut and around the crackling fire did he and Susan muse and think of the roof left and that which they yet would build. The years hastened on and no family was born to them to fill the space around the board, but their hearts went out to the needy, and ieght children have found homes within their doors, but one of whom (Nettie Elliot, or Jennet Aprag) is now at home. Mr. Elliot was partly raised by her gr-grandfather. About 1857 Mr. and Mrs Elliot moved from their farm to Crawfordsville, and in 1874 made their residence where Mr. Elliot with their adopted daughter, Nettie, now live; Mrs. Elliot having died Arpil 17, 1876 at the age of sixty-three years, after a life well spent. At her table the present Hon M.D. White had boarded many years, and he was pleased to call her mother; also John White, now of Danville, Ilinois, became as one of the family under her roof. With her husband wshe was a member of the Christian Church. Mr. Elliot was an early whig in politics, but for many years he has ever been founc true to republicanism and in hhis old age loves his party. Joab Elliot is one of INdianaīs oldest living children.


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