Welcome to
Montgomery County, Indiana



A Part of The INGenWeb Project

 

Home

About Me!


Alumni Records (Schools - fun page)

Bible Records

Biographies

Brick Wall

Cemeteries

Census

Court Records

Crawfordsville District Public Library's databases for genealogy - their site and this site work great hand-in-hand - ENJOY

Diaries & Journals

Family Fact Sheets

Family Recipes

History

  • Towns (lists of towns/township information - town photo albums are under Photos - Places and name of towns - all 400 + of 'em - thanks JT & SZB:)
Letters

Military

News

Obituaries

Photographs (includes people,
places & things - you will find
town albums here under "Places")


Resources

Reunions
School & Family (Jobs; War Units .....)

Who's Who

CLYDE MOORE _ letter home


Source: Waveland Independent Waveland, Montgomery County, IndianaMay 17, 1918

"Clyde Moore goes to Harvard. "Cambridge, Mass May 12, 1918 Dear Mamma: I promised to write you about my trip how I like it here. We left Great Lakes about 8:30 a. m. last Thursday and went to Chicago. We had a real send-off. Lots of the fellows came down and told us goodbye. I was sort of sorry to leave the old place. I had gotten used to the discipline (?) and all. **We got out of Chicago about 10:50 and started on our journey eastward. We went thru northern Indiana among the sand dunes. I wish you could see them. The sand blows to fare-you-well. I saw some houses built way out and the sand was all over them. They had no lawns or anything else. I wouldn't like it there at all. It wasn't long before we hit Michigan. We ate in the diner about 11:30. We went thru Niles, Battle Creek, Ypsilanti, Jackson and Detroit. At each of these places we stopped a little bit, sang and cheered. We were given a good welcome all thru Michigan. I saw the most vineyards - acres of grape arbors. I thought I would see lots of apple trees and potato fields but not many of them showed up. When we reached Jackson we ate again. It was thru that part of the country it looked better for farming and working. When we reached Detroit we were met by a delegation of the Red Cross and they gave us sandwiches and doughtnuts, chocolates, candy, pie, post cards and coffee. They treated us fine.

As we left Detroit an electric locomotive hooked on to us and we went into a tube and went under Detroit and the river. I was rather disappointed because I wanted to see Detroit. It wasn't long before we were in Canada and went to bed. At St. Thomas, Canada, we were awakened by a lot of switching. It was rather late but we peeped out and saw a lot of Canadians. We went back to bed and awakened in Buffalo about 2:30 but it was dark and we couldn't see much. We went back to sleep again and got up again in Syracuse, NY. Then we commenced tosee pretty land, rolling enough to make it pretty. In all the towns there are lots of steeples. In Rome there were thousands and when we got there the sun was just coming up and it looked dandy. The steeples seemed to be silent sentinels over a sleeping city. In Rome are some of our largest copper mints. After we breakfasted we went down the Mohawk Valley along the Mohawk River. I got to see the Erie Canal and at Utica we got into the foothills of the Adriondacks. I wish you could have been there, too. The Mohawk Valley is noted for its gardening. At Albany we were changed to another train. We crossed the placid Hudson and then skirted the river to Troy. Down the Hudson Valley is one of the most beautiful sights I ever expect to see. The valley is just full of houses. We went up on a hillside like, and could see for miles. Oh, but it was fine!

We lost two fellows in Albany, too. We left the Hudson beofre long and went up into the hills. Then came more beautiful scenery. The rolling hills, the towns nestled up on the sides, the tree-covered tops and the valleys made it grand. We travelled for hours and hours in the hills. Every place we went thru we were cheered. I saw a tower that was built by Washington as a lookout and saw a church at Deerfield, where the Indians massacred a lot of people during the Revolution. We went thru the Hoosac tunnel -it's about five miles long. We went thru Concord and at Greenfield we got our lunches. About 5:30 we arrived in Cambridge. We marched to the college and here we were mustered and given liberty until 7:45 Saturday. We mustered again and took a physical exam. Friday night I went to Boston and stayed at the YMCA. I took my first ride in a subway too. As Saturday noon we were given liberty until Monday morning. I looked around awhile Saturday and Sunday. Have walked nearly a hundred miles already. Have seen the old Elm - Washington's Elm, Lowell Home, the first church and house built here and saw the place where Leif Ericson built his house in 1000. He was a Norseman and the first man to see America (North). I am going to take a trip to all the historical places before I leave Bunker Hill, Revere Beach and then some of the old houses and such. This place just breathes historical romances. It is an old place but fine.

One thing is the way the streets are laid out. They are narrow and crooked and in the middle of the town is a graveyard daing years and years ago. Along the Charles River they have walks and drives. I have been away up the river since I came here. This is a wonderful place. The college here is just what I expected. We are quartered in the old gymnasium. We eat in Memorial Hall. I wish you could see the busts, the paintaings and the tables there< - all the noted men since time began - tablets with the names of the men that were int he Civil War etc. They have colored glass windows, pictures of noted men and then the things that the school stands for such as Love, Honor, Manhood, Truth, Faith and such. I am in love with this place now. We haven't had any school yet, just been playing around, although 40 of us launched 10, 28' foot cutters **** AC Moore, Cambridge, Mass, US Naval Radio School - transcribed by karenbazzanizach

 

===============

Source: Waveland Independent, Waveland, Montgomery County, Indiana Dec 321, 1917

Clyde Moore has enlisted in the Navy for radio service and is in training at Great Lakes near Chicago.

 

Source: Waveland Independent Waveland, Montgomery County, Indiana Aug 23, 1918

Dear Mother: Enroute to Belmar NJ on a boat left Narraganset Bay about an hour or so ago. Left Boston at 3 and got to Providence RI at 4. We took the boat at six and will arrive in NY about 7 in the morning. Leave there at 8:15 and get to Belmar about 10:30. Had a wonderful trip down the bay - saw some beautiful homes - real mansions. I saw Harry K. Thaw's mother's home and it was a peach too. On a hillside overlooking the bay with the most beautiful background I have ever seen. I hated to leave Cambridge in a way. Had to leave Morris and the other fellows with whom I was acquainted. It is that way in the navy; you make friends and then you are parted for a long time. I can't hold in any longer I am wearing a crow with two stripes. I am a second class radio electrician. I had the highest average throughout the course and made 1st honors. My average was 38 which isn't so bad. I got a Bullards electrical guide, two volumes and I couldn't have bought it for less than $15 to $18. Not so bad for a few hours work, do you think? I am in charge of the drafts to Belmar, too by the way. Good night, Ace.

Source: Waveland Independent Waveland, Montgomery County, Indiana April 5, 1918 Clyde Moore who is a radio man at the Great Lakes Naval station, Chicago came home Tuesday for a six-day furlough. He is looking fine. After his return he expects to be sent to Boston.

Source: Waveland Independent Waveland, Montgomery County, Indiana May 20, 1927 Clyde Moore - Butler Clyde Moore, who has been a student in Butler Univ. for the past three years has made the second highest average in that school for the three years. In addition to carrying the full course, he has retained his position with the American Telegraph & Telephone Co. The company is sending him to Chicago this summer for a special 8 weeks course of instruction in his regular work.


The website management appreciates all the contributions provided for use here. When using something from this site PLEASE use the following citation as your source :) THANKS MUCHES - kbz

Citation: The INGenWeb Project, Copyright 1997-2015 (and beyond), Montgomery County GenWeb site http://www.ingenweb.org/inmontgomery/


The INGenWeb Project, Copyright ©1997-2016 ... (& Beyond), Montgomery County Website 
© Copyright 2016 ... and beyond .... Karen Zach

Data contained within this website may only be used with permission of the submitter, for non-commercial research and educational activities, and for personal genealogical information.

Data contained within this website may only be used with permission of the copyright holder(s), for non-commercial research and educational activities, and for personal genealogical information. © 2016 ... ++++ by Karen Zach, and licensed to the Indiana GenWeb (INGenWeb) Project and The USGenWeb Project. May be used in personal research with a citation.

This page created:  

12 October 2012