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NOTE: I have put the graves I have found (original listing was 9 - now, have 83 (lots of thanks to my "poor" partner, Kim H -- on 12- 9- 2017 but this may be about it findable, not in real life as I've guestimated about 150 there) on findagrave that you can find here - trying to find more "poor" folks buried in the "poor" cemetery -- see also the listing at the bottom of the page - Kim has been amazing finding parents, etc., so you will probably want to check our cemetery on findagrave, as well

Source: Found in Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 11 June 1868 p 2
The best exercise of memory -- Remember the poor !!!!

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Current (2017) buildings -- added on to at least twice - second one is what I believe to be the original section (as per above - could be wrong)

COUNTY FARM SUPERINTENDENTS FOUND (many more - some approximate time periods)

James Wallace #1 - 1844-1848
James Hatch -- 1848 -1850
Henry Bowen -- 1850 -1852
Thomas Campbell -- 1852 -1855
W.R. Lawson -- 1856-1858
George Jones, Sr. -- 1859 - 1867
George Jones, Jr. -- 1868 - 1873

* Note there is a descrepency here -- Source: C'ville Star March 9, 1875 p 2- Lawson, the Supt of our County Asylum has resigned. His place will be filled by our Commissioners tomorrow. So, it likely should be ___ Lawson 1874-March 1875 and Thomas J. Hole, March 1875 - 1890
Thomas J. Hole -- 1874-1890
May/may not be one between them (Likely __ Himes or George Myers)
Lant Long -- 1892 - 1893
George Myers - 1894-1900
Samuel Himes - 1901 (brief time - could not do the job)
WIlliam Brown - 1901-
May/may not be someone between them
Bert Knight - 1915 -
Bert Dunbar - 1931 -
Seth Swank - 1935 - 1943
Ashley Cox 1943 - 1950
Pat & Edith Newlin - likely followed Swank and were there from ? in 1950-s to early 60s.


Unknown dates
Arlie Denman - early 1960s - ?
Jerry Lee Ward (probably about 1967 - possibly the last closing it up about 1984 ? (his obit says he was Administrator of the MC Home for 21 years

Article - 1892 - Albert Stump's mother finds him in Poor House after being separated 16 years


SEE BELOW for those buried here and/or died here

SERGENT -- (Feb 2018)--Chris Mowery -- writes that : My family is all from Eastern Kentucky, but according to the pension file of my ancestor Joseph Thomas Sergent, he got very sick during his Civil War service (24th Kentucky Mtd. Infantry) and the family somehow ended up living in an old log schoolhouse at the County Poor Farm in Crawfordsville, IN where he died August 26, 1865. Is there any information about this there, or about the cemetery where I assume he was buried?

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Source: Crawfordsville Review 1 April 1871 p 4

The following are the present inmates of the County Poor House as reported by Dr. W.L. Johnson: Idiots, 10; Insane 5; Maniac, 1; Lame 5; old age 2; Fever 1 ; Heart Disease 1; Boy, 1 – total 26 The boy is healthy, and should be sent out and apprenticed to work with some farmer or mechanic. Any one of good character can have him on application.

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Source: Crawfordsville Star Sept 14, 1875

Last Sabbath a representative of the Star made an informal visit to that home of the county’s wards, commonly known as the Poor Farm not only as a matter of curiosity but also that the reading public might know something as to the conditions of things around this institution to which hard necessity annually consigns so many helpless men, women and children. The Superintendent was found at home and as usually willing to oblige the seeker after facts; accordingly a complete tour was made of the entire premises from the cells of the insane to the fields of growing grain, and, as the visit was unannounced and unexpected, nothing was in holiday dress but everything wore its usual everyday look.

There are now 49 inmates of the house, and as winter draws near this number is being constantly augmented by new arrivals every week. Of this number, 3 men are incurably insane and kept in close confinement in comfortable brick cells detached from the main building; 22 are comparatively able bodied men, the 24th man is quite aged and confined to the sick bed from which he will probably never rise; 15 are women and 3 are bright-eyed little girls and the remaining 5 are small boys. These children are at an age suitable for adoption and should be immediately taken from the institution and placed in suitable families. As one would naturally suppose, it takes a large amount of provisions and clothing to provide for so large a family and the demand for the products of the farm is far in excess of the supply, although every foot of it is in superior cultivation.

For the item of bread alone 300 # of flour are consumed each week. The farm consists of 140 acres of good tillable land and 40 of timbered land. Of this, 28 acres were this year in excellent wheat, 50 is superior corn, several acres in sugar cane, and enough in potatoes to bring at least 500 bushels, to say nothing of the land used as garden and meadows. The most commendable feature of the present management is the perfect cleanliness that prevails throughout the institution. To many this feature may seem nothing remarkable, yet everyone who has made the rounds, seen all that is to be seen and reflected upon the past habits of life of the different unfortunates cast on the county’s charity, will acknowledge the great difficulties attendant on a strict system of cleanliness. Every week the entire building is scrubbed out from top to bottom and takes through a general course of suds.

The County Commissioners made their regular quarterly visit last week and report themselves well pleased with the general keeping of the institution. Mr. Hole, the present Superintendent has occupied the position six months, is a hard-working thorough business like farmer and it would be difficult indeed to find a more humane and suitable couple than Mr. H. and wife to whom such a task could be safely confided. There are one or two matters which the writer thinks are worthy of mention and should receive the immediate attention of the worthy Board of Commissioners. The first is the lack of living accommodations, there now being only 14 sleeping rooms in the pauper quarters to accommodate an average household of 50 person, which will convince all that some extensive additions should be made to the building. Another matter demanding attention is the lack of land; there not being sufficient area to produce needed supplies, it would look like good policy for the county to purchase more land while it may be got at low figures and farming in with pauper labor out of several large items of expense in the purchase of grain and meats. The health of the inmates is good, there having been but two deaths since Mr. H. took possession.

--- same page but in different area- The county asylum does not contain a single colored inmate. This is not a bad showing for the …

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MARY DAVIS

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 6 March 1873 p 1-- Mary DAVIS, an old lady and an inmate of the county asylum, fell last Friday and broke her right arm and received other injuries. It is thought she will not recover - kbz

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THOMAS SMITH

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 5 July 1895

Another Reissue of Pension Thomas A. Smith, who died in the Poor House last Thursday, had been a good soldier and rendered his country valiant service in Co. A, 19 Reg. Ind. Vol. Inf. He was pensioned at $12 a month under President Harrison's administration, and the Hoke Smith gang with their usual love for a Union soldier cut his pension down to $6 per month, and the veteran died in the County Poor House.

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, March 9, 1875 p 3

There has been considerable feeling manifested by the public in this vicinity for the past two weeks over the death of an insane man by the name of Josephus Beach at our County Asylum. He was being kept in this institution under a contract entered into between the Commissioners’ and Mr. Henry Nicholson of this city as guardian of said deceased at a stipulated price. When the remains were about being lowered into the grave, it appears the coffin was opened for a final view of the corpse, when it was discovered that the body was literally swarming with vermin. This sight did not give the relatives and friends the most kindly feelings toward those who had been entrusted with his keeping and the County Commissioners’ instituted an investigation and we are sorry to report that the evidence elicited on a full hearing of the case, was not of the most pleasing and gratifying character for Mr. Lawson who had charge of the house. We heard the evidence before the Board of Commissioners on Thursday last and do not think there is room for a shadow of doubt about the deceased being in a most desperately filthy condition; and the only point yet unsettled in the public mind is in regard to the kind of vermin with which the body was encased – whether of the head or body. Be this as it may common humanity demands better treatment of either afflicted paupers or the incurable insane entrusted to the keeping of the Superintendent of the County’s asylum. ‘Twould be a burning disgrace to the county to peaceably tolerate such downright neglect of oversight in any one having charge of that institution. Its keeper should be a man endowed with extraordinary Christian humanity, that these poor unfortunates in his care might not be neglected in any particular. On Friday last the Commissioners, accompanied by Drs. Bass, Taylor and Phillips; and JW Ramsay as acting coroner, visited the cemetery in Coal Creek township and had the body resurrected for further investigation and post mortem examination; the verdict of the jury impannelled as we understand was that Beach’s death was brought about by a softening of the brain, caused directly by fits, and not by lice. For the honor of the county we are glad to record this decision.

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Source: Crawfordsville (Montgomery County) Indiana Star newspaper, March 23, 1875 p 2

In the excitement consequent on the mysterious assassination of Mrs. Brown, the public has almost lost sight of the Poor Farm investigations. Doubtless the change of thought has been beneficial; since everything possible has been done to ameliorate the sad condition of the county’s wards by a change in management, & c. We now only refer to the matter that the public may know something of the true condition of the Farm. Last Monday morning we interviewed Mr. TJ Hole, the newly-elected manager, and learned some facts that do not show the best in the world for the former management. In answer to our inquiries if there were any “gray-back,” body-lice, or other vermin to be found about the premises, Mr. H, on protest stated that there were; that genuine graybacks had been found in the pauper quarters, but that he was now making every effort for their speedy extermination, knowing that on the approach of warm weather their numbers would be increased to legions. He was not a little surprised himself to learn of their actual presence in such numbers, yet he was in nowise discouraged with the prospect. Mr. H reports 62 inmates in the Asylum and an addition will be made this week of three more, which will make the number 65. This shows that our County Asylum is becoming very popular. There is one entire family in charge of the county, consisting of father, mother and child. There is a slight difference in their ages, about as follows: the youthful groom and father is just passing through his 74th winter; his wife has just witnessed her 24th birthday and their child is just four years of age. Another proof of the old saying that true loves waits not for riches. But to resume, the death of Beach has left only four maniacs who are necessarily kept in close confinement. Two of these refuse to wear any clothing at all, and are kept from perishing by a sort of furnace adjoining their cells; it being found unsafe to leave stoves in their apartments. Notwithstanding the severity of the present winter, Mr. Hole informs us these incurables have passed through it remarkably well. As to the amount of provisions required to sustain this immense family of 65 members, Mr. H. states they weekly consume the flour from 12 bushels of wheat for the item of bread alone. As to the other necessaries, grocers, & c the consumption is of course equally great. There are many other interesting facts that we might have gleaned from Mr. Hole and interested the reader. For, notwithstanding the loathsomeness of the Beach investigation, the people are anxious to know how the Poor Farm affairs are conducted – enough however has been learned to sustain the fears of many that its previous record has not been just what it ought. Mr. Hole is a very clever appearing gentleman and has the record of being a number one farmer and humane man. He has doubtless undertaken fully as big a job as he contemplated, but he seems in nowise discouraged and is driving ahead cleaning up the entire Asylum, and preparing to make the institution in the future more like a real home for the unfortunates who have been thrown on the charity of the county. – transcribed by kbz

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, March 16, 1875 p 2 Editor Star:

A statement from myself at this late day may seem supererogatory and yet I feel that the literature of the Beach investigation would be incomplete without my contribution. And here let me say, by way of preface, that the whole false impression that has been received by the community (and in fact by the whole news reading world) was molded into shape by the Crawfordsville Journal. Injury has been done to the reputation of a private citizen and his family, that will take years to undo; simply because Faleschool is lighter of foot than Truth. And while I am upon this part of my subject, let me notice briefly the action of our noble legislative, Weeping Peter, the bosom friend of the gallant Journal. Mr. Kennedy rises majestically in his seat and has put upon the State a law that in his brilliant imagination will cut the Gordian knot. A committee of investigation to be appointed by the Board of Commissioners to visit and inspect the County Asylum four times a year; for which they are to be remunerated at the rate of $1 the head per visit. All of this Mr. Kennedy does for $8 a day, and yet the “people” are not happy! True some of us may think a Committee appointed by a Board will be likely to visit the County Asylum at the same time that the Board make their stated quarterly visit and will be likely to have no opportunity to see the place except in its holiday dress, when it is the custom to have everything prepared for inspection, and “looking its level best.” Thus the Committee will ride out with the Board, dine at the Asylum with the Board, look over the house with the Board, make a favorable report to the Board, and the County will foot the bill and everything will be lovely. O, supremely practical Peter ,why art thou not divine as well as lachrymose!”

The Journal’s idea of an Asylum for the “incurable insane” is unsound, as setting forth a remedy for such cases as the one in view. Has not the Journal already published yearly many accounts of horrible treatment of insane persons. Witness the Jacksonville Illinois episode, which transpired so lately as to be recalled easily, and without more mental effort than the Journal is supposed to be able to make. Although I confess that my late experience has made me quite incredulous as to newspaper accounts of ill treatment of insane persons. For instance I know that Superintendent Lawson’s treatment of the insane at the Montgomery County Asylum has been uniformly kind and good. Under his administration Josephus Beach, as well as others, had larger liberty than ever before. He was allowed to be “out” even when I considered him to be dangerous. Through his freedom from constraint he was enabled to make attempts upon the life, not only of Mr. Lawson, but of one of his little children. With less humanity in the superintendent, Beach would, from prudential motives have been kept in constant confinement. It is an example of the perversity of human nature that Mr. Lawson should be condemned and executed at the block of Crawfordsville Journalism for the lack of qualities which he possesses in an eminent degree. Pardon me for so extended a preface and I will make my account as brief as possible. At my instigation, and through my affidavit a Coroner’s inquest was held upon the body of Josephus Beach on Friday, March 5, at Meharry’s School House in Coal Creek Township. Drs. Kelly and Philips of Pleasant Hill with Dr. Bass and myself made the post mortem examination in the presence of acting Coroner Squire JW Ramsay, a jury of gentlemen of the neighborhood, the Board of Commissioners, and the relatives and friends of the deceased.

The body was found in good state of preservation, neatly dressed in a decent suit of black cloth. The underclothing was neat and new. There was a large number of vermin disposed about the upper part of the chest and the face and in the edges of the hair bordering the face. All the witnesses I believe, testified that a part of these were head-lice. Three testified that a part of them were body-lice. I testified that I believed (and DO believe) that they were all headlice. The hair was densely populated with “nits” indistinguishable from the larvae of the head-louse. I have preserved specimens of these vermin and their larvae. On opening the skull the membranes enveloping the brain (dura mater and pla mater) were found united by extensive inflammatory adhesions of a remarkably granular aspect. These adhesions extended uninterruptedly from the fore to the back part of the brain along the inner edges down between the two halves of the brain in detached points. In the right half of the brain was a spot of inflammatory softening which had extended about an inch into the brain substance. The membrane being next to the brain (pla matter) was a remarkable specimen of meningeal congestion.

The superficial veins of the brain were immensely distended (varicose) with blood. The brain substance was dotted with hemorrhagic points, the ventricles contained a quantity of turbid serum. The upper portion of the spinal cord (medulla oblongata) presented no marked abnormal appearance. The contents of the chest and abdomen were not examined, as plenty of evidence of direct and remote causes of death was found in the brain. I have the left half of the brain at office preserved in alcohol as a remarkable anatomical specimen. The appearance was very similar to that presented by the brain of Adam Gray an epileptic who died at the Poor Farm in November. The verdict of the jury though singularly worded was scientifically correct. Sunstroke being simply a terrible congestion of the brain, was the first factor of the series. Epilepsy followed as an effect of the sun-stroke. The epileptic paroxysms increasing in severity produced finally, inflammation of the membranes, covering the brain (pla mater and dura mater) and points of inflammatory softening of the cerebral substances. Finally let me return my sincere thanks to the Meharry’s and other residents of Coal Creek, who were present at the post mortem examination. Although the Board of Commissioners rested under an odium (which just or unjust was equally manifest), the ample hospitality of Hugh and Isaac Meharry was freely offered and bountifully dispensed to the whole company. That the post mortem examination relieved the Board from the very embarrassing if not critical position in which they were themselves, was fully shown by the closing speech of David Meharry, who thanked the Board and their assistants for the promptness and energy with which the investigation had been made and the general interest manifested. Mr. JC Wingate (by the way a very clever young gentleman) also stated that the result of the investigation had not supported the statements made in his article as well as he would like… HW Taylor

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IVRY

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 8 February 1872 Lovena Ivry, an inmate of the' county asylum, died on Wednesday night of last week, of hemorrhage of the lungs. Samuel Mount, also an inmate of the asylum, died of consumption last Monday. This is the fourth death from consumption within thirty days. The general health at the asylum is reported by

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 7 November 1874 p1

Esquire John W. Ramsay started to the County Asylum this morning shortly after 10 o’clock to conduct an inquest over the body of Adam Gray, the insane pauper who died there last Tuesday morning. Gray was buried at the Asylum late on Tuesday evening. The circumstances of his death and the condition of the body when discovered on Tuesday morning seemed to justify suspicious or foul play and make an inquest necessary. The conversation of the inmates and one or two of their outside friends freely indulged in for the past few days, implicated Lawson, the superintendent, who was arrested this morning by Marshal Ensminger. The inquest has not been finished, and we are of course unable to say how much if any, evidence there is to justify the suspicion of murder against the Superintendent. From Daniel Mann, a stone cutter on Green Street, who was intimately acquainted with Gray and a frequent visitor at the asylum, we get the following statement: Mann was working in the stone yard on Tuesday when Lawson came to him and told him that Gray, being troublesome had been put in a cell about 10 o’clock Monday evening where he was found dead on Tuesday morning. Mann visited the asylum on Tuesday evening. He asked to be allowed to see the body of the dead man. Lawson made no objection, and he proceeded to the coffin. He found the lid fastened down, but succeeded in removing it sufficiently to allow him to see the front of the dead man’s body but not enough to examine it thoroughly. He found an ugly bruise on the forehead and right side of the head which he thought could not have been made by a fall, but was probably the result of a stroke with a slung shot or club. He had time only to make these observations before Lawson arrived. He then asked permission to watch the body during the night. This was granted, but Lawson returned in a short time and stated that he was going to bury the man that night. The burial took place accordingly, and he had no further opportunity to examine the body. Mann also states that an inmate of the asylum named Murphy, and others who saw the body, declare that there was a large hole in the back of Gray’s head from which the blood had run, forming a large pool on the cell floor. He speaks freely of the affair as “this murder.” Lawson, as already stated, is under arrest, and will have a preliminary examination as soon as the inquest is concluded, if there is any evidence discovered to justify the charge made against him. Until such examination public opinion will be suspended, as he may be proved to be entirely innocent, as we sincerely hope he is. Adam Gray, the deceased, was about 32 years of age. He was sent to the Insane Asylum from his home near Whitesville, two or three years ago, leaving a wife who has since married and moved away. He ws returned as incurable and has been an inmate of the county asylum for about 15 months.

Later – Persons who attended the inquest until the time of going to press state that a post mortem examination of the body of Gray developed nothing that would sustain the suspicions against Mr. Lawson and the jury will probably return a verdict of that effect. There were some ugly bruises on the side of Gray’s head but none but what might have been caused by falling. – transcribed by kbz

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, Dec 18, 1879 p 1

In the week opening Dec 8, 30 families received aid of Trustee (Joseph) Grubb. Only 3 of these were colored families, and they were afflicted in such a way as to be unable to work. There is not a colored person at the poor farm. Mr. Grubb manages to find work for every idle and able-bodied man who applies to him for aid. The average vagrant never applies twice, and don't hunt up the work either - transcribed by kbz

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, Dec 18, 1879

Since the completion of the new addition to the State Insane Asylum at Indianapolis, room has been secured for about 5-- new patients, and in accordance with the new requirements which do not admit of the entrance of epileptic persons, Justices Russell & Cumberland on last Saturday sat as a commission in lunacy on the insane inmates of the poor farm. As a result of their work five afflicted persons have been reported eligible to a home in Indianapolis, viz: Oliver Carey, 28 years old, and six years insane, captured in the woods near here, friends unknown; George VanSlyke, 43 years old, 22 years insane; John Hulet, 31 years old, 8 years insane; James Moore, about 66, four years insane; Ellen McCaw, 30 years old, insanity indefinite; Mary Duke, still quite young, but won't talk. They were taken to Indianapolis to-day. - transcribed by kbz

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William Monroe

Source: H W Beckwith History, Montgomery County, Indiana (Chicago: HH Hill) p 603

William Monroe, retired, Waynetown, was born in Sciota county, Ohio, October 2, 1812, and is the son of Jesse and Sarah (GORDON) Monroe. His mother was a member of the New Light church, and died in 1873. His father was a native of Maryland, and moved from there to Virginia, and in 1828 with his family settled in Union township, Montgomery county, and in 1836 moved to what is now Pratt county, Illinois, where he died in 1863. He was a member of the New Light church, and a democrat. William Monroe, the subject of this sketch, went with his father to Illinois in 1836, and remained there till November, 1865, when he returned to this county and settled in Wayne township. He was married January 28, 1835, to Miss Sarah J. MOORE, daughter of Allen Moore. Her folks came from the same county in Ohio that Mr. Monroe did. She is a member of the Christian church. They have had no children of their own, but have had thirty children under their care at different times. They have schooled twenty-four, and eight of the girls have been married at their house. These children have all been orphans, or at least have had one parent dead. So charitable have Mr. and Mrs. Monroe been in this direction that their house has often been called the "Orphans' Home." Mr. Monroe used to trade with the Indians, and in the early days he was quite renowned as a hunter, especially of deer. He is now in comfortable circumstances, and by reading and leisure enjoys with his wife the happiness of a mature and well spent life. Mr. Monroe is a democrat, voting first for Andrew Jackson. Thanks to Harry Bounnell for typing this one for us!

Source: Crawfordsville Star, March 24, 1893 -- Mrs. Sarah Hiner (Riner?: matron of the s' home was thrown from a buggy by a fractions horse and suffered several bruises and cuts on the face.

Source: Unknown newspaper

In reply to the Alamo correspondent concerning the number of acres the poor farm contains and the products therefrom the Journal will say that in March 1844 the Commissioners bought of Wm. Allen 142 1/4 acres which were devoted to the uses of the indigent poor. In October 1872, 40 acres were bought of WF Elston and added to the farm, making a total of 182 1/4 acres. There are about 125 under cultivation, the crops being 60 acres of corn, 30 acres of clover, 30 acres of wheat and five acres of potatoes. On their official visit to the farm in June the Board of Commissioners found on hand from last year's crop 500 bushels of wheat, 400 bushels of corn, 3 tons of hay, 65 stock hogs, 42 Spring pigs and 50 inmates. This we believe fully answers the correspondent's question. - transcribed by kbz

Source: Crawfordsville Indiana Star, March 31, 1887 p 3

The grand jury before adjourning returned a terrible indictment against the alleged Christian philanthropy of Montgomery County as expressed in her elecmosynary institutions. The six honorable and circumspect gentlemen who composed the very thoughtful and grave grand jury made a critical inspection of the county poor farm. They screwed up their courage and inspected and then came away and fumigated their clothes, bathed themselves in bay rum, and then wrote a scathing review of the affairs at the poor farm that ought to drive the well-fed Board of County Commissioners into doing their plain and imperative duty. From their careful and conscientious finding we reduce the facts to this effect: “We find the poor house and surroundings in a condition as good as could be expected with such poorly arranged and such beggarly furniture; and so far as it lies in mortal power the Superintendent, Mr. George Myers, has kept things cleanly and neatly. The jury would recommend the removal of the poor farm and poor house institutions to some other part of the county, six or eight miles from the city, near some creek or never failing stream of water suitable for drainage, and at least 40 acres of such farm to be timbered land. The present house is not suitable for the purposes of a county house; it is not arranged properly and cannot be so arranged except by the outlay of a vast sum of money. It needs new floors all over it. It is very badly in need of heat, now being heated by stoves and not at all suited for being fitted with furnace. The most objectionable feature is that the men and women are virtually lodged on the same floor, only a stairway separating them, the men being above and women on the floor below – thus increasing rather than decreasing the pauperism in our honored county. There are 41 paupers herded in 14 rooms, averaging 3 persons to each room. There is no bath room arrangements of any kind. The land is so near Crawfordsville as to be extremely valuable and the money realized from its cell could be well invested again as the jury has already pointed out. If the old house is to be used much longer it cn only be by most of the floors being repaired so as to prevent the breaking of limbs. 2d There must be an immediate purchase of a cooking range 3d. Two more cupboards, one for the kitchen and one for the dining room. 4th the pantry requires new shelving. 5th A change of bedding for each room. The jury recommend the immediate removal to a separate building of one John Maxwell, an epileptic, whose condition is so vile and filthy as to be a menace to all laws of health and cleanliness a constant invitation to pestilence and contagious diseases. Also the jury recommend additional privy vaults, those in use being filthy beyond description. There is a need of new stoves and stovepipes in nearly every room in the building. The cisterns all need repairs and several new pumps should be purchased at once. Also, the jury found the outbuildings in miserable repair and farming implements practically worthless, and recommend the purchase of new implements at once. The jury found plenty of provisions, bacon, potatoes, flour, etc. also found the live stock, ilk cows, hogs, etc. in excellent condition and plenty of hay and corn to feed them. The jury also inspected the ail and pronounced it is a net and well kept condition, but reported an absolute failure of the heating apparatus in use, and recommended a furnace which will comfortably heat the residence part and the cells and the hospital wards. The jury did a good day’s work when they drew up this ringing indictment.

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, May 3, 1877 p 1

During the winter the county farm had 79 occupants, of which number 10 died. By the coming of warm weather the number of paupers has been reduced to 59.

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Review, July 28, 1877 p 1

Instead of 65, there are but 57 inmates of the county asylum; 8 having left this week. Some of the women who had been confined there escaped the other night by jumping out of the window: Mary Phillips of the Alamo outrage was among the number. The Mrs. Croy who had been her landlady and had also been an inmate for a few weeks, left with her husband who had just finished serving out his sentence in the county jail.


HARVY (Harry?) SMITH

Source: Crawfordsville Review 6 Sept 1890 Harvy Smith, the young man who shot himself in the arm two months ago near Round Hill, and who was taken to the county asylum, died Monday night and was buried Tuesday. This unfortunate young man put the county to an expense of more than $150 for medical attendance, nursing, etc.

Fairly sure this is the one who is listed in the records as Harry Smith age 21 died Sept 1, 1890 - from Coal Creek Township (Round Hill is there) - sick -helpless - blood poisoned - buried at Waynetown by McClure Undertakers


Source: Crawfordsville weekly Journal 21 Feb1891

The grand jury made a surprise visit to the poor farm just at diner time Tuesday and were so taken with the appearance of things that they remained to partake of the meal which all pronounced splendid. All things at the farm are in a most prosperous condition and the eulogies of Mr. Myers are f faltering in the extreme. - thanks to Kim H for this neat find and Myers was one of the best who treated his people with great respect


Source: Crawfordsville Daily Journal 8 Jan 1894

Nat Hamilton died at the county house last Saturday evening at 5 o’clock. He had been deranged for several months, partly thought to have been caused by an injury to his head. The body was removed to the home of his brother, Tude Hamilton. The funeral occurred this afternoon at 2 o’clock conducted by Rev. GP Fuson. Interment at Oak Hill - kbz


Source: Crawfordsville Daily Journal 13 August 1890 William Watts, the one armed drayman, has had a pretty hard row to hoe for many years. His horses have died, his barns have been burned and finally his misfortunes have gotten the better of him. He is now an inmate of the County asylum.


Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 7 May 1897

Charles Hultz, an inmate of the county asylum, died Wednesday at 11 o'clock of epilepsy, he was twenty years of age and his mother lives seven miles northwest of town. Her son has been afflicted with epileptic fits since childhood and about four years ago he got so big that she was unable to manage him and so he was committed to poor farm. - transcribed by Kim H

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 17 July 1896

Geo. Myers, Superintendent of the Poor Farm, threshed ten acres of oats Monday which yielded 662 bushels, over 66 bushels per acre. He also threshed 385 bushels of wheat from 28 acres. - Kim H

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal 15 September 1888

Randolph. an old man who has been an inmate of the county asylum for a number of years, died Monday night. - transcribed by kbz

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ANTHONY NARA

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 4 February 1888

Anthony Nara died Sunday at the county asylum after a very tedious and painful illness from spinal disease. The deceased was a native of Ireland. The funeral took place Monday from St. Bernard's church. interment at Calvary cemetery.- Kim H

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 26 July 1890

Old Dutch, an inmate of the county asylum, passed by here Sunday afternoon frightening a few women and girls and making sport for the boys. - transcribed by Kim H -- see also John Huffman

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Source: Weekly Argus News March 18, 1893 p 1

The grand jury visited the poor farm yesterday afternoon and as they were sauntering around the house, Aunt Katie, an inmate, casually inquired of Supt. Lant Long, "I wonder why it is that they always get such wretchedly ugly looking old devils on the grand jury for, why don't they get nice looking young men, I'd like to know?" The Supt. did not answer, but grasped George Myers, the youngest member of that august body, and introduced him to the old lady with, "See her, Aunt Kate, what do you think of this man?" The demented old woman looked at Myers for a moment then clasped her hands and joyfully exclaimed, "Well, well, that's something like it, why he's the finest young gentleman that's been here." Myers blushed and acknowledged the compliment while his comrades howled in great glee, but the former has not yet determined who the horse is on.

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ROBERT OBENBACH

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Argus News April 22, 1893 p 7

Billy Reeves has received word announcing the death of Robert Obenbach at the insane asylum, at Logansport yesterday. Robert, it will be recalled, about one year ago called at the law office of White, Reeves & Humphrey and while interchanging the news of the day suddenly lost his mind and when Mr. Reeves suggested to him that he was crazy Mr. Obenbach resented the charge by drawing a corn cutter knife and making a break for William who met the onset with a chair. Obenbach was then taken to the poor farm where he was disarmed and given a room with a straw mattress. In the night for his amusement he struck a match and set fire to the bed and came very nearly being consumed in the flames. He was then taken to Logansport where he was confined until death released him. – kbz

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PAT SAVAGE - beaten

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 16 July 1892

Monday at the poor farm Pat Savage, an old man decrepit and powerless, was attacked by another inmate, A.J. Smalley, a powerful man, who used a slung shot to do his work and almost killed. His head was crushed and his arm rendered powerless. Savage is now bed fast and if inflammation sets in will die. Things seem to be managed in a rather peculiar manner at the county farm when incidents like this are allowed to occur.- Kim H

 

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Source: Crawfordsville Review, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 16 December 1893

After a tiresome but sometimes breezy session of 9 days duration, the regular December term of the board of county commissioners came to a close Wednesday evening. Among the last items of business to transact was to reappoint Charles Johnson as County attorney and Dr. W. B. Chambers as physician at salaries heretofore paid. On Thursday morning they went out on a tour of inspection, first visiting the county asylum and then to the jail in time to sit down and dine with Sheriff Davis. Before bringing the forenoon’s business to a close, however, the board reappointed Lant Long superintendent of the county asylum and farm. There were two other candidates for the position, Charles Myers and Mike Lannahan. - kbz

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 1 August 1891

Over the Hills. Trustee Hartman was sitting peace fully in his office July 29 when Charley Myers, who lives north of the city entered and after twirling his hat on his thumb in an embarrassed manner, said "Squooze me, Mist Hartman, but de oder day I found dot "Sassafras George" lying down in de road mit a sunstroke and if it had been mid-winter dot man would have been frozen to death."

George Courson, or "Sassafras George," as he is known, is a familiar object to our citizens, as for many years the old root peddler has plied his "trade in this vicinity. He would frequently get drunk and was overcome by the heat the other day when picked up by Mr. Myers.

Mr. Myers took the old fellow to his own home but as he failed to improve he applied to Trustee Hartman and "Sassafras George," aged 63, is now in the county asylum.

Owen Owens, aged 81 years, who has lived in this county nearly all his life and who is one of our very oldest citizens was also committed to the same asylum by the trustee yesterday. - thanks to Kim H - sad but interesting piece

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Source: Crawfordsville Review, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 16 December 1893 p 5 Commissioner Allowances GW Hall – Expense of poor $41.75 “ -- Expense County Asylum $74.75 Ed VanCamp – shoes for poor $32.00 J.W. Davis, expense of poor $2.50 DL Lee, Goods County Asylum $58.87 J.N. VanSandt groceries for poor $20.75 DL Lee groceries for poor $10.75 R.L. Sloan, groceries for poor $4275 WB Chambers, medicating poor $100.00 Richard Breaks, meat for poor $27.88 Manson Brothers, groceries for poor $26.75 Mike Long, rent for poor $12.00 James McClure burial of poor $14.50 Samuel Dazey, rent of poor $18.00 Tannenbaum Bros – goods for poor $57.50 Robinson & Wallace, repairs public bld’s $1.75 Patrick Slattery, bridge expense $89.0 Patrick Slattery, bridge expense $4.50 Thomas & Agnew bridge expense $12.50 Jerre Donahue, bridge expense $10.90 William Brothers, expense at jail $30.50 Thomas Boraker, salary courthouse janitor $105.00 Wm. F. Hunt services as county surveyor $112.50 Journal public printing .40 CW Elmore assessing $225.00 John W. Gilliland sprinkling streets $50.00 DL Lee, repairs of public buildings 1.00 Abe Levinson goods for poor $5.00 Douglas Griffith rent for poor $6.00 Mrs. M. Price, rent for poor $25.50 Gus Truitt, groceries for poor $83.60 JC Hutchinson expense county farm $2.25 CE Callhan, expense county asylum $72.00 JA McClure burial of poor $14.50 Finch Bros, expense of bridges $96.03 Jere Voris, burial of poor $14.50 AL Tomlinson, groceries for poor $86.10 John W. Utterback, burial of poor $50.00 James Israel, meat County Asylum $79.89 AL Tomlinson, groceries county asylum $8.50 WE Nicholson, rent for poor $39.00 Tim Casey, brick county farm $3.00 Manson Bros groceries for asylum $37.41 BF Crabbs, rent for poor $43.00 Benua Bros goods county asylum $46.65 Louis Bischof goods county asylum $39.65 JS Kelly, shoes for poor $41.50 Cumberland & Miller, rent for poor $43.00 Myers & Charni, goods county asylum $8.10 Houlehan & Quillen good for county farm $7.50 ES Simdson, expense on bridge $60.85 Sering & Clark same $15.00 AF Ramsey same $48.91 Frank Scaggs same .50 Seering & Clark, repairs for bridges $3.50 David Lewis, expense of bridge $94.82 Tim Carey, brick for asylum $3.00 Harry Endeau expense of bridge $3.00 Cohoon & Fisher, goods for asylum $4.80 A Kostanzer repairs for public buildings $2.90 Tinsley & Martin, goods county asylum … $6.55 Nye & Booe, supplies for public buildings $3.45 Geo Schleppy, meat for poor $14.15 George Butcher expense of poor $12.00 C’ville Lumber – goods for county asylum $10.50 McCllure & Graham expense of jail $58.50 Charles Davis, expense of criminals $137.30 Z. Mahorney, expense of criminals $17.50 TD Brown & Son goods for poor $3.90 Tim Casey. Expense of poor $12.00 Wm. T. Harlan expense of poor $84.00 Ed VanCamp goods for criminals $3.00 Tim Casey, Repairs for pub. Bldgs. $9.00 Tannenbaum – goods for poor $2.50 JC Fry, groceries for poor $121.10 Iral L. Brown medicating poor $25.00 Louis Bischof, repairs pub bldgs. .70 Fred Rogers, hauling $1.00 PB Bonnell, poor expense $6.00 Zack Williams rent for poor $16.00


Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 25 September 1896 Sam Mack died on Tuesday at the county asylum after a lingering illness. Mr. Mack was a well educated man and at one time had quite a prosperous business here, but met with sad reverses. - transcribed by Kim H

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Source Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 22 December 1893 Owen Owens died at the poor farm Friday and was buried Saturday. - thanks Kim H

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,17 November 1893

James Owens died Tuesday afternoon at the county poor farm, where he had been confined for some time because of unsoundness of mind. The deceased was first lieutenant of Company K, First Indiana, during the Mexican war. In this company R.E. Bryant and Loren Miller served. The deceased was a good soldier and a respected citizen. He leaves some property. Note: Buried Oak Hill - thanks to Kim HG

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal 12 June 1896 p 4

George F. Myers, Superintendent of the county poor farm, the other day sold 37 hogs that brought $165 which was a surprise to the county treasury.

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Review, Sat, May 1, 1897

The oldest in years of any inmate at the county poor asylum, Joel Leaming by name, died on Thursday afternoon and was buried in the cemetery belonging to the farm next day. Leaming was near 90 years of age and in the days before railways, carried on the flouring mill business in Ripley Township quite extensively for those times, and his brand of flour had an extensive sale. Bad luck, however, came to him and some years since he lost all his property. He had been an inmate of the farm only a few years. Previous to that time he resided with his daughters two of whom are living in the county.

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Source: Weekly Argus News, April 10, 1897 Insanity proceedings have been held upon the persons of Morris Mitchell (colored) and Samuel Sykes ,both inmates of the poor farm. Justices of the peace Stilwell and Hanna in conjunction with Drs. Cown and Keegan conducted the inquest. Both Mitchell and Sykes were found incurably insane and it was recommended that they be taken to the state asylum for the Insane at Indianapolis. Papers will be made out tomorrow and sent to the state board at Indianapolis for their admission. Source: Weekly Argus News April 17, 1897 p 1 Morris Mitchell (colored) an inmate of the county poor farm, who was recently adjudged insane by a lunacy commission was taken to the state asylum for the insane at Indianapolis this afternoon.

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Source: Crawfordsville Review 10 December 1897 p 9

The Asylums of the Past—The Expense to the County at Present— Some Inmates, Etc. "The poor ye have with ye alway's" is an ever present proverb. In all communities the improvident, the blind, the the lame and those subject to the infirmities of mankind are to be found. They must be taken care of, and the treatment accorded to human beings must be given them. Much charity is thrown away, and the recipients often injured by its bestowal, yet this cannot be prevented. While the world stands there will be houses and homes used for purposes of charity, and while it exists there will always be some on whom it must be bestowed. From about the first history of the county there have been persons in it needing aid and worthy of public charity. The first establishment of a home for the indigent and helpless in Montgomery county dates back to the year 1834-5. About the time of year the county purchased a small farm three miles southeast of Crawfordsville in what is now known as the Burk neighborhood. A long one-story frame house was erected upon the place, in which time ten or more rooms were constructed. Then some ten or twelve paupers were brought from different portions of the county, and the first county asylum was in running order. It was continued in this place, we understand, for about ten years. The highest number of inmates was generally from, twelve to twenty. The quarters became cramped for room and were considered too far from town, and it was determined by the county commissioners to seek a new location with a larger house and more land. Accordingly the present farm owned by the county was bought in 1845, of one Judge Ketchum, one of the associate judges of the county at that early day. It consists of 180 acres of good fertile soil, and the crops generally raised have been equal in amount and quality to the best to be found in any land in the county. The eastern portion of the present asylum was used as a house by Judge Ketchum previous to its sale to the county. Two additions have been added to it since its ownership by the county, the last one, the west side, having been completed some six years ago.

To manage the poor farm has always been considered a political plum, and each side has alternately placed the favorite in the position to superintend the farm and oversee the inmates. Geo. W. Hoel, now dead, had the management of the farm for a longer period than any one else before or since. He held the position twelve years, retiring something over ten years ago. He was succeeded by Geo. Myers, he by William Goben, who retained the place one Lant Long was keeper of the farm two years, when he was succeeded by Geo. Myers, the present incumbent. Mr, Myers receives a salary of $800.00 per year and is considered a good superintendent. The asylum at present has fifty two inmates, as large a number as has ever sojourned within its walls. There are 175 pounds of flour used every week in making bread for this assembly of persons. Last year seventy-two hogs the net weight of which wa9i250 pounds each, were slaughtered and salted down for use, all of which has been eaten, besides the carcasses of three or four beeves. The clothing, bedding, groceries, and repairs necessary on the building, require the expenditure of considerable money, and averages from $175 to 8200 per month. Taking into account the wheat raised on the farm for bread, the hogs raised for meat, potatoes, etc., there is yet lacking the sum of about (4,000 to get the institution through successfully from year to year, and this amount the county pays. Mr. Myers is said to be an efficient manager of the farm and the unfortunates under his control.

While the office of superintendent of the asylum is considered a political plum for the life of us, we cannot understand why any man should crave the place, even if the salary were three times the amount of what it is now. An hour or two among the poor, poverty stricken people there, the infirm, the lame, the indigent, etc., is enough to satisfy most people for a long time, and we would be perfectly willing for Mr. Myers or any other man to retain the population for life time. There are two incurably insane persons at the asylum who have been there for many years, and a number of others who could be termed as silly or semi-idiotic. For all time this home is theirs, and to remain there till they fill paupers' graves, of which there are quite a number just a short distance to the southwest of the building. The oldest inmate of the asylum at this time is a woman. She was brought to the asylum when a young girl, in May, 1883, nearly thirty-five years ago. One of the oldest inmates of the place is an insane man named Cary who has been "on the county for over 25 years." He was found in the woods near Linden and brought to the asylum. He is incurable but where he came from or who were his relatives has never been discovered. The oldest in years of existence is Mike Gerbrick. He is 83 years old and is quite feeble. Old Bill Watts is again an inmate of the poor asylum. Watts, in his youth, was a very industrious man and made money but bad luck attended him. He was at one time marshal of Crawfordsville, was a fearless officer, and preserved order too. He unfortunately acquired the habit of drinking intoxicants and went down fast. He will perhaps always be considered as a fixture where he is now until called hence. - kbz

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CHRISTMAS

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 30 December 1898

CHRISTMAS AT THE POOR HOUSE All the Observation There is at the Expense of the.Superintendent, Mr. Myers. At Christmas tide very few people think of the poor house and of how the world-wide festival is celebrated there. At the Montgomery county poor house there are fifty-three unfortunates and they enjoy the good things of the Christmas time just as much as anyone—more, perhaps, than the ordinary person from the fact that the joys of the glad season come to them in small quantity. Supt. Myers always does his best to make the inmates enjoy themselves on the great holiday and he does well, too, considering the fact that he has personally to bear all the expense. Naturally, with fifty-three persons to make glad outside of his own family, he doesn't haunt the jewelry stores to any alarming extent, But they have Christmas at the poor farm just the same. The first year Mr. Myers was superintendent he prepared for a jolly Christmas at the home. The former superintendent had raised no turkeys, so Mr. Myers bought enough to give all a good dinner and then gave additional joy-by supplying each inmate with a package of candy. When he made his report to the commissioners he included these items and they were promptly thrown out, the commissioners plainly informing him that the county would foot no such bills. Mr. Myers paid himself, therefore, and has ever since kept up the custom he began. He raises his own turkeys, however, and so saves a material portion of the cost. It requires about twenty-five pounds of candy, and while Huyler isn't bothered with the order, a good wholesome quality is purchased and the joy it affords the poor inmates of the home amply repays Mr. Myers for his outlay.

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1897 - judged insane

Source: Crawfordsville Indiana Weekly Argus News, April 3, 1897 p 3 Willard F. Buxton has been appointed guardian of Lizzie B. Jolly, a person of unsound mind Source: Weekly Argus News, April 10, 1897 p 4 Insanity proceedings were this Wednesday held over the person of Lizzie B. Jolly of Wingate, Dr. Keegan assisted by justices of the Peace, Stephen A. Stilwell and Wm. T. Hanna held the inquest. Mrs. Jolly was found to be of unsound mind and in a condition dangerous to the community. Papers were made out in the afternoon and she was taken to the asylum for the insane at Indianapolis. Mrs. Jolly's condition is attributed to a fall sustained while a child, which affected her spinal cord and which now has caused insanity. -

Note it is known for sure that Mitchell came back to the poor farm (it was standard they'd send them away to Indianapolis to the insane asylum where they would just basically declare them incurably insane and send 'em back to the prospective counties. Morris Mitchell died in 1900 at the poor farm. It is not known at this time what happened to Samuel Sykes or Lizzie Jolley (other than Lizzie was indeed sent to the insane asylum shortly after the article


Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 27 January 1899

The Greenlee boy, who has given the police and truant officer so much trouble has been taken to the poor farm where he is to remain confined until he is old enough to send to the penitentiary, in case he should hereafter break the law. He does not seem to have any degree of knowledge that he has done anything wrong when he takes horses, whips, caps, etc., and while he does not deny doing the acts, it seems as though he has no remorse at all for his deeds. The boy is to be pittied for his seeming utter lack of being able to determine right from wrong. - transcribed by Kim H.


Source: Crawfordsville, Indiana Daily-News Review March 12, 1901 p 1

Theodore A. Aikens, aged 57 years, died with consumption this morning at the county house where he had been an inmate for two months. The burial took place this afternoon at the farm cemetery short services being conducted by Rev. Nave.


TRENTON

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 11 September 1896 Her First Hide on the Cars. Mrs. Samuel Trentor, an inmate of the county poor asylum, has gone to Waynetown to visit her children, John Trentor and Mrs. Hannah Dermitt. Mrs. Trentor is 85 years of age and has lived in Montgomery county over 50 years, but her trip to Waynetown is the first she has ever made on the cars. She has been an inmate of the county asylum about two or three years, her husband dying there.

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O'Mara

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 4 August 1888 the Managers of the Insane Asylum return a Corpse to This County Nude A few days since Wm. O'Mara, an inmate of the State Insane Asylum, died. He was adjudged insane and sent to the institution from this county, and hence when his death occurred the* corpse was returned here for burial. It came in a rough hospital coffin, and horrible to relate had been dumped rudely Into the box perfectly nude. The man undoubtedly had clothing when he was sent to the institution, or if he had not the county of Montgomery would have furnished it on application. This Incident speaks volumes for the management of the Insane Asylum and the tender care exorcised by those in charge, and the economic administration of affairs at that institution. These tendered hearted authorities supposed probably that poor Bill O'Mara was "only a pauper whom nobody owned," and any way to get his body off of their hands would answer. Montgomery county takes cane of her citizens and on the arrival here of the remains they were examined and interred an humanity dicated. This dumping of the unfortunate dead, who have to be cared for at public expense is on par with the charges made by the committee and proven. Out with such places and place the care of the insane of the State in the hand* of those whose sense of justice and instincts of humanity have not become paralyzed. Such things as these demand an investigation, and while there is no law to punish those who commit the act, there is a way to rid the State of their services. "Turn the rascals out."

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 1 August 1891 Over the Hills. Trustee Hartman was sitting peace fully in his office July 29 when Charley Myers, who lives north of the city entered and after twirling his hat on his thumb in an embarassed manner, said "Squooze me, Mist Hartman, but de oder day I found dot "Sassafras George' lying down in de road mit a sunstroke and if it had been mid-winter dot man would have been frozen to death." George Courson, or "Sassafras George," as he is known, is a familiar object to our citizens, as for many years the old root peddler has plied his "trade in this vicinity. He would frequently get drunk and was overcome by the heat the other day when picked up by Mr. Myers. Mr. Myers took the old fellow to his own home but as he failed to improve he applied to Trustee Hartman and "Sassafras George," aged 63, is now in the county asylum, Owen Owens, aged 81 years, who has lived in this county nearly all his life and who is one of our very oldest citizens was also committed to the same asylum by the trustee yesterday.

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 30 June 1899

Taken to the Asylum Sheriff Canine and Deputy Barton Wednesday took Alfred Wells to the insane asylum at Indianapolis. Wells appeared in pretty good spirits, but was very quiet and gave no trouble on the trip over

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Source: Indiana Death Certificate 1912 Bk 10 p 327

Isaac W. SHIPMAN died Montgomery County Poor Asylum Union Twp, Montgomery County, Indiana on March 7, 1912 aged 76 Years 7 Months 23 Days of Extreme exhaustion from Arterio sclerosis Dr. Schenck attended him from March 4 to March 7th when death occurred at 8:30 a.m. Widowed he was born in Indiana July 9, 1835. Parents are unknown and he was a laborer. The informant was James Cleveland. Buried 3-8-1912 at Oak Hill Cemetery by Perry F. Harwood, Undertaker -kbz

Source: Crawfordsville Review March 7, 1912 p 8 Isaac Shipman, aged about 76 years, died at the county asylum Wednesday night, death being caused by lagrippe, after an illness of a short time. Mr. Shipman was a resident of Linden and had been brought to the county asylum Sunday night. He is survived by a son, Frank Shipman of Linden. Source: 1870 VanBuren Twp, Fountain Co IN – he is living with his parents, John age 75 and Catherine 72 with children Eunice 7 b Ill; George 4 Ill and Charles 2 born Indiana. Frank is George age 4 above (7 Nov 1864 – 15 March 1959 Linden Cemetery

Isaac registered for the draft in Blair Twp Clay Co Illinois 1863-1865 – Isaac W. Shipman born Indiana age 26 Cooper married - Union Side Karen Zach Name: Isaac Shipman Side: Union Regiment State/Origin: Illinois Regiment: 13th Regiment, Illinois Infantry Company: G Rank In: Private Rank Out: Private Film Number: M539 roll 82

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 25 July 1874 Robert Obershane, living at the residence of V. W. Clark, a short distance northeast of town, was last day examined by a medical commission presided over by Esquire John W. Ramsay and pronounced a fit subject for the insane asylum. Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 6 March 1873 Mary Davis, an old lady and an in mate of the county asylum, fell last Friday and broke her right aim and received other injuries. It is thought she will not recover.

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 13 February 1892 Our Colony in the Asylum -- Montgomery county is only allowed twenty representatives in the lunatic asylum at Indianapolis and the authorities here have been notified by the asylum management that there are already 35 there and more are arriving by almost every train. The Asylum people are preparing to call a halt. They say that every Montgomery county man who is a little queer or who gets in the way of some one else is unceremoniously arrested and shipped over to the asylum.

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Source: Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 18 April 1891 A pauper named Sandlin, aged 48 years, died at the poor asylum yesterday. -------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------

Source: Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 2 March 1889

You that are always complaining of your share of this world's fate should have seen poor John Huff who died at the poor farm, Monday at the advanced age of 75. After battling with a cruel world and seeing the bright sunshine of a happy and prosperous career he succumbed to the dealings or a mysterious power and throwing off all vestige of pride entered the paupers' home. He welcomed death and the remains were laid to rest in the county grave yard, a pauper without a friend to regret his death.

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 10 February 1859 p 2

We understand that at the solicitation of the Committee appointed at the last meeting for the relief of the poor, a number of the young men of town have consented to give a Musical and Dramatic Entertainment at McClelland’s Hall on Saturday Evening for the benefit of the Poor Fund. A general turn out of the citizens is requested. Admittance 25 cents

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Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 12 November 1898

Will Be Sent to the Asylum- Miss Theodoria (Dora) Brown, living west of the College, was declared by an insanity commission to be of unsound mind, and will be taken to the Central asylum at Indianapolis for treatment.

Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 21 March 1872

From the report of Dr. W. L. Johnson, County Physician, for the year ending March 1, 1872, we get the following concerning the county asylum: Total enrollment, 57; remaining, 25; average. 25 of the 25 remaining, 7 are idiots, 4 imbeciles, 1 maniac, 1 paralyzed, 3 3 lame, 3 old age, 2 children, and a deaf and dumb family. There have been two births this year. Three boys have been bound to farmers. The deaths have numbered five, four of are reaping a rich harvest. consumption and one of apoplexy. No case of fever of a malignant, contagious or typhoid type has appeared. The Asylum has been kept in fair condition, and with economy.

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Source: Crawfordsville Review February 15, 1890

The Oldest Pauper, Susan Record, the oldest pauper at the poor farm and an inmate longer, perhaps, of such an institution than any other in the state, died on Monday afternoon. The record of inmates show that she entered the county asylum in the year 1840 at age 60 years of age. This would figure her residence there at 50 years and her age 110 years. This last is not believed to be correct and her age is thought to be about 85 years. Her husband, many years ago, committed suicide on account of some crime charged against him, and her children, some three or four in number, she had not seen for along time before her death. The cost of board for the old woman was probably $200 per year. This for fifty years would make the sum of $10,000 that Montgomery county has paid for her maintenance. Crawfordsville Review November 12, 1898 Filled a Pauper's Grave. The man found dead in a car on the Monon road last week was buried on Saturday evening in the cemetery attached to the poor asylum, no word having been received from relatives or friends—if he had any. From word received from Chicago it was learned that the deceased had followed the occupation of a peddler, had been in poor health and was about 28 years of age. --

JACOB STEIN

Source: Crawfordsville Review November 1898

Body Disinterred. The body of Jacob Stein, the tramp who committed suicide here last week by banging himself in a Monon box car, has been disinterred and shipped to Chicago. The disinterment was at the instance of the United Hebrew Charities of Chicago who having heard of the suicide and thinking the victim might be a member of their race, sent a representative here Wednesday to investigate. When the body was taken up it was proven to belong to that nationality and was consequently taken to Chicago for re-burial. While Stein was unknown to this society it is a part of their religion to see that no Hebrew is buried in a pauper's grave!

WILLIAM CLEVENGER

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 7 March 1902

William Clevenger, aged 39 years died Sunday at the county Asylum of pulmonary tuberculosis. The Funeral occurred Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock - thanks to Kim H

ORPHAN HOME

Crawfordsville Daily Journal Feb 5, 1923 One by one are the sturdy old pioneer families that made our county one of the best in the state, passing away. Laura Misner Mastin who died so suddenly of heart failure the 28th of January was the last member of the well known Benjamin Misner family. This eminently respected family came from Ohio back in the forties. Mr. Misner was elected sheriff of this county a few years after coming here. Laura Misner, the daughter of Benjamin and Elizabeth Misner, was born at Smartsburg, Sept. 6, 1852. Here she grew to young womanhood and attended the public school at this place. On July 27, 1884, she was married to John W. Mastin, her schoolmate and neighbor. To this union two children were born, Mrs. Morris C. Etter of Lafayette and Charles B. Mastin of Vanada, Montana. They lived on the farm at Smartsburg until 1904 when they came to Crawfordsville, that their daughter might complete her education in the high school. They also took charge of the orphan's home this same year. Mrs. Mastin was brought up in the old school Baptist faith. Her parents lived near the Church. They had a large commodious house and their hospitalities knew no bounds. Everybody was welcome at the Misner home. Mrs. Mastin was never affiliated with any Church but devoutly believed in the heavenly Father and His Son, and there are few who walked more closely in the footsteps of the Lowly Nazarene than she. Her religion was the practical kind, the kind that counts. Many responsibilities were thrown upon her. She cared for her aged parents most tenderly. Relatives that were homeless were seen after carefully by she and her husband. She was often at the bedside of the sick and afflicted, not as a mere guest but as a helper. Self sacrifice was her makeup, always cheerful, honest in the most minute detail. You seldom see as gracious a giver as she and yet very economical. It was often remarked that she saved in order to give to others. She was recognized as a peace maker wherever she lived. She loved peace and harmony but so disliked discord. If anyone would mistreat her, she would return to them a kindness, thereby heaping coals of fire upon their own head. Her devotion to her husband was marked. They were truly each other's affinity. They shared each other's joys and sorrows in such a manner that the joys were doubled and the sorrows halved. There seemed no task too arduous for her to perform for her children and the mutual feeling of love and affection between she and her grandchildren was often spoken about. Besides the husband, son and daughter. five grandchildren survive; also a number of nieces and nephews and hosts of friends. The funeral was preached by Rev. Airhart at the old Baptist Church, Jan. 31st, Wednesday afternoon. She was carried to her grave in the beautiful Oak Hill by her nephews. The mound was left a bower of sweet fragrant bloom, suggestive of the home she had just entered. M.S.E.

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Source: Crawfordsville Review March 18 1919

County Home News – Mr. and Mrs. Arnold Houston are spending the weekend with his mother at Wabash, Ind. CB Dunbar and wife spent Sunday at Darlington.. Mrs Ella Cutter is going to work at the County Home this summer. Mr. and Mrs. CB Dunbar spent Monday in Indianapolis on business. The commissioners spent Tuesday at the County Home. Mrs Grace Watson and daughter Mildred spent Sunday at the County Farm .

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You might also be interested in the biography of Thomas J. Hole who was the one mentioned above as superintendent and was still such in 1881 when the biography was written. .

Source: Crawfordsville Star, May 31, 1887 p 1

T.J. Hole, the keeper of the county farm, has in an unusually large acreage of corn, but owing to cold weather had to replant a large portion of it.

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Alex SPORE

d. May 23, 1947 at 6:00 p.m. buried Mace K of P. on May 25th male white d. County Farm b. Dec 4, 1863 Indiana age 83 Y 5M 19D widowed Father; William Spore b. Indiana Mother: Elizabeth b. Indiana Laborer d. Myocarditis 4 weeks and hypertension Fred N. Daughetery, MD buried Mace Knights of Pythias. (Can't read undertaker) Death Record H-37 p 247

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HUGH McDONALD

Crawfordsville Journal Crawfordsville, Montgomery County Indiana Nov 28, 1910 p 1 "Brick Fell On Head And He Never Recovered - Once Wealthy Contractor In Muncie Dies In Montgomery County Poor House" Hugh McDonald died at the County asylum at 8 on Sunday. He has been at the poor farm for many years and has as far as is known no relatives in the country. He came to the US from Edinburg, Scotland, and for many years was a prominent building contractor in Muncie, Ind. While doing a job at that place a brick fell from a high wall and lit on his head and almost killed him. He finally recovered but has never been right mentally since. His funeral will take place at St. Bernard Church on Tuesday morning at 9 with burial at Calvary Cemetery.

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JOSEPH FRITZ

Crawfordsville New Review, Saturday, May 27, 1899 --Joseph Fritz, aged 82, died at the poor farm this forenoon and the body was prepared for shipment by D.C. Barnhill and sent to his friends near Indianapolis. He has been an inmate of the institution for 15 years and one of the old timers and from the effects of a stroke of paralysis has not walked for 19 years. Another stroke Sat. was the cause of his death.

Crawfordsville Weekly Argus News May 27, 1899 -- Joseph Fritz died at the poor farm this morning from paralysis. He was 72 years of age and had been an inmate the county farm for over 17 years. The remains will be taken to Indianapolis for burial.

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THESE FOLKS ARE BURIED ON THE FARM WHERE THEY LIVED OUT THEIR LIVES :(

JAMES BEARD

Source: Montgomery County Death Record #17

Died 5-22-1915 at 6 p.m. at age 71 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He had been at the farm since 1872 . Dr. F.O. Schenck with informant Bert Knight, the county farm superintendent. He was born in New York . Kim Hancock found the New York Episcopal Diocese of NY James Beard born Dec 9, 1844 and baptized March 9, 1845 son of Joseph and Ellen Beard. See Jimmie Beard below.

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JOSEPHUS BEACH

Source: Crawfordsville Indiana Star, March 2, 1875 p 3

The highly sensational account of the death of Josephus Beach which appeared in the Crawfordsville Journal of last week is the product of the fertile brains of the narrators. The man Beach had no body lice on him during his stay at the Poor Farm. I will notice this matter more in detail next week.

WH Taylor, MD - County Physician

Same - same page

Josephus Beach, an inmate of the Poor Farm long since adjudged incurably insane died last week and was buried near his old home in Coal Creek Township. On the coffin being opened at the funeral the friends found the unfortunate man completely eaten up by body lice. As one would suppose this terrible development will cause an investigation of the management of the county farm, and the sooner this investigation is made the better. The unfortunate man is said to have personal property enough to have kept him comfortable and decent and his friends now see why he did not receive the merited care and attention. Why the poor fellows condition has not been looked into long since, we are unable to conjecture.

Note: There is no Joe Josephus ... in the CDPL listing or the findagrave.com

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NOAH BENNETT

Poor Farm Cemetery

Born: 14 Feb 1881. Lists Wm. Bennett of Grand Rapids Michigan on WWI Registration as next of kin and Omer Bennett on WWII Grand Rapids, MI. He was unemployed on the WWII and working for Herbert Peebles as farming on the WWI listing. Listed as medium build; tall, with light hair and blue eyes. Died at the home about 6 December 1961 (obit in 8th newspaper - will have to read this).

My genealogy buddy, Kim Hancock found his death record that liists him dying from hypertension (Death #61-042945). He died 8 December 1961 at the poor farm and was buried there on the 11th. His parents are Elmer P. Bennett and Martha A. Bennett. Dr. Fred Daughterty was a physician who pronounced him dead at 7:40 a.m. Mrs. Frank Newlin, the home's matron, filled out the death record information. Kim found his middle name as Emmet. So, RIP Noah Emmet Bennett.

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Clarence "DOC" BOTTORFF

Poor Farm Cemetery - July 28, 1907 died Feb 17, 1967 . He was married to Margaret Katherine Carver Roche (1912-1973) and they had two sets of twins, infant male twins born in 1934 and Rose Marie and Roselyn Lee born in 1934.

"Doc" is Clarence born the 28th of July 1907 to Elbert and Estelle Moore Bottorff. He was a pipe fitter, married twice #1 Catherine Carver and #2 Mildred Miller but not for long as in each of the census records he is listed as "single." He lived at the poor farm for quite some time and was listed as having a year's worth of high school. He died 17 Feb 1967 of carcinoma of the throat.

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WARHIM BRANSON

Source: Death Certificate, Montgomery County, Indiana #36953

According to the above, Warhim (hard to read his name - copy can be found on findagrave if anyone wants to tackle it but best Kim and I can decipher is Warhim) died at the farm on the 16th day of November 1937. The farm's doctor, Dr. Fred Daughtery cared for him from Sept 10 1936 to his death at 5:20 p.m. Nov 16th, 1937. He suffered a fractured hip on the first date above and died the 2nd with a cerebral hemorrhage. He was 77 years old and never married. He was born in Tennessee as were his parents, Thomas and Easter Loy Branson. He was buried on the farm 11-18-1937 by Hunt & Reeves.

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RACHEL GALLAMORE BUTCHER

Source: Montgomery County, Indiana Death Certificate 25437.

Died at the Montgomery County Poor Farm August 4, 1935 of uterus cancer and nephritis at 11 a.m. She was married to William Butcher. Born July 16, 1862 in Ireland her father was Nathan Gallamore, and mother Sarah Potter, both also born in Ireland. Seth Swank, County Farm Superintendent gave the information and the undertaker, Noble Reeves buried her on the farm August 6.

She married twice, William Bennett (1859-1912) and William M. Butcher (1863-1942) and is listed in the 1930 Farm census as "Bell Butcher"

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EMMA CALL

Source: Indiana Certificate of Death #16773

states that Emma died at age 65 on May 17, 1931 and was born in Indiana. She was female, white and single. Died 6 a.m. of myocarditis. Her parents and their birth places were completely unknown on the death certificate. The Informant was the County Farm Superintendent Bert Dunbar and Dr. Fred Daugherty, the farm doctor took care of her from January 1st to her passing. Proffit & Sons buried her in the "pauper cemetery." I suspicion she is a daughter of Stephen Call a Corporal in the Civil War buried in Oak Lawn Cemetery, Bristow Cemetery, Creek County, Oklahoma and Melvina Smith who were married 29 April 1849 in Hendricks County, Indiana. He served as a post master in Ingalls, Payne County, Oklahoma in 1898. He was born 25 June 1824 and died 16 Jan 1916 and he and Minerva had a daughter, Emma age 14 in the 1880 census. Time will hopefully answer this question of her parentage. Ado34ed

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CLAUDE CLOE CAMPBELL

Source: Death Certificate & WWI Registration

When Claude Cloe Campbell registered for the WWI draft, his mother signed for him as Guadian because he was "physically disabled and feeble-minded." He had no occupation but was described as being of medium height, medium weight, and having brown eyes and black hair. He was 18, and registered on 9-12-1918 by C. Harding. His death record # 69-019055 gives his birth as 9-5-1900, which goes perfectly with the WWI draft information. He died May 13, 1969 at Culver Hospital, in Crawfordsville. He was a resident of the farm at least 40 years and was buried there 5-15- by Hunt & Son Funeral Home. He passed from hypostatic pneumonia and his parents are listed as Marion Campbell and Rose Bell Plunkett. He died on the 13th at 3:35 a.m. Dr. Wesley Shannon.

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David CARLISLE

Source: Death Record 20038

My "farm pal," Kim Hancock found David Carlisle who was born on the 4th of July in 1854 in Indiana, son of John C. who was born in Scotland and Anna Ridge Carlisle, born in Ohio. He was married to Fannie Bennett Noth but they were divorced. They had at least one child, Celia. He died 24 June 1925 of a cerebral hemorrhage. He was buried the 25th "on the Co. Farm." by Proffit & Son and the informant on his death record was Mahlon Carlisle, his brother

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Mahlon CARLISLE

Source: Death Record 249668

Odd that two brothers are buried at the farm, but according to their death certificates they are. Mahlon gave the information but Mahlon's information is quite different - the parents are listed the same but the places of birth definitely not. Plus, John C. on David's becomes John G. on Mahlon's and the birth places of the parents are definitely different. John G. is listed as his father born in Indiana and Ann Ridge born in Indiana. Mahlon was buried on the farm August 26, 1942 two days after his death by the Hunt & Son Funeral Home group. In the 1920 census, he lives alone and is a laborer at the Casket Factory. In 1930, he lived at the poor farm. He died on the farm after falling out of bed (at age 84 years 8 months 6 days) and heading his head. Ida C. Clark, relationship unknown, but would imagine a sister, gave the information.

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PAUL HENRY COX

listed on findagrave - no dates, no proof

Source: Death Certificate, Montgomery County, Indiana

Born 21 August 1897 son of John J. and Mattie. Died at the Montgomery County Home after surgery - dehydration - 16 September 1967. Listed as a laborer and never married

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GEORGE "Sassafras" CARSON

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, August 18, 1899

Sunday night at the poor farm Geo. Carson paid the penalty of the human race and breathed his last. Mr. Carson was seventy years old and had been an inmate of the county asylum for about eight years. He used to be a familiar character about the streets of the city and went by the nickname of "Sassafras" George. He was an indefatigable purveyor of sassafras and was always on hand in the season with bunches of the fragrant root which he claimed *was nature's remedy for all diseases of the blood. He was buried Monday evening at the farm. - thanks to Kim H

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GEORGE CARSON

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 19 August 1899

GEORGE CARSON, a well-known character who answered to the name of "Sassafras George," died at the poor house Sunday night. He was 80 years of age and had been an inmate of the county infirmary for some eight years. He earned a few pennies in the spring peddling bunches of sassafras from house to house. He was buried in the potter's field at the institution - transcribed by Kim H

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ALEXANDER CROCKET

Birth: 1825 Death: Feb. 5, 1900

Source: Weekly Argus News Feb 10, 1900 p 1 Alexander Crocket, an old colored man who was in the employ of Thompson & Bland, horse dealers for a number of years, died yesterday at the poor farm. He was 75 years of age. The burial took place at the cemetery on the county farm. Source: Indiana Certificate of Death Montgomery County #76 Alexander Crocket - male - Black Paul J. Barcus attended the deceased from Feb 4th to Feb 6 that he died on Feb 6th of a cerebral hemorrhage - 3 days duration Alexander Crocket resides Crawfordsville, Indiana born Virginia Occupation: Laborer - died County haus (sic) Buried: County Farm No father/mother or their birth places given Buried Feb 7, 1900 Carver & Robbins Undertakers Crawfordsville, Indiana

Source: 1850 census Morgan Co Indiana #353 Henry Stewart Farmer VA Petina 25 IN Lucinda Crockett 34 (54?) rest b. VA John Stewart 29 PE Stewart fem 25 Alexander Crocket 22 Robert 20 LD 18 Sanda ? M. (male) 18

Source: Washington twp Morgan County Registration for Civil War- no date assume early 1861 -- Crocket, Alex 35 Colored Farmer single b VA F.P.V. beside his name -- Capt. D. Braden

Source: 1870 Morgan Co IN #263 Allen Watkins 48 Farmer 10,000/2500 all Ind Catherine 24 Kate 24 Fanny 18 John 21 Mary 12 Hatley, Eroy 29 Farmer Ind Crockett, Alexander 42 Black Farm Lab VA

Source: 1880 Census Martinsville Morgan Co Indiana Alex Crockett age 50 born Virginia Black Male Single - father and mother b Virginia Works in Livery stable Lives with (Household #318) Permelia Steward Black age 60 VA VA VA (sister?) Lucinda her daughter 19 and Lon born in Dec grandson [Edit Bio] [Link family members] [Add Marker Transcription] [Add Note] Burial: [Edit]

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Source: Crawfordsville Star "City News" -- June 23, 1881 p 1

Hiram Edwards, aged about 60 years died at the county farm yesterday. (assuming he is likely buried there but need to read the other two obituaries - Weekly Review 25 June p5; Saturday Evening Journal 25 June p1 - hopefully one of these would tell for sure if he was buried there) Source: Crawfordsville Star, June 23, 1881 p 1 – Hiram Edwards, aged about 60 years, died at the county farm yesterday.

Source: County Farm Cemetery Crawfordsville Montgomery County Indiana, USA [Add Plot] Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Created by: Karen Zach Record added: Jan 26, 2017 Find A Grave Memorial# 175742138

 

ERWIN, Oscar Lane

Source: Indiana Certificate of Death Montgomery County Farm, Union Township, Montgomery County, Indiana #33677

Oscar L. Erwin (sic)

Male White SIngle - never marr

Died; Nov 2, 1933 at 10:30 a.m.

born: 1885

Age: 48 years

Dr. Fred N. Daughtery - gives Bronchio Pneumonia as cause - sick 10 days

Born: Indiana

Father; Joe Ervin (sic) born Indiana

Mother: Alwilda Lowery b Ind

Informant: Carrie Chapman Crawfordsville

Buried County Farm Nov 4, 1933 by Utterback & Murphy

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FISHER, Arthur

- no information - listing from CDPL

Indiana Certificate of Death born 5-17-1881 Lansing, Michigan. Died County Home 11-2-1961. Parents: Unknown

Arteriosclerosis & Gastric Carcinoma

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FLYNN, P. J.

- no information - listing from CDPL

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HALL, Idell

b. Jan. 23, 1906 d. Jul. 15, 1970

She was the daughter of Jacob and Flora Hall and seems to be their only child. She was at the poor farm for at least 30 years.

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HUGHES, James H.

Source: Death Record #11987

Died Mont Co Poor Farm Union Twp Montgomery County, Indiana April 23, 1927

Dr. BF Hutchings, took care of him from March 1927 to Apriol 23, 1927 - he passed at 5 a.m. of organic heart disease

Born: Jan 4, 1853 in Indiana

Father: James H. Hughes born Ken.

Mother: Lavina Miller born Ind.

Occupation: Farmer

Informant: David W> Hughes, Crawfordsville

Buried Youngs Chapel by Proffitt & Son 4-24-1929 of Crawfordsville, Indiana

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KEYS, Henry

Assuming this is the man who was in the 1920 census of the poor farm as a widower. May not be though - found only one Henry Keys throughout our county but may be two different people. A Henry Keys died in Union Township (usually said poor farm or something similar but this one was only Union Township which is where the Poor Farm home was indeed) on November 7, 1925 of cancer of the face. He was born 4-15-1842 (which doesn't go real well with Henry's approximated age in the 1920 census of 71). THe census said he was born in Indiana (both accounts agree with that) His father (who is Joseph Keys on the Death Record) in Germany (Death record says Ohio) and Mother (Margaret Lytle) in Ohio (agrees). He was a retired farmer, and Alva Karsner gave the information for the death.

Buried Waynetown Cemetery 11-11- by Proffits Funeral Home. In the 1860 Ripley Twp, Montgomery County, Indiana Census, his father is passed and he and brother Edward lives with Margaret Keys age 65 and Elizabeth Carsner (which makes sense that both men found, the one with the DR and the one in the poor farm) and in this record at age 18 he is listed as "idiotic."

In the 1900 census, he is with the half sister ? Elizabeth Carsner age 71 and Alva Carsner who gave the information on the death certificate. In 1910, he again lives with them, Alva the head of the household this time, Elizabeth his mother age 82 and Henry Keys 68. Elizabeth died 29 December 1915 (born Ohio 30 July 1828 and is also listed as single on her death record - George Kershner father, Margaret Lytle, mother.

Alva married VERY late in life on 25 August 1927 (born 16 Dec 1863 in Montgomery County - father John Karsner, mother Elizabeth Lytle wife Rosie Smith.

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LEAMING, Joel

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Review Sat, May 1, 1897

The oldest in years of any inmate of the county poor asylum, Joel LEAMING by name, died on Thursday afternoon and was burried (sic) in the cemetery belonging to the farm next day. Leaming was near 90 years of age and in the days before railways, carried on the flouring mill business in Ripley Township quite extensively for those times, and his brand of flour had an extensive sale. Bad luck, however, came to him and some years since he lost all his property. He had been an inmate of the farm only a few years. Previous to that time he resided with his daughters two of whom are living in the county - transcribed by kbz - thanks to Suzie B.

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DUNN, James A. (died here, not buried here)

Source: Crawfordsville, Indiana Daily News Review, July 26, 1900
James A. Dunn, aged 75 years, died this morning at the county asylum where he had been an inmate for six years. He leaves several children who are married and live at different places in the state. The burial takes place Friday at Masonic Cemetery. - transcribed by kbz

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McCLURE, Frank b. 5 October 1897 d. 12 May 1961

Although Frank McClure died at Westbrook Nursing Home on 5-12-1961, he had lived at the County Home prior to his death. The informant for his Death Certificate was Mrs. Pat Newlin, the Montgomery County Home Superintendent. Born, 10-5-1897 in Indiana, no parents are listed. He died of chronic bronchitis that had progressed into Advanced Emphysema. Dr. Richard R. Eggers signed the death certificate at 11:10 p.m. It is listed that he was buried 5-15-1961 in the Montgomery Co Home Cemetery. His Social Security lists his parents as James McClure and Mary Spore and his full name as James Franklin McClure born 5 October 1897 in Crawfordsville.

Source: WWI Draft card. Lives 1104 E. Main. Born 5 October 1897 Medium built; medium height brown hair; brown eyes. Nearest relative Mary McClure. Married Viola Maxwell 18 Sept 1919 at the age of 22. He is lised as a chaffeur in commercial trading living in Walnut Twp in the 1920 census with Viola. He is listed with a Mary M. McClure living on Tuttle Avenue in the 1940 census, age 42 - children Herbert G.9 ; James A 7; Joseph P 4 and Thomas 2.

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McNEELEY, Albert

b. Sep., 1870 d. Aug. 11, 1952

Father: William H. McNeeley and mother Phoebe Elya (Thompson) Albert worked on the Rail road as a carpenter and did odd jobs around and about. He was from a family of several boys, including Charles; Frank; and James. In 1940, he is listed as having an 8th grade education and lives at the poor farm with about 55 other "inmates" - residents. Seth and May Swank are the superintendents. He never married..

Source: Crawfordsville Journal, August 11, 1952 Albert McNeeley, lifelong resident of Montgomery county, died Sunday morning at the County Home on Whitlock Ave. He was 80 years old. Mr. McNeeley was the son of William H. and Elya McNeeley. During most of his like he was employed as an odd jobs man. A brother, Frank, preceded him in death several years ago. The only survivor is a cousin, A.E. McNeeley. Graveside services will be held at the cemetery near the County Home Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Friends may call at the Proffitt & Sons Funeral Home.

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NUNAN, Rebecca A.

b. 1853 d. 1931

99% sure this is Rebecca A. Morgan who married Patrick J. Nunan on 23 March 1915 at the age of 62. Her birth is listed as 11 Feb 1853. Nothing else found about her. Patrick Nunan was married prior to Rebecca and had two children, Lucy and Ora. He died 3 April 1927 and is buried in Calvary Cemetery. He was born in our county at Waynetown son of John and Kate O'Conner Nunan. His first wife was Lucy Vance whom he married 13 November 1879.

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STUMP, Daisy Maude

b. 23 April 1881 d.. Aug. 3, 1957

Daisy was never married and died of a cerebral hemorrhage with complications of hypertension and arterior sclerosis. She helped with the housekeeping at the poor farm and died there on August 3, 1957 after staying almost 30 years there. Mary Owens was her mother. ? Stump is on her death record. Her father was Welsey. She is listed repeatedly in the Crawfordsville City directories as "Montgomery County Home."

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WILLIAMS, Rita Mae 11743159 b. May 30, 1961 d. May 31, 1961

& her twin, WILLIAMS, Tina Mae 11743176 b. May 30, 1961 d. Jun. 1, 1961

 


Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Review Saturday, March 14, 1885

"PAUPER's PARADISE"

The Review lays before its readers this week in the article which follows, a thorough description of the workings of that costly institution known as the "Poor House." The present "County Farm," was purchased by the commissioners March 11, 1844 of Wm. Burbridge, paying for the same in two county orders of $500 each and assuming th epayment of a mortgage of $1,500 held by one Bronson of New York. A brick building was erected and Wm. Burbridge appointed superintendent. He was followed successively by James Wallace, James Hitch, Henry Bowen, Thomas Campbell, WR Lawson, Goerge Jones, Sr, George Jones, Jr and TJ Hole, the present incumbent. It was found that the old building wa snot large enough to accomodate the paupers of the county and on June 12, 1858 the commissioners contracted for the erection of the present building with Jas. K. Wallace for the brick word and Nathaniel Morgan the wood work. Hitch was the first superintendent of the new building. The present incumbent, Thomas J. Hole, took the robes of office in 1877 and on Monday was reemployed by the Board of Commissioniers for another term. The building is a large, square structure of red brick, two stories in height, divided in the center of both stories by a wide hallway, flanked on either side by rows of rooms, each containing two beds and several of them as many as three.

... lym standing on a hill far removed from any other building, with the stream of Rock River running just behind it and plenty of water in wells and cisterns on the farm should give rise to this smell in a question for those who understand its workings to explain. Because a man is unfortunate is no reason why he should live in an atmosephere which is death intself. A pleantiful coat of whitewash, a hundred pounds of soft soap and a few barrels of water would go a long way toward making the atmosphere purer, the inmates more presentable and the insects scarcer. This is merely a suggestion.

Perhaps not one in every 500 of the Review's readers ever visited an asylum of any kind, therefore they have no idea of the misery which can be found boxed up, as it were, in four brick walls. Aged people, who have seen better days, now thrown by inhuman relatives on the cold mercies of the world, beated about from pillar to post, until their forms are bent and decrepit, and gray hair falls in wild abandon about their wrinkled temples. Losing all in old age, unable to work, they abandon all hope, yet, still clinging to life with a tenacity remarkable, they seek the only open door - that of the county asylum, where they wait patiently for the end. For such there is no heart but contains pity. Others again are not deserving of pity; they can give no excuse for their present condition in life; they cannot tell to what they owe their condition. They accept the situation, never thinking or caring about the ouside world, suprememly happy with three meals of corn bread, black

The walls were, we suppose, originally white, but at this date bear but little resemblance to the drive snow. The walls do not look as if they had been introduced to soap and water for a long time if ever, great holes have been knocked in the plastering, laying bare the lathing and brick work. The bedsteads are all single and many of them would seem to be populated with things not human but which according to the theory of Evolution, may be one stage of human development. The population of the bedsteads may be much greater than our casual examination would indicate. It was a scratching subject to tackle, when the "mild blue eye" of the Superintendent was cast upon us in an entreating manner.

The beds are supplied with two sheets, two pillows and a cotton comfort so far as our examination went and the bed clothes did not appear to have been interviewed by the washer woman for some time. Several of the beds were occupied by aged paupers, who still retained their clothing, from dirty hat to muddy boots. In the male department which is upstairs, the dirt was more plentiful than below stairs, as all the male paupers smoke, and many of them chew tobacco. The total absence of cuspadoes leaves the floors of the hall and different rooms free for that purpose and from indications the day the Review visited the institution after a few days spitting on the part of the inmates, the American Navy could float in the upper story of the building.

When the Review visited the place there were 60 inmates ranging in age from 14 to 100 years; consumptives, paralytics, epileptics, old people, destitute people, silly people, crazy people, and several whose only disease is pure and unadultgerated cussedness, mixed with laziness and a warped and deformed mind which led tghem hellward, until disease, the natural result of a life of shame hads left them physical wrecks and subjects of public charity. The yard surrounding the building is as barren of grass as the top of Mount Blanc, and the atmosphere which rises from the place freighted as it is with the smell of pauperism, would seem to drive nature farther away with her leaves, her birds and her flowers, to gladden the eyes of more fortunate humanity. These people live year in and year out in an atmosphere loaded with stench, which makes on unused to it, feel as though a car wheel on his stomach would hardly suffice to keep that organ from turning a double summersault (sic) out of his mouth.

The atmosphere in the county jail is as the perfume of Araby and Blest compared to the noxious vapors which hang around the building in which is confined the paupers of Montgomery County. Those who are acaquainted with jails and their management, state that ours is the only one they ever examined which was destitute of that smell so peculiar to prisons. The air in the jail though it comes through grated windows an dinto stone corridors, is pure and sweet. Why the county asylum standing ona hill far removed from any other building, with the

Losing all in old age, unable to work, they abandon all hope, yet still, clinging to life with a tenacity remarkable, they seek the only open door - tha tof the county asylum, where they wait patiently for the end. For such there is no heart but contains pity; they can give no excuse for the present condition in life, cannot tell to what they owe their condition. They accept the situation, never thinking or caring about the outside world, supremely happy with three meals a day of corn bread, black coffee, boiled meat, potatoes and sometimes beans, and their associaitons with idiots and silly paupers are equal in their minds to that of kings and queens. They sleep among the insects as soundly as though on a downy bed, fanned by the spicy breezes which blow softly o'er Celon's isle." With dirty clothes and unkept hair, they gaze with supercilous stare on the intruder who seeks to explore the places where they live from year to year, making no effort to better their condition, their minds obscured by the mist of pauperism. The only news they hear of the outside world is brought to them by newcomers, and their only music the chatter of idiots and the wild laugh of maniacs; content to live off public chairty and sleep the everlasting sleep at life's dreary close, in the rough pine coffin of a pauper. God help such people, of no use to themselves or humanity in this world, to be something in the next.

There is still another class who are inmates, not from choice, but sheer necessity. The wolf of starvation drove them to the door of the public alms house. Too proud to beg, they take what is offered them by public charity and go their way, only biding their time to escape the tortures of staying in such a place, by finding work; anxious at any price to abandon the horrors of a living tomb, where vermin crawl through the crevices and the gaunt skeleton of want, stands with hungry and threatending look at their side.

Another class are the lunatics, persons of unsound mind; the wild maniac gibbering idiot - all incurable. Having at one time been inmates of the State institution for the insane and pronounced incurable have been returned to the County Asylum for safe keeping. This is the case which excites pity in the breasts of all. They must be cared for; humanity demands it; and it also demands that they shall receive the best of care; that they shall be kept clean and clothes warm and comfortable. The care of the insane could, we think, be improved upon at the County Asylum. A dungeon washed out clean and renovated daily would be preferable to 4 or 5 of these unfortunate people crowded together in a room a dozen feet square, containing besides, that many chairs, three beds, a couple of trunks and several boxes, and over all, the grimy ceiling, hung with festoons of cobwebs and the air rendolent with tobacco smoke and the smell of pauperism. Idiocy is a terribler thing viewed under any circumstances, but surrounded with all the paraphernalia of poverty it becomes terribly so. The descriptive pen of a Dumas or James cannot do the sight justice. It must be viewed to give any adequate idea of the horrors such a sight discloses.

We will now give our readers an account of each individual who occupies a seat in this abode of misery. We will begin with ...

Mrs. Jane COOK - Mrs. Cook is a rather comely old lady, 67 years of age. She has been an inmate of this institution for a period of three years. She has a story which she tells as follows. When her husband died she was living in Ohio. His estate when settled up left her a comfortable competence, enough to keep her independent during the remainder of her life. After her husband's death she made her home with her son: he in the goodness of his heart went security for a friend for a large amoung of money. The friend failed to meet his obligations and the son was compelled to sell everything at a sacrifice to meet the indebtedness and also sunk his mother's competence. Her other son, William Cook, resided in this county near Wesley, and was in good circumstances. She came to him expecting the treatment at his hands a mother should expect, from a son whose cradle had been rocked by her in infancy and whose childhish troubles had been soothed as only a mother can but she was doomed to disappointment, the son had forgotten the days of Auld Lang Syne. Though rich comparitively in this world's goods, he had no corner in his home for the mother who bore him, had no crust of bread to give to keep life in the bosom from which he was norished. Mother was no account now to him, her step was feeble and her voice tremulous with age, her locks white with the snows of many winters. The past was forgotten: the spark of fililal love was quenched in the bosom of William Cook. He ordered the wagon to the door, his mother was placed in it and she with her few poor belongings were deposited at the door of the County Asylum. Three years have passed away since then, and during that time not once has the cruel-hearted son seen the old mother, who is fast tottering to the grave through the foetid, poisonous air of the county poor house, although she has repeatedly sent for him. What wonder would it be, did not fiends, gtnomes, goblins and devils dance about the couch of William Cook, banishing sleep, and ghosts more horrible thatn that of the murdered Banquo confront him at every step. With a mother's confidence in her offspring she still awaits his coming, and should he never come, his mother's tongue will plead for the forgiveness of his sin when "time unveils eternity."

NOTE: the rest are in alphabetical order to find easier but Jane was left first since it started the tirade below :) -- kbz

John BARRIGAN - John is 34 years of age and has been an inmate 10 years. He is a sufferer from spinal disease which has drawn his back into the shape of a letter S and utterly incapacitated him for work. Having no friends, his only hope was the poor house, where he will end his days. He is employed as help in the dining room.

PATRICK BARRIGAN - Patrick's name would indicate his nationality. He is possessed of a kindly face and pleasant smile. He was sick the day the Review called on him, and was furnished a supply of double back-action cathartic pills by the county physician, which pills he received with a hearty, "God bless ye, sor." Though sick, Pat had been down to the barnlot and had his boots covered with mud and had gotten into bed just so, making a very bad looking set of bed clothes. His age is 66 and he has been an inmate five years.

Jimmy BEARD - is insane and a very bad man when angry. His age is 32 years and he has been an inmate of the asylum for 12 years. He is the most violent inmate of the house and safety compels him to be put in a dark dungeon about as often as his spells come on.

Ellen BIRCHFIELD - Ellen's case is one of destitution; she has two small children and could not procure food for them during the winter in the city , and moved to the Paupers Paradise to await the arrival of "Gentle Annie." She and her children have been inmates for about five months. She will, she says, go to work as soon as she can find work to do and the cold can be borne with impunity.

Steve BLUE -- Steve is the only colored pauper the county has, which fact speaks well for the colored people of the county. This one is a maniac. He has been confined in the Insane asylum, pronounced incurable and sent back to end his days at the county poor house. He is 43 years old and has been an inmate for two years. He is very quiet as a general rule, but takes those spells when it requires the combined strength of a half dozen men to control and chain him to the floor. - Note: in the 1880 census, 119 Wabash Avenue, he is married to Harriet (both age 33) and they have three daughters, Eva (13); Sarah (11) and Martha (9)

Manda BOWERS -- Manda was on the invalid list when the Review visited the insitution. She is a very large woman and looks as stout as an ox. Superintendent Hole says Manda is a good worker when well, and always ready to do her part. Her age is 41 and she has been an inmate for 20 years. Her mind is weak making her of the silly order; her eyes have a blank expressioni which show to the most casual server the shattered state of her mental faculties.

JOHN BOYD -- John is of Irish descent and can talk a tobacco Indian to death in five hours if exposed to the storm. He wears a thin frill of fiery red hair extending from ear to ear under his chin, a mustach of a weather beaten color and a very red face. He is an inveterate smoker and uses a pipe very powerful for perfume. He was very anxious to be interviewd on almost any subject except his past history which would have no doubt been very interesting, but which all seemed a blank to him. He is afflicted with fits and his mind is trembling in the balance. His age is 44 years and he has been an inmate for 16 years. During his worst attacks he has to be chained to the floor.

Edward BRANDKAMP -- this man is noted as the finest silversmith in the state an expert at watch making and engraving. He is cursed with a terrible appetite for strong drink, which has completely wrecked him physically and mentally, both hand and brain having lost their cunning. He is 66 years old and has been an inmate 11 years. It is a sad sight to see aman, once honored and respected among his fellows, blessed with an interesting family and in a position to enjoy life, fall from that high position to the level of a brute and enter the county poor house, friendless at last, and homeless and in the end, "Will sink into his grave, Unwept, unhonored and unsung." Edward Brandkamp with his wrecked faculties and palsied limbs is a temperance lecture more powerful than the most vicid word painted could utter.

Wm. BUTLER - is of Irish extraction and is crippled, having one foot off. He is very old and being crippled, incocitates (?) him from work. He is jolly and ready to crack a joke at all times. He tries to be cleanly in his habits and succeeds as well as the circumstances will allow. His age is 78 and he has been an inmate 22 years. He can chew tobacco equal to the best on earth. Source: Crawfordsville Star, Feb 4, 1886 p 5 - "Billie Butler died at the poor farm Saturday evening, his remains were interred in the Catholic Grave Yard."

Oliver CAREY - Here is a subject as completely buried as though the grave had opened and swallowed him. 12 years ago he was captured running wild in the woods near Linden, stark naked and fleet as a deer. His capture was only effected after a long pursuit and considerable strategy. He fought like a wild beast at bay. Finally his captors got him securely bound and to rid themselves of him he was brought to the poor house and confined in a cell about 10' square of solid brick walls. The only light which penetrates the cell coming through a small closely grated window about 12' from the floor. He is totally devoid of clothing and wallowing in filth. A Most horrible sight to see - he gets wild occasionally and dashes himself against the walls of his prison house, like a caged lion, goaded with a red hot iron, making it dangerous for an unarmed man to enter his cage. His name is unknown as also is where he came from, he not being able to utter an intelligible word. His identity is completely lost and when death relieves him from his tortures no one will give a sigh or shed a tear.

Andy CONNELLY - Andy is what would pass anywhere as a "foine old Irish gintleman." cleanly in his habits, his face smoothly shaven and his hair combed sleek. He sat in his room reading the news. He is worn out physically and broken down in health. He looks like a man to whom life is such a place would be torture. His age is 74, and he has been an inmate of the institution two years. Andy in his better days was an excellent gardener, was formerly gardener for Col. WC Willson. He is a man of very high character and unquestioned integrity and a devout Catholic.

Wm. CONNOLLY - William is of Irish extraction, aged 65 years and has been an inmate 12 years. He has a crippled hand and is further afflicted with what he is pleased to call a "divil of a bad cat tar sor."

Susan COX is an elderly lady, looks much older than she says she is, 45 and can beat the phonograph in its palmiest day at talking, even when that instrument is worked by steam. She is not a constant occupant of the county house, going out in summer to work. She says her husband died several years ago and left her without anything to live on. She then in order to keep her children together, came to the poor house - God help such judgment on the part of a mother! She had three children when she entered the portals of this place and homes have lately been found for two of them. The other, a girl named Anna, aged about 14 is still there. She is rather good looking lass but is afflicted with weak eyes.

Tom CUNNINGHAM - this man's case is one of the sad ones. He is now 74 years old and for 13 years his eyes have been sealed. He is a native of Ireland and has not a friend in the New World. He is a man of considerable education and talks intelligently on any subject. He is clean in his habits and his face bears a pleasnat smile. He spoke feelingly of the great calamity which had overtaken him and the sightless eyes filled with tears. The man who cannot find pity in his heart for the poor creature whose eys are gone, is indeed a hardened wretch.

Rosa DOUGHERTY - Rosa is 22 years of age, and is afflicted with St. Vitus' dance she has been an inmate of the institution for 11 weeks. She is a rather comely looking lass and was dressed in a more becoming and neater style than any inmate of the institution. She was engaged in sewing.

Mary DUKE -- Mary is 24 years old and is insane. She sits on a chair week after week picking idly at her clothing or bending her fingers backward until they lay flat on the back of her hand. She has been at the insutition for ofur years. This is the second time she has been an inmate she was removed to the Insane Asylum at one time, pronounced incurable and sent back. She is very filthy in her habits and for this reason her hair is clipped close to her head and clothing kept on her. She is one of the most pitiable objects to be seen at the institution.

Alfred EBRITE -- This man is a victim of epilepsy. He has periodical attacks of this malady and becomes furiously insane, it taking often the combined efforst of the force employed about the building to chain him down. He has not the appearance of one of low birth. His head is well shaped and his intellect has been almost entirely shattered by the terrible disease, but it can still be seen what the man once was. His head bears numerous bruises and cuts, the result of his severe falls on the floor and against objects. He informed the Review that he had eaten no breakfast that morning and was momentarily expected an attack of his malady. He is 59 years of age, has iron grey hair and has been an inmate for 8 years. He is the son of Col. Ebrite, one of the first settlers of Montgomery County, a man of wealth and influence. Alfred was considered a man of much promise in his youth. He had secured a good education, far above the average, had taught school very successfully, and been a student of medicine. This disease had preyed upon his mind continually, from the time of his first affliction and it was the purpose of finding a cure that he studied medicine. He failed to find it. He was a man liked by everyone and his condition is sorely regretted by all who knew him. His family was forced to take him to the asylum because of his violent paroxsyms when attacked by the malady, which will only be cured by the eternal sleep of death.

Charley EDWARDS was well known over this city a few years ago as a silly boy. As he grew older his mind became still more of a blank until he was considered an idiot. He has been at the poor house 9 years, and is 38 years old. He moves around staring quizically at every object, and offering harm to nothing. He is an object of pity.

Elizabeth ENDICOTT - This woman is a truly pitiable sight. She cannot utter an intelligible word now, nor has she for many years. Her age is not known but she has been an inmate two years. Her hair is clipped close and she sits in a chair muttering an unintelligble language. She is an object to excite pity; her face the hue of a new sad

Jacob FAY - this man has been an inmate 6 months and is aged 64 years. Not much of his history is known or can be procured as he is of a taciturn nature. He is badly ruptured; his nationality is German.

Joseph FRITZ - is a paralytic he don't seem to be very badly off and was probably born tired along with the paralysis. He is 66 years old of German descent and has been an inmate one year.

Sam GERBRICK is 21 years of age and is a wild, screaming maniac. His yells can be heard ... (whoops missed that - sorry)

Lucinda GREEN - is another woman whose baser passions have brought her low. No prepossessing in appearance, her body is racked in every joint by pain, the result of her own folly. She is 32 years old and has been an inmate since October last.

Pat HAYS - Pat is 65 years of age and did not seem to enjoy answering questions. He said he had been an inmate about six months. "What is the matter with you Pat" Faith sor, and oi was out of fix when I came here sor, but O'm getting better now and Oil soon be ready to lave this place, thanks be to God, sor. "I hope so, Pat." God bliss ye sor and so do Oi, sor."

Cynthia HINES - Cynthia is about 20 years old and is weak minded. She has been raised at the asylum from a child. She is not dangerous and is employed in the ktichen as help. Her shock of coal black hair standing on end like that of the sides hot Circassian and skin the color of a well worn drum head, with a pair of coal black eyes, minus expression, give her a wild and uncanny appearance.

Dudley HINES - this man is 26 years of age and is in almost the last stages of consumption. He can sit up and walk about some, but the terrible cough tells his story. He has been an inmate 8 years.

John HOFFMAN - If the visitor gets close to this individual, he will need all the weight possible to hold his stomach in position, and will think of the horrible object with feelings of disgust and loathing for weeks. "Old Dutchy" as he is called, is an idiot of the most horrible kind of low stature, shriveled face, leering eye and everything else going to make a terrible object, seemingly forsaken by God and abandoned by his fellow men. Into the wrinkles on his face and neck old John had rubbed old all kinds of filth and over his clothes until the stench which arose from him would have driven ten penny nails out of sight into hard oak, "metaphorically speaking" and this object hearing but little resemblance to the human family with his filth and dirt is allowed to circulate among the other inmates scattering his horrible smell all over the house. If he was placed somewhere, where the hose could be turned on him daily, he could be kept in a more presentable shape. Such people should be taken care of and there should be some way provided for keeping them clean or for keeping them from public view. The suit of clothes worn by this man the Superintendent informed us had been put on him two days before we visited the establishment and it then looked as though it had been trampled underfoot by a herd of mules in a stable for the same period old John had wor eit. Cleanliness and pure water will hurt no one and a vast deal more of it would undoubtedly improve the effuvia which rises as a fog from old John. John is 70 years old and has been a county charge for 20 years. In addition to being an idiot he is badly ruptured.

Patrick JEFFRIES is a native of Ireland, 84 years of age and an inmate of this institution for 12 years. His only trouble is old age, the infirmities of which have incapacitated him from work and homeless and friendless, a stranger in a strange land, he sought protection at the only open door.

Mary LAFFERTY - this woman is 42 years of age has been afflicted with epilepsy all her life. She has entirely lost the power of speech, being only able to utter an unintelligible jargon. She was poorly clothed in an old calico gown, her face the color of a smoked ham, hair in a tangle. She was the picture of utter misery and has been an inmate of the asylum for 22 years.

Louisa LAMBERT is a woman 60 years old; stout looking but in ill health. She finds the poor house a home when out of work and comes and goes as it is convenient. She has resided there constantly for five months. She was engaged in sewing on a quilt.

Michael MANNIE is an Irishman and has lived at the institution for 20 years. He came there in 1865 with a badly broken leg and from that day to this has never walked. The leg was set but the wound produced running sores which have spread from foot to thigh, making it a horrible sight to look at. He will not allow amputation and swears like a trooper when the operations is mentioned. He is now 80 years old and Father TIme, with his scythe, will soon sweep him from the scene of his sufferings, into we hope a more joyful clime.

Mike MCCAULIFFE - Mike is another unfortunate man who has been confined to his bed for a period of 7 years, ever since he has been an inmate of the institution. He was brought there with a broken leg and is now afflicted with terrible sores. He is 70 years of age.

Joseph McCULLOUGH -- Joseph is 61 years of age and is too well known about town to need any extended notice from us. He is a paralytic and can only hobble about by the aid of a cane while one arm is held in place by a sling. He has been an inmate for about six years.

Jack McGRIFFLE - Jack has been an inmate of the institution for 10 years, for the greater portion o fhis time, he is afflicted with weak eyes not being able to see objects with any degree of distinctness. His age is 45 years.

Richard MILLER- Richard does not make the poor house his permanent abode but comes and goes when he pleases. He is aged and broken down physically. He says he is 70 years old and has been in the institution for 3 years.

Jimmy MOORE - is of German lineage, and is now 82 years old. He has been an inmate of this institution since 1876. He is infirm but he is a victim of "spells" as epilepsy and other fits are known at the institution and the dungeon and chains are not strangers to him when attacked by these periodical spells.

Larry MURPHY - Larry is of Irish blood, aged 66 and has been an inmate 18 years. Larry claims that old age has broken him down and that he has weak eyes. About weak eyes Larry is correct about but there seems to be something constitutional in his case. He looks tired. We would not for the world cast any reflections on Larry, but he has a tired look.

ORPHA PETERSON - Orpha is 24 years old. His history is unknown. He has been an inmate 4 years and is weak minded and very quiet, he would never be seen were he not pointed out.

B.F. PICKARD - This man has chronic bronchitis, with a strong tendency to consumption. He is by all odds the the finest looking man at the asylum. His forehead is broad and high, while his face is covered by a magnificent auburn beard, reaching almost to his waist. He is stretched upon a poor cot, gradually coughing his life away. He told the physician that he was utterly heart sick and discouraged, fretting under the forced acceptance of public charity. He is 57 years old and has been an inmate six months.

Polly (Ann) Porter - is one of the bad ones; she is a maniac of the worst description and then one of her "spells" comes on she makes things hustle. She is what might be called a jibbering idiot - tame enough on some occasions but when her anger is up, "look out." She was chained to the floor but would not show the chain to the newspaper man, nor would she tell him why she was compelled to wear it. "Won't do, won't do," she screamed with a wild shake of her head and a laugh that would frighten a timid person. She is kept chained about all the time. Her age is 37 and she has been an inmate 9 years. -- her obituary thanks to Kim H -- Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 25 August 1893 Polly Porter, an inmate of the county asylum, died Wednesday, aged about 50 years.. She was received from Clark township about 25 years ago. Nothing is known of her history, and being feeble minded she could give no intelligent account of her parentage. -

Mary PRINDLE - Mary is an aged Irish woman as nearly dried up as it is possible for a human being to be and still live; she is 78 years old and has been an inmate for 9 years. A conversation with her proved a failure as she talked so broken and so fast, it was impossible to understand her. Aunt Mary has a partiality or cathartic pills and demands a supply of the county physician at every visit. It takes a good handful to run her a week.

Susie RECKARD - Aunt Susie as she is called by all about the farm, claims the honor - if such a thing can be so named - of being the first pauper Montgomery County ever produced. She is a rather large woman, considerably deaf and has a voice in pitch not unlike the sound produced by drawing a file across the teeth of a cross cut saw, very sharp and shrill and not trembling. She informed the Review with much pride that she "came with her family to the house from the old asylum," and had been with every boss who had reigned there. Her "family" evidently didn't see as she did as they are not to be found on the roster and left Susie as their representative. The records of the insitution show her age to be over 100. Lest the reputation of the Review for truth and veracity should be called into question we will state that SUsie Reckard now in our county poor house is 100 years old and let the odd years go for better of worse, and call Susie an inmate for 41 years. It would take a pen with more vigor than ours to describe the horrors of 41 years in a poor house.

Polly SAMSON - Everybody who has resided in Crawfordsville for any length of time knows "Aunt Pop" Samson and many will remember the lively tongue lashings she gave them when younger, when they attempted to "guy" her on the streets. Aunt Polly is just a little bit "queer," and declares emphatically that she has not a friend one arth. She seems to enjoy herslef well at the asylum and her shrill voice and laugh chills a man to his marrow bones, while she gazes at him through her "specks" with a loony leer. She is 77 years old and has been an inmat three years going and coming when she pleases.

John SMITH - is also a native of the "ould sod." His age is 60. When asked how long he has been an inmate, looked up from his paper, peered through his spectacles, and with a comical grin, replied "Blessed it oi know, maybe the boss can tell as much as I can." Down went his head and he commenced reading again. He has been an inmate 3 years. His ailment is a club foot.

Martha SMITH -- Martha is one of the women known to the world as "scarlet," a sad spectacle of human depravity. She is 27 years old, and has been an inmate for nine years. During that time she has occupied a bed for five years, paralyzed from the waist down, and her arms and shoulders contorted into fearful shapes from the savages of the disease which fills every vein and artery of her body. Lying on a squallid bed, her face the hue of saffront, her breast naked except a miserable woolen rag drawn across and complaining of pain in every muscle - it was indeed a sight to cause one to shudder. Looking at this woman paying the penalty of her sin, suggested the propriety of more missionary work at home and the expendture of less labor endeavoring to convert the heathen of the Riji Island. We have them among us. "Self preservation is the first law of nature" is a well worn adage, but contains much of truth. Purify society at home, which makes possible such repulsive objects as poor Martha Smith. A few thousand dollars expended in establishing homes for friendless women will reflect more glory from the pages of the Record Book on high, than all the years of labor and millions of treasure expended in penetrating with the Gospel in one hand and the Sword of Avarice in the other, into the heart of the Dark Continent.

John STEWARD - is a German and his conversation not intelligible in all its parts to one not acqauainted with the varnacular of Bismarck's government. He is 72 years old and has been an inmate 5 years. His only troubles are old age and physical weakness.

George VanSLYKE - Everybody knows George and therefore he needs no extended notice here. George is not a subject of which it is pleasant to write and the least said, the soonest mended, so we will drop it. He has been confined in his little dark cell for 28 years.

Lucy WILSON - Lucy has a most forbidding aspect. Her jaws are large and asquare; she has pale blue eyes, a low forehead a very red face, covered over with a growth of beard about half an inch long, which gives her an uncanny appearance, reminding one of the weird sisters Macbeth met in the lonely forest. We looked to see the dance and heard the song, "Black spirits and white, Blue spirits and gray; Mingle, mingle, mingle, Ye who mongle may." It looks creuel to the write of unforunate Lucy Wilson, yet the thought would come, try as one might to suppress it. She is 46, has epileptic fits which have weakened her mind very materially. SHe has been an inmate 3 years.

We have endeavored to give as briefly as possible a clear and truthful statement of our County Asylum and its inmates. If we have failed it is because our pen has not been able to do justice to the scenes at that home of misery and woe. Our story is brief to be consigned to the columns of a newspaper, yet we hope our readers can draw some idea of what can there be seen. The crust of bread and cup of pure cold water, partaken of under the clear sky and in the pure air of heaven, is infinitely preferable to the finest viands of earth prepared by Delmonico and washed down with costly wines, eaten inside four prison walls surrounded by the feted smell of dirt and poverty.

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Source: Crawfordsville Review, Crawfordsville, Montgomery County, Indiana 26 June 1858 p 3

Expense of Poor $1,953.89
County Asylum $825.38
Law Suits of Poor Persons $105.00
Superintendent of County Asylum $600.00
Insane Persons $963.90
Deaf & Dumb Persons $19.65

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal 19 April 1860 Edition 02

Strange Affair in a Poor House--Rats Devouring One of the Inmates. Truth is stranger than fiction 'We have the following facts from.an authentic source: There has been an inmate of the poor house of this county ever since its establishment, an old man by the name of McCarthy. He has had a fever sore on his left ankle, which has made him a cripple, although with the aid of crutches he has been able to hobble about. For the last three years he has occupied a kind of out house, solitary and alone." He was hardly ever known to leave his quarters, except to get his meals, when he would hobble over to the Poor House proper, and his meals would be handed to him, and he would return, and nothing more would be heard of him until he got hungry, when he would again appear at the gate with his plate, exchange it for one containing what was prepared for or allowed him. This has been ,his habit until recently, being too feeble to get out, his meals were taken to him. On Monday morning last, when his breakfast was taken to him, the discovery was made that the rats had eaten the flesh off one of his, feet, leaving it a perfect skeleton as high as the ankle joint. He was removed to the larger building and given more comfortable quarters and on Tuesday Dr. Mead, the county physician, amputated the leg just below the knee. When removed. McCarthy was found to be very feeble, and the doctor thought by amputating the limb his life might be saved, but it is very doubtful whether he can survive long. It was his right, foot that was eaten by the rats. the fever sore was on the left leg near the ankle. That the rats are up, McCarthy's foot there can be no doubt, and that he would have been literally carried out at the rat holes, there is little doubt. He had been removed only a few minutes when at least a dozen rats were seen on his bed. That the old man should have been neglected in the manner detailed to us is unaccountable. We hope for the honor of the Superintendent and the keeper some better excuse can be given for neglecting a human being in this manner, than any we have yet heard. We give the matter as it was detailed to us, and have every reason to believe the details above to be true.- thanks to Kim H - if ANYONE knows who this man might be, do let us know - thanks so much

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MARY DAVIS

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 6 March 1873

Mary Davis, an old lady and an in mate of the county asylum, fell last Friday and broke her right aim and received other injuries. It is thought she will not recover. - thanks, Kim H

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1872 Year End Report - thanks to Kim H

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 21 March 1872

From the report of Dr. W. L. Johnson, County Physician, for the year ending March 1, 1872, we get the following concerning the county asylum: Total enrollment, 57; remaining, 25; average. 25 of the 25 remaining, 7 are idiots, 4 imbeciles, 1 maniac, 1 paralyzed, 3 3 lame, 3 old age, 2 children, and a deaf and dumb family. There have been two births this year. Three boys have been bound to farmers. The deaths have numbered five, four of are reaping a rich harvest. consumption and one of apoplexy. No case of fever of a malignant, contagious or typhoid type has appeared. The Asylum has been kept in fair condition, and with economy.

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LOVENA IVRY

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 8 February 1872

Lovena Ivry, an inmate of the' county asylum, died on Wednesday night of last week, of hemorrhage of the lungs. Samuel Mount, also an inmate of the asylum, died of consumption last Monday. This is the fourth death from consumption within thirty days. The general health at the asylum is reported by Dr. Johnson to be very good - thanks, Kim H for this one

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, Crawfordsville 11 May 1900 p 12

The report of the Board of State Charities contains a description of the Montgomery County poor asylum made as the result of an inspection made in May, 1899. A new cell house is about to be built to take the place of the one criticized. The report says: “The farm consisting of 180 acres, is located one and one-half miles northeast of Crawfordsville. The superintendent receives a salary and furnishes teams, two wagons and harness. Everything else is supplied by the commissioners. The land is good. Most of it is tillable. There are five cattle, nine cows and 90 head of hogs that belong to the farm. There is a small garden and a young orchard of 75 trees. The population is 52 – 37 men, 14 women and one child. There are four insane men, whom it is necessary to keep locked in rooms. The sexes are partially separated and it is necessary to exercise the utmost care and watchfulness to make this separation effective. The house and inmates are of variable cleanliness. Bath tubs are provided and bathing is said to be required once a week. The clothing is ample. Iron beds are supplied upon which are straw ticks and sufficient covering. The main building is an old brick, metal-roofed structure, with an addition built about 11 years ago. These buildings are in fair condition. Some repairs are needed. There is an old building not far distant, known as the cellhouse, which is very dirty, dingy and unsanitary. The odor is bad, and there is a lack of proper plumbing and sewerage arrangements. In the main building there are three cells adjoining the kitchen in each of which is kept an insane person. These are said to become very foul in warm weather. The building is lighted by lamps and heated by steam. The food is sufficient. The vegetables and fruit grown are not nearly enough to supply the needs. It would pay to grow a very much larger garden and to have a considerable area of small fruit. The inmates are in fair health. Some papers and magazines are provided for reading but there are no religious services. The records are in very good shape. In addition to the ordinary repairs needed throughout the building, it should be painted inside and out and on the roof. Supt. Myers vigorously protests that Mr. Butler’s criticisms are unjust, especially as to the old cell house. As the addition to be built this season, however, will remove the objectionable features, there is no need of controversy. - kbz

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WILLIAM O'MARA

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 4 August 1888

A few days since Wm. O'Mara, an inmate of the State Insane Asylum, died. He was adjudged insane and sent to the institution from this county, and hence when his death occurred the* corpse was returned here for burial. It came in a rough hospital coffin, and horrible to relate had been dumped rudely Into the box perfectly nude. The man undoubtedly had clothing when he was sent to the institution, or if he had not the county of Montgomery would have furnished it on application. This Incident speaks volumes for the management of the Insane Asylum and the tender care exorcised by those in charge, and the economic administration of affairs at that institution. These tendered hearted authorities supposed probably that poor Bill O'Mara was "only a pauper whom nobody owned," and any way to get his body off of their hands would answer. Montgomery county takes cane of her citizens and on the arrival here of the remains they were examined and interred an humanity dicated. This dumping of the unfortunate dead, who have to be cared for at public expense is on par with the charges made by the committee and proven. Out with such places and place the care of the insane of the State in the hand* of those whose sense of justice and instincts of humanity have not become paralyzed. Such things as these demand an investigation, and while there is no law to punish those who commit the act, there is a way to rid the State of their services. "Turn the rascals out." - so sad - thanks Kim H for this one

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JOHN HUFF

Source: Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 2 March 1889

You that are always complaining of your share of this world's fate should have seen poor John Huff who died at the poor farm, Monday at the advanced age of 75. After battling with a cruel world and seeing the bright sunshine of a happy and prosperous career he succumbed to the dealings or a mysterious power and throwing off all vestige of pride entered the paupers' home. He welcomed death and the remains were laid to rest in the county grave yard, a pauper without a friend to regret his death. - thanks to Kim H for this sad one :(

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Lunacy thick with Poor Farmers (my title :) kbz

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 13 February 1892

Our Colony in the Asylum Montgomery county is only allowed twenty representatives in the lunatic asylum at Indianapolis and the authorities here have been notified by the asylum management that there are already 35 there and more are arriving by almost every train. The Asylum people are preparing to call a halt. They say that every Montgomery county man who is a little queer or who gets in the way of some one else is unceremoniously arrested and shipped over to the asylum.

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SUSAN RECORD

Source: Crawfordsville Review February 15, 1890

The Oldest Pauper, Susan Record, the oldest pauper at the poor farm and an inmate longer, perhaps, of such an institution than any other in the state, died on Monday afternoon. The record of inmates show that she entered the county asylum in the year 1840 at age 60 years of age. This would figure her residence there at 50 years and her age 110 years. This last is not believed to be correct and her age is thought to be about 85 years. Her husband, many years ago, committed suicide on account of some crime charged against him, and her children, some three or four in number, she had not seen for along time before her death. The cost of board for the old woman was probably $200 per year. This for fifty years would make the sum of $10,000 that Montgomery county has paid for her maintenance.- thanks so very much to Kim H - what they're worried about is the money :(

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JACOB STEIN - buried - removed

Source: Crawfordsville Review November 12, 1898 Filled a Pauper's Grave.

The man found dead in a car on the Monon road last week was buried on Saturday evening in the cemetery attached to the poor asylum, no word having been received from relatives or friends—if he had any. From word received from Chicago it was learned that the deceased had followed the occupation of a peddler, had been in poor health and was about 28 years of age. --

Source: Crawfordsville Review November 1898 Body Disinterred. The body of Jacob Stein, the tramp who committed suicide here last week by banging himself in a Monon box car, has been disinterred and shipped to Chicago. The disinterment was at the instance of the United Hebrew Charities of Chicago who having heard of the suicide and thinking the victim might be a member of their race, sent a representative here Wednesday to investigate. When the body was taken up it was proven to belong to that nationality and was consequently taken to Chicago for re-burial. While Stein was unknown to this society it is a part of their religion to see that no Hebrew is buried in a pauper's grave!

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SANDLIN

Source: Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 18 April 1891

A pauper named Sandlin, aged 48 years, died at the poor asylum yesterday.

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THOMAS GETTY & JAMES HAM

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 23 May 1874

Two deaths have occurred at the poor farm since our last issue. .James Ham, an old inmate died of epilepsy last Saturday night, and Thomas Getty, who has been an inmate but a short time, died of cerebritis last Tuesday night. - transcribed by Kim H

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JAMES McCAW

Source: Crawfordsville Star, Dec 18, 1879 p 1

In the week opening Dec 8, 30 families received aid of Trustee (Joseph) Grubb. Only 3 of these were colored families, and they were afflicted in such a way as to be unable to work. There is not a colored person at the poor farm. Mr. Grubb manages to find work for every idle and able-bodied man who applies to him for aid. The average vagrant never applies twice, and don't hunt up the work either - transcribed by kbz

Here is another Poor Farm fellow - they are so hard to find, most not even in death records, or any cemetery mentions although the Poor Farm cemetery has been indexed. James McCaw

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Source::: Crawfordsville Star, Dec 15, 1881 p 1

WILLIAM SEYMOUR, a colored porter of the St. James, while frolicking around last week, suffered a compound fracture of the leg. On Monday he was taken to the poor farm.

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ROBERT CARSON

Source: Crawfordsville Star, Feb 2, 1882 p 3

Robert Carson, an old house painter well known about the city, died at the Poor Farm on last Saturday. He has relative sin the vicinity of the Junction living in fair circumstances.

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MARGARET PRINDABLE (I think this is Margaret Prindle above but can not find what happened to her)

Note: I added this to the GenWeb because ... the poor house people are so hard to find. I have found 6 in the last few months alone that died or likely died there and nothing else notes such

======================

Source: Union Twp 1880 Census "Poor House" #151 Margaret Prindable age 60 b. Ireland Old Age

ALEXANDER WESTFALL

Source: Weekly Argus News June 3, 1899 p 3 - Alexander Westfall, age 61 years, died this morning at the county farm having been an inmate there for several years. The remains were taken to Waynetown for interment.

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GROVER CLEVELAND HIBBS born

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 21 July 1888

A late addition to the inmates arrived a few days since, an unfortunate girl named Hibbs. giving birth to a child She has been an inmate of the institution for about four months, originally coming from the neighborhood of Whitesville. She seems not to consider the trouble she has on hand, being in a good humor and very chipper Being a boy, she has named the child Grover Cleveland Hibbs. - transcribed by Kim H

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GEORGE VanSLYKE

Source: Crawfordsville Review,Crawfordsville, 7 December 1889

There died on Monday evening at the county asylum an individual, George VanSlyke, who from his long sojourn at that institution, and the condition of his mind, had acquired considerable notoriety In local annals. From the records of the asylum it is shown that he was taken there in the fall of 1860, almost thirty years ago, and has been an inmate ever since. He became insane when a young man, and was soon after taken to the insane hospital at Indianapolis for treatment, but after a season was returned as incurable. He was for a time placed In the county jail under charge of Sheriff Schooler, but becoming very troublesome and dangerous was taken to the poor farm, where he has ever since remained. His insanity was of a violent form, and be was most of the time uncontrollable. He would tear into rags the strongest clothing that could be made for him, and lay In his cell, day and night, in an entirely nude condition. His bed generally was a long square box or frame work filled with straw. He would lay for hour after hour, year in and out, seeming to recognize nothing nor any body. There was, however, one of the employees of the asylum, who seemed to be able to control him, and at bis word quite often he would awaken from the deep reverie that appeared to enshroud him and assuming a half erect position, would put out bis band for bread, tobacco, or any thing that seemed to strike bis fancy. He was one of the most troublesome inmates that has ever been in the poor asylum, and now that death has taken him, a feeling of relief, will, no doubt, be felt by the Superintendent and his assistants. Thirty years of nothingness, of neither joy, sorrow, pleasure nor pain, but a life as not baring been lived! Truly the lives of many are blank, and what strange Incomprehensible thoughts and fancies must have passed through the mind of this poor unfortunate within that period of time. His age was about 53 years. His father and mother are both dead, but a brother, W. H. VanSlyke, resides here, and carries on the business of shoe making in the Joel block. The funeral with few attendees and fewer mourners occurred on Tuesday afternoon. - transcribed by Kim H

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HARRY SMITH

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 6 September 1890

It cost the county $311 to take care of Harry Smith who shoot himself about a month ago, and died at the county asylum Monday. - thanks to Kim H for finding this - sad

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JOSEPH PIERCE

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 22 September 1893

The burial of Jos. B. Pierce, who died at the county asylum, Monday morning, was held at the Thompson grave yard, near Yountsville, Wednesday morning. His wife is buried here. He has two daughters living in California, and some other relatives living in this State. - thanks so very much to Kim H for all her obit finding/transcribing

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WILLIAM EDWARD BRANDCAMP

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 18 October 1895

E. Brandkamp, an inmate of the poor farm, met with a serious accident Wednesday. He was on his way to the farm, along the Monon railroad, and fell through a cattle guard, breaking his leg at the thigh. As he is an old man the injury will prove a very serious, and perhaps, a fatal one. - transcribed by KH

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Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 27 January 1899

A Phase of Proposed Legislation. To the Editor of the Journal The new township bill as proposed has a clause concerning the poor which is not generally known to be in it. It is in the middle of section 4, and is to the effect that a person who has frequently received aid from the township for two years shall not thereafter receive any more aid unless he goes to the poor farm. Thus, if a widow with three children, who is now receiving aid in groceries, rent, fuel, etc., to the amount of $12 per month from the township, and has been for two years, and with this aid has managed to keep her family together, shall be cut off from such aid, and if she can't get along, then she must be sent to the poor house, and the children to the Orphans' Home. The expense to keep this family this way will be $150 per week for the woman, or $6 per month: and 25 cents per day for each of the three children at the Orphans' Home, which would amount to $5.25 per week for the three children, or $21 per month. Thus it will be seen that it would cost $27 per month to separate the family and keep the woman at the poor house and the three children at the Orphans' Home, instead of the $12 per month as now given by the township. This part of the measure is upon the theory that some persons if refused aid would get along in some manner to keep from going'to the poor house. This will be true, still there are many instances where there are widows with from three to six .children, who could not hold her little ones together under any circumstances, and the separation as demanded by the bill would cost over twice the sum to the taxpayers as it does now. The .only thing in the favor of such a change in regard to the cost, would be that their county would bear the expense incurred in separating the family, while the township alone pays it now. A township trustee has said that he favors the law for many cases, but that the separation of a widowed mother from her children and the breaking of family ties is a serious matter to contemplate and much more so to do. To judge this matter in the right light a man should look at his own family, and think if he was dead his wife and children shall be forced to separate because the wife is unable to earn enough money to keep the wolf from the door. The trustees will be forced by the bill to refuse aid to all who have been aided frequently during the past two years, and the big majority of those now aided in Union township would be cut off entirely when the law goes into effect, and if they could not get along, as many of them could not, then the grown persons must go to the poor farm and their children to the Orphans' Home. There will be no other way to do, unless the trustee shall pay for the aid out of his own pocket. The new bill makes no exceptions whatever, but says that the trustee shall report to the township board the names of the persons as have habitually received public aid and "if it shall appear from such report that any person has required such aid at frequent intervals in two or more consecutive years, such person shall be regarded as of the permanent poor of the township, to be aided only in the county asylum, and no township levy shall be made for the aid of such person by the trustee." The trustees will be obliged by law to enforce this provision, without any exceptions, circumstances or conditions whatsoever, and all persons who have now been receiving aid "frequently" for two years had better begin to prepare for the coming change, and the county commissioners prepare for an increase at the county asylum and Orphans' Home - transcribed by Kim H

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NANCY TRENTOR

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 11 September 1896

Mrs. Samuel Trentor, an inmate of the county poor asylum, has gone to Waynetown to visit her children, John Trentor and Mrs. Hannah Dermitt. Mrs. Trentor is 85 years of age and has lived in Montgomery county over 50 years, but her trip to Waynetown is the first she has ever made on the cars. She has been an inmate of the county asylum about two or three years, her husband dying there. - thanks Kim H

Note: Assume this is the wife of Samuel Trentor in 1880 Wayne Twp Montgomery County Census Samuel Trentor 75 - retired farmer can't read/write VA VA VA Nancy 70 can't read/write VA VA VA James M. 40 son Farmer IN VA VA Thomas N. 31 son same John A. 11 grandson works on farm IN IN IN They are found in the 1870 there but in 1850 Benton Co Indiana I do not see a death record for her or her husband sadly :( - kbz

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ROBERT CARPENTER

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 7 May 1897

Robert Carpenter, aged 75 years, died Sunday morning at the poor farm and was buried in the afternoon. he was a native of Kentucky and had been an inmate of the poor house off and on since 1885. He formerly worked on a farm near Brown's Valley. - transcribed by KH

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ROBERT COLLIER

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 8 May 1897

Another inmate of the county poor asylum died on Sunday last, Robert Collier. His age was 70 years, and he had been a charge upon the county about 10 years, coming to the asylum from Brown township. - transcribed by Kim H

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CHARLIE HAYS

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 1 October 1898

Charlie Hays, the well known colored boot-black, died at the poor farm last Sunday night of consumption at the age of 46 years. The deceased has been a resident of this city for a number of years and was known by almost every person in the county. He had been an inmate of the poor farm but a few months previous to his death. The funeral occurred Monday. - transcribed by Kim H

 

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ALEXANDER WESTFALL

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 3 June 1899

Alexander Westfall, an inmate of the county asylum, died this morning at 1 o' clock. He was 61 years old. The remains will be shipped to Waynetown this evening for interment in the Waynetown cemetery. - - thanks so much to Kim H

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WILLIAM HOUSE

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 30 December 1899

WM. HOUSE, for many years an inmate of the county asylum, was buried at Mt. Pleasant, Wednesday- The deceased was 85 years of age, and was one of those unfortunates who had been well-to-do at one time, and had lost, forcing him to accept public charity. - transcribed by kbz

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SHAFFER --

Source: Crawfordsville Review, 19 August 1893

An old man named Shaffer, who has been an inmate of the county asylum for many years, died Tuesday night and was buried Wednesday -- kh

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SAMUEL LOWRY

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 16 February 1900

Samuel Lowry, aged 57 years died Friday at the poor farm. The funeral took place last Sunday morning at 10 o'clock at the home of John Elmore. The deceased had long been a sufferer from consumption, and had been an inmate of the county asylum for about. six months. - transcribed by Kim H

Note: His death record says he is 39 years old, born in Cass County, Indiana. Father: Hiram born Clinton Co IN Mother: Sintha Ann Dickey born Cass Co Ind. Buried Liberty Church Cemetery. Carver & Robbins Undertakers died of TB (duration 2 years) died 2-9-1900

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BENJAMIN MARKET

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 19 July 1901

Benjamin F. Market, aged sixty-four years, died of malarial fever Wednesday at the poor farm of which he had been an inmate but a short time. The funeral took place yesterday, interment at the Lutheran cemetery near Wallace. Mr. Market came from near Alamo and was an old soldier. He had filled his application to be admitted to the soldiers' home. - transcribed by Kim H

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WILLIAM CLEVENGER

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 7 March 1902

William Clevenger, aged 39 years died Sunday at the county Asylum of pulmonary tuberculosis. The Funeral occurred Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock - thanks to Kim H

AARON S. HUGHES

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, October 1, 1897

Aaron S Hughes, aged 70 years, died last Tuesday at the county poor farm. The body was taken Tuesday to Winchester, where his wife is buried. Mr. Hughes came to Crawfordsville forty years ago and was one of the pioneer photographers of Indiana. He finally quit this trade and became a carriage trimmer. He had at one time a very nice little property, but sickness and inability to work consumed it, and in his old age he was left penniless. However, he had friends who would have cared for him, but he refused to become a burden upon them and elected to go to the county asylum. A young man whom he raised, and who now holds a good position in New York, sent him money occasionally, and Mr. Hughes was not to be found at the poor farm except when he was ill. Then he went there because he could receive, better care there than elsewhere -- thanks to Kim H. for this one

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FLEMING BATES

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 24 August 1900

Fleming Bates, aged 88 years, died Monday night at the county poor farm, The remains were taken to Westfield, his old home, for interment. He came to the infirmary from near Darlington and had only been an inmate about a year. He was born in Virginia and had been in the insane asylum several years before going to the poor farm. His brother-in-law. who attended to the funeral, was his only living relative, never having been married. - transcribed by Kim H

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KATY HOPKINS PAYNE

Source: Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,22 February 1901

Mrs. Katy Hopkins Payne, aged sixty-nine years, died last Friday of paralysis at the county poor house. She had been an inmate of the place for just two years to the day, coming from New Richmond. The funeral took place Sunday at the poor farm where she was also buried. - transcribed by Kim H

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WILLIAM CLEVENGER

Source:Crawfordsville Weekly Journal,Crawfordsville, 7 March 1902

William Clevenger, aged 39 years died Sunday at the county Asylum of pulmonary tuberculosis. The Funeral occurred Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock

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Source: Crawfordsville Star, March 31, 1887 p 3

The grand jury before adjourning returned a terrible indictment against the alleged Christian philanthropy of Montgomery County as expressed in her eleemosynary (sic) institutions. The six honorable and circumspect gentlemen who composed the very thoughtful and grave grand jury made a critical inspection of the county poor farm. They screwed up their courage and inspected and then came away and fumigated their clothes, bathed themselves in bay rum and then wrote a scathing review of the affairs at the poor farm that ought to drive the well-fed Board of County Commissioners into doing their plain and imperative duty.

From their careful and conscientious finding we reduce the facts to this effect:
"We find the poor house and surroundings in a condition as good as could be expected with such poorly arranged and such beggardly furniture; and so far as it lies in mortal power the Superintendent, Mr. George Myers, has kept things cleanly and neatly.

The jury would recommend the removal of the poor ffarm and poor house institutions to some other part of the county, 6 or 8 miles from the city, near some creek or never failing stream of water suitable for drainage, and at least 40 acres of such farm to be timbered land.

The present house is not suitable for the purposes of a county house; it is not arranged properly and cannot be so arranged except by the outlay of a vast sum of money. It needs new floors all over it. It is very badly in need of heat, now being heated by stoves, and not at all suited for being fitted with a furnace. The most objectable feature is that the men and women are virtually lodged on the same floor, only a stairway separating them, the men being above and the women on the floor below - thus increasing rather than decreasing the pauperism in our honored county.

There are 41 paupers herded in 14 rooms, averaging three persons to each room. There is no bath room arrangements of any kind. The land is so near Crawfordsville as to be extremely valuable and the money realized from its sale could be well invested again as the jury has already pointed out.

If the old house is to be used longer it can only be by most of the floors being repaired, so as to prevent the breaking of limbs.

2d There must be an immediate purchase of a cooking range;. 3rd Two more cupboards, one for the kitchen and one for the dining room 4th The pantry requires new shelving. 5th A change of bedding for each room.

The jury reommends the immediate removal to a separate building of one John Maxwell, an epileptic, whose condition is so vile and filthy as to be a menace to all laws of health and cleanliness, a constant invitation to pestilence and contagious diseases. Also the jury recommends additional privy vaults, those in use being filthy beyond description. There is a need of new stoves and stovepipes in nearly every room in the building. The cisterns all need repairs and several new pumps should be purchased at once. Also,t he jury found the outbuildings in miserable repair and the farming implements practically worthless, and recommend th epurchase of new implements at once. The jury found plenty of provisions, bacon, potatoes, flour, etc. also found the live stock, milk cows, hogs, etc in excellent condition and plenty of hay and corn to feed them."
The jury also inspected the mail and pronounced it in a neat and well kept condition, but reported an absolute failure of th eheating appratus in use, and recommended a furnace which will comfortably heat the residence part of the cells and the hospital wards. The jury did a good day's work when they drew up this ringing indictment. - kbz

===================

Source: Crawfordsville Indiana Star, March 31, 1887 p 3 The grand jury before adjourning returned a terrible indictment against the alleged Christian philanthropy of Montgomery County as expressed in her elecmosynary institutions. The six honorable and circumspect gentlemen who composed the very thoughtful and grave grand jury made a critical inspection of the county poor farm. They screwed up their courage and inspected and then came away and fumigated their clothes, bathed themselves in bay rum, and then wrote a scathing review of the affairs at the poor farm that ought to drive the well-fed Board of County Commissioners into doing their plain and imperative duty. From their careful and conscientious finding we reduce the facts to this effect: “We find the poor house and surroundings in a condition as good as could be expected with such poorly arranged and such beggarly furniture; and so far as it lies in mortal power the Superintendent, Mr. George Myers, has kept things cleanly and neatly. The jury would recommend the removal of the poor farm and poor house institutions to some other part of the county, six or eight miles from the city, near some creek or never failing stream of water suitable for drainage, and at least 40 acres of such farm to be timbered land. The present house is not suitable for the purposes of a county house; it is not arranged properly and cannot be so arranged except by the outlay of a vast sum of money. It needs new floors all over it. It is very badly in need of heat, now being heated by stoves and not at all suited for being fitted with furnace. The most objectionable feature is that the men and women are virtually lodged on the same floor, only a stairway separating them, the men being above and women on the floor below – thus increasing rather than decreasing the pauperism in our honored county. There are 41 paupers herded in 14 rooms, averaging 3 persons to each room. There is no bath room arrangements of any kind. The land is so near Crawfordsville as to be extremely valuable and the money realized from its cell could be well invested again as the jury has already pointed out. If the old house is to be used much longer it cn only be by most of the floors being repaired so as to prevent the breaking of limbs. 2d There must be an immediate purchase of a cooking range 3d. Two more cupboards, one for the kitchen and one for the dining room. 4th the pantry requires new shelving. 5th A change of bedding for each room. The jury recommend the immediate removal to a separate building of one John Maxwell, an epileptic, whose condition is so vile and filthy as to be a menace to all laws of health and cleanliness a constant invitation to pestilence and contagious diseases. Also the jury recommend additional privy vaults, those in use being filthy beyond description. There is a need of new stoves and stovepipes in nearly every room in the building. The cisterns all need repairs and several new pumps should be purchased at once. Also, the jury found the outbuildings in miserable repair and farming implements practically worthless, and recommend the purchase of new implements at once. The jury found plenty of provisions, bacon, potatoes, flour, etc. also found the live stock, ilk cows, hogs, etc. in excellent condition and plenty of hay and corn to feed them. The jury also inspected the ail and pronounced it is a net and well kept condition, but reported an absolute failure of the heating apparatus in use, and recommended a furnace which will comfortably heat the residence part and the cells and the hospital wards. The jury did a good day’s work when they drew up this ringing indictment.

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Source: Crawfordsville Daily Journal 30-Apr-1904 5: 6 Lived and buried at; Poor farm Death of Charley Hays, One-armed Charley Hays for many years a noted character

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Source: Sunday Star, July 8, 1901 p 4

Samuel Himes, who was appointed superintendent of the county farm to succeed George Myers, has given up the job and the commission on Tuesday appointed William Brown in his place. Mr. Brown is at present an employee of the Big Four Railroad as being carpenter. - kbz (don't ya' wonder how long Wm. Brown or George Myers was there?)

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AL ANTON

Source: Crawfordsville Daily Journal 18 February 1926 p 1

Al Anton age 78 for the past 10 years an inmate at the county farm, died today at noon from a heart attack. Mr. Anton succumed while eating dinner at the farm.

For several years the deceased worked as a tailor in New Richmond and Wingate and will be remembered by many persons there. He formerly worked as a tailor in Chicago and lost his property there at the time of the big Chicago fire many years ago.

The funeral services will be conducted at the grave with burial at New RIchmond cemetery Saturday morning at 10 o'clock - kbz

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Bridgett LOHLER

Source: Indiana Certific ate of Death #27483

Died Montgomery County Home, Union Twp, Montgomery County, Indiana
Lived there 25 years. How long in US ? 60 years Age: 76 Years born 1857
Female White Single
Died of Carcinoma on face - 3 years duration and Nephritis - 7 years
Died 3 p.m. Sept 7, 1933Dr. Fred N. Daugherty
She was born in Ireland and had worked as a housekeeper
Parents and place of birth all listed as "Unknown"
Informant: County Home Records, Crawfordsville, Ind
Buried: CALVARY Cemetery 9-9-1933 by Utterback & Murphy Undertakers


***BURIALS AT THE COUNTY FARM***

************************************************************************

AIKENS, Theodore A.

Born about 1844 in New York died at the Poor farm (Indiana Certificate of death 1901 p 3) March 12, 1901 of (as with many) Tuberculosis (Consumption) which he had had for many years but had only resided at the farm a few months..

Source: Crawfordsville, Indiana Daily News Review, March 12, 1901 p 1- Theodore A. Aikens, aged 57 years, died with consumption this morning at the county house where he had been an inmate for two months. The burial took place this afternoon at the farm cemetery, short services being conducted by Rev. Nave.

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BEARD, James

Born December 9, 1844 he died at the poor farm (Informant on Death Record 1915 p 17) was County Farm Superintendent Bert Knight. Dr. F.O. Schenk noted that James Beard died of a cerebral hemorrhage on May 22, 1915 at 6 p.m. He was buried the next day and had been at the home since 1872. In two census records, his parents were listed as born in Ireland whereas he was born in NY City. Kim found his birth in the NY Episcopal Diocese records (St. Peter's Parish) born Dec 9, 1844 son of Joseph and Ellen Beard. Baptized December 9, 1845.

*********

BENNETT, Noah Emmett

His Montgomery County Indiana Certificate of death #61-042945 says he was born Feb 14, 1881 and died Dec 8, 1961 of a cerebral hemorrhage. Dr. Fred N. Daughterty was the farm's physician and pronounced him dead at 7:40. The home's matron, Mrs. Frank Newlin gave information that he was a laborer and parents were: Elmber Bennett and Martha Ann Paxton. He died and was buried at the County home. On his WWI Draft registration he worked at farming with Herbert Peebles and was listed as being tall, medium build, blue eyes and light hair.

*******

BOTTORFF, Clarence Heath "Doc"

Born in Indiana July 28, 1907 he died at Culver Hospital on Feb 17, 1967. Father was Elbert and mother Estella Elmore of Carcinoma of the larynx. His daughter, Mrs. Fred Long gave the information on his certificate of death. He was married to Margaret Katherine Carver and they had at least four children, twin sons who died and Rose and Roselyn also twins. Dr. Richard Eggers, our own family doctor, took care of him and signed him death record. He was buried by Hunt & Son Feb 20, 1967 at the county farm. Believe he was one of the original 9 on the Crawfordsville District Public Library's database so evidently had a stone there at one time..

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BRANSON, Worham

There is a question as to his first name, but on his death record, it looks like Worham. He died at the county farm Nov 16, 1917 at 5:20 in the evening when he fell and broke a hip as he had a cerebral hemorrhage. He was buried in the small cemetery there two days later. Dr. Fred N. Daughterty signed his death record. and Superintendent, Seth Swank was the informatnt. His father was listed as Thomas Branson born in Tenn and mother Easter Lay born in Tennesse. He, too, was born there. Kim has found many of his relatives she has connected on findagrave

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BRYANT, David

Born about 1860, in Montgomery County Indiana his parents were David and Anna Wyatt Bryant. He died at the Poor farm of cardio and renal disease on 2 June 1945 and was buried two days later he was "interred at the Poor Farm" by Hunt & Son Funearl home. (Indiana Certificate of Death 18730)

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OWENS, Owen

Source Crawfordsville Weekly Journal, 22 December 1893

Owen Owens died at the poor farm Friday and was buried Saturday. - thanks Kim H

 


***OTHERS DYING AT THE COUNTY FARM - buried elsewhere or unknown place***

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BROWN, Nancy

Born August 28, 1856. Died at the County Infirmary (Death Certificate 27122) , in Montgomery County Indiana. She was a widow. Dr. EH Cowan attended her from January 1918 until August 1923 when she died on the 23rd 1918 at 1:30 p.m. Her father was Henry Brown although it says she was a widow it gave no husband. Mother was Elizabeth Richardson - both born in Kentucky. The informant was JM Brown of Ladoga and she was buried on August 29, 1918 at Ladoga.

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CARSON, Mary

p. 160 Utterback Funeral Home Pauper casket - died County Farm on --------------. Pauper Casket manufactured in Crawfordsville. Funeral $40 - services at Wingate. Dr. Swope - valvular heart attack. Born Ohio.

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COX, Joseph

Indiana Certificate of Death 8659. Buried at the Darlington IOOF Cemetery - I have added him to that cemetery. Born in Montgomery County on November 17, 1855 son of James (b. NC) and Catherine Goebel born in Indiana. He had been at the poor farm for five years before passing on March 31, 1927 at 7 p.,m. Buried the next day. Died of Organic Heart disease and was buried by the Brainard Funeral Home folks.

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DEAN, William

born Kentucky 31 March 1831 (from Utterback Funeral Home listings p 180) Father: Henry Dean b Kentucky Mother: Nancy Grizzle born Kentucky. Died County Farm June 12, 1920 from Smartsburg buried New Ross. Rev. Hill officiated. Cash was received from Utterbacks by the county $40. Oh, shoot I just put New R - maybe New Richmond but since lived in Smartsburg, probably New Ross - I'll have to relook sometime -- kbz

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FULWIDER, David

Source: Indiana Certificate of Death #276

David Fulwider. Married Nancy Fulwider. Born: Nov 4, 1838. Montgomery County Indiana. Father: Hosea (looks more like Mosea) Fulwider place of birth unknown Mother: Unknown place of her birth unknown. Age 80 Years 8 MOnths 16 Days. Died July 12, 1919 at County Farm in Union Twp (Crawfordsville) Indiana. Dr. EH Cowan attended him from July 13, to July 17 when he died at 9 p.m. of Valvula dis of heart - mitral. Informant: Nancy Fulwider He had been at the county asylum for 1 month. Buried Odd Fellows Cemetery July 19 by WL Hunt, Crawfordsville.

 

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GEARHART, A.

died December 6, 1919 at the county Farm. (Utterback Funeral Home listings p 129) - Shoe cobbler born in Germany age 78. Funeral on 12-7-1919 at Ladoga. Buried at Ladoga. $40 bill to county.

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GRAY, Andrew F.

Indiana Certificate of Death

Died Feb 15, 1911 at County Farm, Union Township, Montgomery County, Indiana

Born Dec 24 __ -- Age: 73 Years 1 month 21 days

Dr. FO Schenck attended deceased from Oct 1909 to Feb 15, 1911 when he died at 12:00 (a.m. ? p.m.?) of Arterio Sclerosis and exhausted heart muscles

Widower - Ann Gray

Born: Kentucky
Father: Andrew Gray born Kentucky

Mother: Unknown born Kentucky

Teamster

Informant Robert Gray, Crawfordsville.

Buried Feb 17, 1911 in Oak Hill Cemetery by Barnhil

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GREENLEAF, Callie

1900 Crawfordsville census Andrew Greenleaf 42; Nancy S 36; John 15; Robert 12; Charles W. 11; Myra 9; CALLA 7; Leonard 3 -- died Poor Farm 2-2-1947 at 2:30 p.m. Born Feb 3, 1894 at the county poor farm. She was there 33 years. Buried Oak Hill Cemetery.

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JONES, Jennie

- p. 162 Utterback Funeral Home listings -- died March 16, 1920 - charge to County Farm. Buried Harshbarger cemetery 3-17 (there is more than one by that name so did not add her to findagrave). Exhaustion. Age 71 Years 9 Months 8 days. Born April 8, 1858. Father: Dan Bradley born Indiana Mother: Mary Hamilton born Indiana. Buried in a pauper's outfit.

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MULLEN, Frank

died County Farm July 23, 1920 ordered by Mr. Dunbar funeral was on July 25th at New Market. Cost was $22.50 - check Death Record H-36 p 114 sometime

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RICE, Albert

Death Certificate 21062 - died Montgomery County Poor Farm - widowed D. July 31, 1921 age 84 years. Barber. Parents unknown buried Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana - by Profitt & Sons - Earlham Cemetery.

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SWISHER, Susan

Do want to read her obituary as she had an inquest into her death. She died of Epislepsy on August 21, 1928 at 4 p.m. and was buried in Pisgah Cemetery by Hunt & Sons near New Ross on the 24th. Her father was Jackson Swisher born in Virginia and mother Lizzie Pickrel born Indiana. Dr. JB Griffith was her physician at the farm. She was born in Iowa on July 12, 1851. Death Certificate 25447 says buried Pisgah

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