Morgan County INGenWeb

Morgan County INGenWeb

I am Stacey Foley, I need to step down as coordinator for Morgan County and let you know that Morgan County is up for adoption on the INGenWeb.  If you would be interested in becoming the new coordinator for Morgan County, please contact the State Coordinator, Denise Wells. 

Located in Central Indiana, Morgan County is bounded by Hendricks and Marion Counties on the north, Johnson County on the east, Brown and Monroe Counties on the south and Owen and Putnam Counties on the west. It was organized in 1821 from sections of Delaware and Wabash Counties and named for General Daniel Morgan, a Revolutionary War hero.

The county's terrain varies widely from relatively level farmland in the northern sections, to rugged, heavily forested areas in the south. Morgan County is well watered with the West Fork of the White River bisecting the county from the southwest to northeast and numerous tributaries flowing into it. It was along this river where much of the county's early activity occurred.

When the 1818 Treaty of St. Mary's ceded all land south of Fort Wayne to the United States Government, settlement of this vast area began in earnest. It was in that same year that Jacob Whetzel and his son Cyrus blazed a 60-mile trail following an Indian trace from Laurel in Franklin County to an area known as "The Bluffs" near the White River in Morgan County. Known as Whetzel's Trace, it served as the primary route for settlers coming to central Indiana from the east and was heavily used until the construction of the National Road through Indiana during the late 1820s.

Surrounding Counties

Putnam Hendricks Marion
  Morgan Johnson
Owen Monroe Brown

 "The Chosen"

We are the chosen. In each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors. To put flesh on their bones and make them live again. To tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know and approve. Doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts but, instead, breathing life into all who have gone before. We are the story tellers of the tribe. All tribes have one. We have been called, as it were, by our genes. Those who have gone before cry out to us: Tell our story. So, we do. In finding them, we somehow find ourselves. How many graves have I stood before now and cried? I have lost count. How many times have I told the ancestors, "You have a wonderful family; you would be proud of us.". How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me? I cannot say. It goes beyond just documenting facts. It goes to who I am, and why I do the things I do. It goes to seeing a cemetery about to be lost forever to weeds and indifference and saying - I can't let this happen. The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought and some died to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before."


by Della M. Cummings Wright; Rewritten by her granddaughter Dell Jo Ann McGinnis Johnson; Edited and Reworded by Tom Dunn, 1943."

 

According to the Society of Indiana Pioneers, an individual was a pioneer of our county if they resided here on or before December 31, 1830.

Indiana automobile License Plates issued in Morgan County start with the prefix 55 because it is the fifty-fifth county in alphabetical listing.

The USGenWeb:

USGenWeb

 

Contact Us:

Stacey Foley & Roberta Stephens
Site Coordinators

Denise Wells - State Coordinator
Lena Harper - Assistant State Coordinator
Jeff Kemp - Assistant State Coordinator

INGenWeb Project 

INGenWeb

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